Cishan culture

The Cishan culture (磁山文化) (8000-5500 BC) was a Neolithic Yellow River culture in northern China, based primarily around southern Hebei. The Cishan culture was based on millet farming, the cultivation of which on one site has been dated back 10,000 years.[1] Common artifacts from the culture include stone grinders, stone sickles and tripod pottery.

Since the culture shared many similarities with its southern neighbor, the Peiligang culture, both cultures are sometimes referred to together as the Cishan-Peiligang culture or Peiligang-Cishan culture. The Cishan culture also shared several similarities with its eastern neighbor, the Beixin culture.

The type site at Cishan is located in Wu'an, Hebei, China. The site covered an area of around 80,000 m². The houses at Cishan were semi-subterranean and round. The site showed evidence of domesticated pigs, dogs and chicken, with pigs providing the primary source of meat. Fish was also an important part of the diet at Cishan.

Over 500 subterranean storage pits were discovered at Cishan. These pits were used to store millet. The largest pits were 5 meters deep and capable of storing up to 1000 kg of millet.

See also

References

  1. ^ Lu H, Zhang J, Liu KB, Wu N, Li Y, Zhou K, Ye M, Zhang T, Zhang H, Yang X, Shen L, Xu D, Li Q. (2009). Earliest domestication of common millet (Panicum miliaceum) in East Asia extended to 10,000 years ago. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 106: 7367–7372 PubMed

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cishan — may mean: Cishan culture, a Neolithic culture in southern Hebei, People s Republic of China Cishan, Wu an (磁山镇), town in Wu an, Hebei, People s Republic of China Cishan, Kaohsiung (旗山區), a township in Kaohsiung, Republic of China (Taiwan) Cishan… …   Wikipedia

  • Cishan — Die Cishan Kultur (chin. 磁山文化, Cishan wenhua, engl. Cishan Culture) ist eine nach dem Fundort Cishan, Stadt Wu an (武安市), Provinz Hebei, Nordchina, benannte frühe neolithische Kultur. Der namensgebende Fundort wurde 1973 entdeckt. Die Kultur war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cishan-Stätte — Die Cishan Kultur (chin. 磁山文化, Cishan wenhua, engl. Cishan Culture) ist eine nach dem Fundort Cishan, Stadt Wu an (武安市), Provinz Hebei, Nordchina, benannte frühe neolithische Kultur. Der namensgebende Fundort wurde 1973 entdeckt. Die Kultur war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cishan wenhua — Die Cishan Kultur (chin. 磁山文化, Cishan wenhua, engl. Cishan Culture) ist eine nach dem Fundort Cishan, Stadt Wu an (武安市), Provinz Hebei, Nordchina, benannte frühe neolithische Kultur. Der namensgebende Fundort wurde 1973 entdeckt. Die Kultur war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cishan yizhi — Die Cishan Kultur (chin. 磁山文化, Cishan wenhua, engl. Cishan Culture) ist eine nach dem Fundort Cishan, Stadt Wu an (武安市), Provinz Hebei, Nordchina, benannte frühe neolithische Kultur. Der namensgebende Fundort wurde 1973 entdeckt. Die Kultur war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cishan-Kultur — Prähistorische Kulturen China[1] Paläolithikum Xihoudu Kultur 1800000 BP Fulin Kultur v. Chr …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cishan — La culture Cishan est une culture néolithique découverte en 1976, dans le district de Wu an, au Hebei en Chine[1]. Les objets que l on y a trouvés ont été datés de 6 000 ans avant J. C. grâce à des datations par le carbone 14. Les céramiques de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Culture de Yangshao — 36° 18′ N 109° 06′ E / 36.3, 109.1 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Culture de Majiayao — Majiayao La culture de Majiayao (vers 3800 1900 avant Jésus Christ) est une culture néolithique dans la Chine ancienne, nord ouest de la Chine (est du Gansu et du Qinghai). Elle a longtemps été considérée comme la phase Majiayao de la culture… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Culture majiayao — Majiayao La culture de Majiayao (vers 3800 1900 avant Jésus Christ) est une culture néolithique dans la Chine ancienne, nord ouest de la Chine (est du Gansu et du Qinghai). Elle a longtemps été considérée comme la phase Majiayao de la culture… …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.