Woman's Hour


Woman's Hour

"Woman's Hour" is a magazine programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in the United Kingdom.

Created by Norman Collins and originally presented by Alan Ivimey the programme was first broadcast on 7 October 1946 on the BBC's Light Programme (now called Radio 2). It was transferred to its current home in 1973. Over the years it has been presented by Olive Shapley, Jean Metcalfe (1947, 1958), Marjorie Anderson (until 1972), Judith Chalmers (1966 – 1970), Sue MacGregor (1972 – 1987), Jenni Murray (1987 – present), and Martha Kearney (1998 – March 2007). Sheila McClennon regularly filled in for Murray and Kearney before joining the presenting team of "You and Yours". More recently, Carolyn Quinn, Jane Little and Ritula Shah have hosted occasional programmes, and guest presenters have included Oona King and Amanda Platell. Jane Garvey became part of the presenting team on Monday 8 October 2007. On 1 January 2005, the show became "Man's Hour" for one day only, on which it was presented by Channel 4 News anchor Jon Snow.

In its current format, the first 45 minutes of the programme consists of reports, interviews and debates on health, education, cultural and political topics ostensibly aimed at women and mothers (but often of general interest). The last 15 minutes are taken up with short-run drama serials "(Woman's Hour Drama‎)"which periodically change. One of the most popular of these are the recurring "Ladies of Letters" serials starring Prunella Scales and Patricia Routledge. Before 1998 the last quarter of an hour was dedicated to readings.

"Woman's Hour" was broadcast in the early afternoon until September 1991, but the programme's move to a 10am morning slot was unpopular among some listeners who, for family or other reasons, work only in the morning. Michael Green, the controller of Radio 4, made his decision the previous year and considered the elimination of the programme title; [David Hendy "Life on Air: A History of Radio Four", 2007, OUP, p332.] its "outdated" title is a subject of consternation in some quarters. A weekend version is broadcast on Saturday afternoons at 4pm, which features highlights of the previous week.

In its earlier years, it used a variety of popular light classics as signature tunes, including such pieces as Anthony Collins' "Vanity Fair" and the lively Overture from Gabriel Faure's "Masques et Bergamasques." From the early 1970s, specially composed pieces were used.

Research consistently shows that approximately a third of the programme's listeners are male. [http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19961006/ai_n14087970/pg_2]

References

External links

* [http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour/ Woman's Hour (bbc.co.uk)]
* [http://feeds.bbc.co.uk/feeds/rss/radio4/womanshour.xml Woman's Hour RSS feed (bbc.co.uk)]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Woman's Hour — Woman’s Hour [Womans Hour] a British radio programme consisting of a wide range of reports, talks and fiction by, for and about women. It has been broadcast every ↑weekday on ↑Radio 4 since 1946 …   Useful english dictionary

  • Woman's Hour — a British radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio, which has news, ↑interviews, and discussions on subjects considered to be of special interest to women …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Woman’s Hour — a British radio programme consisting of a wide range of reports, talks and fiction by, for and about women. It has been broadcast every weekday on Radio 4 since 1946. * * * …   Universalium

  • Woman's Hour Drama — The Woman s Hour Drama is a BBC Radio 4 Arts and Drama production. It consists of 15 minute episodes, broadcast every weekday 10.45 11.00am (i.e. at the end of Woman s Hour proper), repeated 7.45 8.00pm. These tend to be plays which extend over a …   Wikipedia

  • Hour — Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hour angle — Hour Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hour circle — Hour Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hour hand — Hour Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hour line — Hour Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hour plate — Hour Hour, n. [OE. hour, our, hore, ure, OF. hore, ore, ure, F. heure, L. hora, fr. Gr. ?, orig., a definite space of time, fixed by natural laws; hence, a season, the time of the day, an hour. See {Year}, and cf. {Horologe}, {Horoscope}.] 1. The …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.