Cave of Adullam

The Cave of Adullam was originally an underground cavern and/or fortress (*) referred to in the Old Testament, near the town of Adullam, in which David, already anointed to succeed Saul as king, sought refuge from the latter (e.g. 1 Samuel 22 ff).

The cave is the source of the term Adullamites, which is used generally to refer to groups of political outsiders plotting their comeback or the overthrow of the status quo, especially after recent defeat. The term originated as a derisory name for a dissident faction within the British Liberal party during the Victorian era.

(*) The word for cave is usually used but the word for fortress, which has a similar appearance in writing, is used as well. Of course, given that this was a bandits' hideout, it would be reasonable to describe this as a fortified cave.


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  • cave of adullam — əˈdələm Usage: usually C&A Etymology: from Adullam, biblical cave where David fled to escape Achish, king of Gath, & where he was joined by other discontented people (1 Sam 22:1 2) : a group of seceders from a particular political or intellectual …   Useful english dictionary

  • Adullam — is a town referred to in the Hebrew Bible. It was one of the royal cities of the Canaanites (Joshua 12:15; 15:35). It stood near the highway which later became the Roman road in the Valley of Elah, the scene of David s memorable victory over… …   Wikipedia

  • Adullam — • Details on two places with this name Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Adullam     Adullam     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • cave of A|dul|lam — «uh DUHL uhm», (in English politics) a secession, or group of people who secede, from a political party on a particular issue (from a speech by John Bright comparing the seceders of the English Liberal Party in 1886 to the followers of David who… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Adullam —    One of the royal cities of the Canaanites, now Aid el ma (Josh. 12:15; 15:35). It stood on the old Roman road in the valley of Elah (q.v.), which was the scene of David s memorable victory over Goliath (1 Sam. 17:2), and not far from Gath. It… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Cave —    There are numerous natural caves among the limestone rocks of Syria, many of which have been artificially enlarged for various purposes.    The first notice of a cave occurs in the history of Lot (Gen. 19:30).    The next we read of is the… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Cave — (k[=a]v), n. [F. cave, L. cavus hollow, whence cavea cavity. Cf. {Cage}.] 1. A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den. [1913 Webster] 2. Any hollow place, or part; a cavity. [Obs.] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cave bear — Cave Cave (k[=a]v), n. [F. cave, L. cavus hollow, whence cavea cavity. Cf. {Cage}.] 1. A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den. [1913 Webster] 2. Any hollow place, or part; a cavity. [Obs …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cave dweller — Cave Cave (k[=a]v), n. [F. cave, L. cavus hollow, whence cavea cavity. Cf. {Cage}.] 1. A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den. [1913 Webster] 2. Any hollow place, or part; a cavity. [Obs …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cave hyena — Cave Cave (k[=a]v), n. [F. cave, L. cavus hollow, whence cavea cavity. Cf. {Cage}.] 1. A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den. [1913 Webster] 2. Any hollow place, or part; a cavity. [Obs …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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