Modal share


Modal share

Modal share, Mode split or Modal split, is a traffic / transport term that describes the number of trips or (more common) percentage of travelers using a particular type of transportation.[1]

The term is often used when analysing the sustainability of transport within a city or region. In recent years, many cities have set modal share targets for balanced and sustainable transport modes, particularly 30% of non-motorized (cycling and walking) and 30% of public transport.

Contents

Modal split in European cities

The following table presents the modal split of journeys to work in some European cities with a population above 250,000.[2]

City walking cycling public transport private motor vehicle year
Denmark Aarhus 7% 27% 19% 43% 2004
Spain Alicante 18% 0% 13% 69% 2004
Netherlands Amsterdam 4% 22% 30% 44% 2004
Italy Bari 13% 1% 14% 72% 2001
Germany Berlin 30% 13% 26% 31% 2008
Switzerland Bern 11% 11% 54% 24% 2001
Spain Bilbao 23% 0% 34% 43% 2004
United Kingdom Birmingham 1% 1% 25% 66% 2001
Italy Bologna 8% 4% 21% 67% 2001
Germany Bonn 9% 13% 21% 57% 2004
Slovakia Bratislava 4% 0% 70% 26% 2004
Germany Bremen 7% 19% 24% 50% 2004
Hungary Budapest 22% 2% 30% 46% 2004
Finland Helsinki 12% 6% 40% 41% 2004
Germany Cologne 8% 9% 27% 56% 2004
Denmark Copenhagen 6% 36% 29% 26% 2004
Spain Córdoba 18% 1% 10% 71% 2004
Germany Dortmund 7% 3% 23% 67% 2004
Germany Dresden 24% 17% 21% 38% 2008
Germany Düsseldorf 11% 5% 31% 53% 2004
Netherlands Eindhoven 3% 24% 8% 65% 2004
Germany Essen 9% 2% 20% 69% 2004
Italy Florence 8% 4% 21% 69% 2001
Germany Frankfurt 11% 7% 39% 43% 2004
Germany Freiburg im Breisgau 11% 13% 12% 63% 2004
Spain Gijón 24% 0% 17% 59% 2004
Sweden Göteborg 12% 14% 21% 52% 2004
Germany Hamburg 8% 8% 33% 51% 2004
Germany Hanover 9% 13% 29% 49% 2004
Spain Las Palmas 12% 0% 24% 64% 2004
Portugal Lisbon 10% 0% 46% 40% 2001
Spain Madrid 9% 0% 43% 48% 2004
Spain Málaga 12% 0% 11% 77% 2004
Sweden Malmö 6% 24% 18% 51% 2004
Germany Munich 9% 8% 41% 41% 2004
Spain Murcia 18% 1% 7% 74% 2004
Italy Naples 13% 0% 26% 60% 2001
Germany Nuremberg 11% 7% 30% 52% 2004
Italy Palermo 12% 1% 9% 78% 2001
France Paris 55% 3% 31% 11% 2008[3]
Czech Republic Prague 23% 1% 43% 33% 2009[4]
Italy Rome 7% 0% 24% 68% 2001
Netherlands Rotterdam 5% 14% 25% 56% 2004
Sweden Stockholm 15% 7% 43% 33% 2004
Netherlands The Hague 5% 22% 30% 43% 2004
Spain Seville 13% 1% 15% 71% 2004
Germany Stuttgart 13% 4% 32% 51% 2004
Estonia Tallinn 16% 0% 50% 34% 2004
Italy Turin 12% 3% 5% 79% 2004
Netherlands Utrecht 3% 21% 25% 51% 2004
Spain Valencia 16% 1% 21% 62% 2004
Spain Valladolid 22% 1% 20% 57% 2004
Austria Vienna 28% 5% 36% 31 % 2010[5]
Spain Vigo 19% 0% 13% 68% 2004
Poland Warsaw 21% 1% 54% 24% 2005[6]
Spain Zaragoza 17% 0% 29% 54% 2004
Slovakia Zilina 34.6% 3.6% 24.2% 37.6% ....
Switzerland Zürich 8% 5% 63% 25% 2001

Modal share targets

The Charter of Brussels, signed by 36 cities including Brussels, Ghent, Milan, Munich, Seville, Edinburgh, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Gdansk, and Timisoara, commits the signatories to achieve at least 15% of bicycling modal share by 2020, and calls upon European institutions to do likewise.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Glossary (Engineering Services - Transportation, City of Vancouver website. Accessed 2009-06-04.)
  2. ^ Urban Audit, retrieved 2009-10-03
  3. ^ [1], retrieved 2011-08-09
  4. ^ The yearbook of transportation Prague 2009, page 5, retrieved 2011-03-23
  5. ^ [2], (German) retrieved 2011-03-13
  6. ^ Warszawskie Badania Ruchu 2005, (Polish) retrieved 2009-12-17
  7. ^ Charter of Brussels, retrieved 2009-10-03



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