Rasheed Wallace


Rasheed Wallace

Infobox NBA Player


name = Rasheed Wallace
nickname = Sheed
position = Power Forward/Center
height_ft = 6
height_in = 11
weight_lbs = 230
number = 30
nickname = Sheed, Roscoe
league = NBA
team = Detroit Pistons
nationality = American
birth_date = birth date and age|1974|9|17
birth_place = Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
college = North Carolina
draft = 4th overall
draft_year = 1995
draft_team = Washington Bullets
career_start = 1995
highschool = Simon Gratz High School
former_teams = Washington Bullets (1995–1996) Portland Trail Blazers (1996–2004) Atlanta Hawks (2004)
awards = 4x NBA All-Star (2000, 2001, 2006, 2008) 1x NBA Champion

Rasheed Abdul Wallace (born September 17, 1974) is an American professional basketball player. He currently plays Center for the Detroit Pistons of the National Basketball Association. At 6 ft 11½ in (212 cm) and 230 lb (104 kg), Wallace plays power forward or center depending on the opposition.

Originally selected out of the University of North Carolina by the Washington Bullets (now the Wizards) as the fourth pick in the 1995 NBA Draft, Wallace was named to the All-Rookie second team following his first season. Following the same season he was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers in exchange for Rod Strickland and Harvey Grant. He had a career-high 42 points against the Denver Nuggets in 2000 and was a key member of the Blazers team that made it to the Western Conference Finals that same year. Wallace had a career best 19.4 points per game in 2002 for the Blazers.

In 2004 Rasheed Wallace helped power the Detroit Pistons to the NBA title and obtained his first championship ring. In Detroit, Wallace has become known for selfless team play and integrated with Ben Wallace to form the core of the Pistons' smothering defensive game. He dubbed the duo "Wallace x 2" shortly after he arrived in Detroit in 2004.

On October 27 2007, Wallace stated that the NBA is no longer like a sport, but more like the World Wrestling Federation: fake and just for money and entertainment. NBA Commissioner David Stern rebuked him by calling his statement "disrespectful." [cite news |url=http://www.detroitnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071027/SPORTS0102/710270323/1127 |last=McCosky |first=Chris |date=2007-10-27 |title=Wallace gets Stern rebuke |publisher=The Detroit News |accessdate=2008-02-24]

Early years

Wallace was born and raised in the inner city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He began his basketball career in Philadelphia and attended Simon Gratz High School he played basketball and was destined to make it a career, another of Wallace's passions was art.] . He was named "USA Today High School Player of the Year" after the 1992-93 season and was selected first team All America by Basketball Times.Wallace was also a two-time Parade All-American first teamer. Despite limited playing time of just 19 minutes per game, Wallace still managed to average 16 points, 15 rebounds and 7 blocks during his senior year. In addition to basketball, Wallace also ran track and high jumped as a teenager.

Wallace received MVP honors in the Magic Johnson Roundball Classic, scoring 30 points.Fact|date=May 2008He was, however, outplayed by Darnell Robinson in the McDonald's Game, and remains the only player ever to get ejected from the McDonald's All American Game.

College

University of North Carolina coach Dean Smith lured Wallace to Chapel Hill, North Carolina for his college years. Smith was a revered mentor to Wallace as he was to Wallace's eventual Detroit coach Larry Brown; Wallace has indicated that this North Carolina bond with Brown helped Wallace adjust quickly to the Piston system. During his time at North Carolina, Wallace had success in the national spotlight. Named a second-team All-American by the AP his second year, Wallace ranks as the leading career field goal shooter in Atlantic Coast Conference history with a .635 percentage.

Wallace helped lead the Tar Heels to the NCAA Final Four in 1995. He left North Carolina to enter the 1995 NBA Draft after his sophomore season. Wallace was selected in the 1st round, the 4th pick overall by the Washington Bullets. There were questions surrounding Wallace concerning his toughness, in light of his weak performance against Corliss Williamson in the Final Four.

NBA career

Washington Bullets

As a rookie with the Washington Bullets, Wallace played in 65 games, of which he started 51 for the injured Chris Webber. While mostly playing power forward, he also gained experience in the center position although being physically overmatched. Wallace was selected to the rookie team for the All-Star Weekend. Later that year, he fractured his left thumb during a game against Orlando and could not return until the following year.

Wallace scored 655 points during his rookie season at Washington. He played 1,788 minutes.

Portland Trail Blazers

After the season, Wallace was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers in exchange for Rod Strickland, a move that proved beneficial for both sides.Fact|date=February 2008 He led the Blazers in scoring 12 times during his first season with the team,Fact|date=February 2008 and also ranked third in the league in field goal percentage. [cite web |url=http://www.nba.com/history/fgp/19961997.html |title=Field Goal Percentage - 1996-97 |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-24] However, just as his season was gaining momentum, Wallace again broke his left thumb and was forced to miss the next month of the season, [cite news |url=http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D06E5DF1430F934A15751C1A960958260 |title=Blazers' Wallace Out at Least Four Weeks |date=1996-12-27 |publisher=New York Times |accessdate=2008-02-24] but he returned in time for a strong performance in the first round playoff series against the Los Angeles Lakers. Despite the Blazers losing the series, Wallace's play was a bright spot that gave Blazer fans something to look forward to in 1997-98.Fact|date=February 2008

His next season was filled with many successes. The young superstar signed a long-term contract to stay with the Portland Trail Blazers. He was showcased as the team's all-around player on a club with many specialists.Fact|date=February 2008 He began extending himself into the community more than ever, most notably with his Rasheed Wallace Foundation, but his career suffered from numerous missteps on and off the court. In the 1999-2000 NBA season, he set an NBA record with 38 technical fouls for the season.cite news |url=http://sportsline.com/nba/gamecenter/recap/NBA_20070311_DET@LAC |title=Pistons fine without 'Sheed, beat Clippers behind Rip's 23 points |date=2007-03-11 |publisher=CBSSports.com |accessdate=2008-02-24] However, he would be fifth in the league in field goal percentage. [cite web |url=http://www.nba.com/statistics/1999/default_regular_season_leaders/LeagueLeadersFGPQuery.html?topic=0&stat=6 |title=1999-2000 Regular Season Field Goals Percentage |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-24] The following year, he would break his own record with 40 technicals. Wallace was also suspended by the NBA for seven games for threatening then referee Tim Donaghy on an arena loading dock after a home game in 2003. That was the league's longest suspension for something that did not involve violence or substance abuse. [cite news |url=http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/si_online/news/2003/01/28/nba/ |title=Despite his latest screwup, many teams still covet Rasheed Wallace |last=Thomsen |first=Ian |date=2003-01-29 |publisher=CNNSI.com |accessdate=2008-02-24]

Wallace was named an NBA All-Star in 2000 and 2001 and led the Trail Blazers to the Western Conference Finals in 1999 and 2000, losing to the San Antonio Spurs and the Los Angeles Lakers, respectively. Both teams would go on to win the NBA Finals. The 2000 series against the Lakers was most noted for the underdog Blazers squandering a 15-point lead going into the fourth quarter of Game 7.

Atlanta Hawks

Wallace was traded to the Atlanta Hawks along with Wesley Person for Shareef Abdur-Rahim, Theo Ratliff, and Dan Dickau. [cite news |url=http://www.cbc.ca/sports/story/2004/02/10/hawks-trailblazers040209.html |title=Blazers trade Wallace to Hawks |date=2004-02-11 |publisher=CBC.ca |accessdate=2008-02-21] He played only a single game for the Hawks, scoring 20 points. He also had 6 rebounds, 5 blocks, 2 assists and a steal against the New Jersey Nets. [cite web |url=http://www.nba.com/games/20040218/ATLNJN/boxscore.html |title=Atlanta at New Jersey |date=2004-02-18 |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-21] After the game he was dealt to the Pistons in a three-way trade with the Boston Celtics. The trade sent Wallace from the Atlanta Hawks and guard Mike James from the Boston Celtics to the Detroit Pistons. In turn, Detroit sent guards Chucky Atkins, Lindsey Hunter, and a first-round draft pick to Boston and guard Bobby Sura, center Zeljko Rebraca, and a first-round draft pick to Atlanta. The Boston Celtics also sent forward Chris Mills to Atlanta to complete the deal. [cite news |url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=1739128 |title=Wallace lands in Detroit in three-team deal |date=2004-02-20 |publisher=ESPN.com |accessdate=2008-02-21]

Detroit Pistons

After falling behind against the Indiana Pacers in the 2004 Eastern Conference Finals, he stated boldly in an interview that "We will win Game 2", [cite news |url=http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/nba/pistons/2004-05-23-wallace-guarantee_x.htm |title=Once again, Rasheed guarantees Game 2 victory |date=2004-05-23 |publisher=USATODAY.com |accessdate=2008-02-23] a promise he helped fulfill. [cite news |url=http://www.nba.com/games/20040524/DETIND/recap.html |title=Pistons Swat Pacers, Snag Series Tie |date=2004-05-24 |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-23]

Wallace helped the Pistons win an unexpected NBA title, beating the heavily favored Lakers 4 games to 1. [cite news |url=http://www.nba.com/games/20040615/LALDET/recap.html |title=Pistons Send Lakers Packing, Win Third NBA Title |date=2004-06-15 |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-23] After the championship season, he paid for replica WWE World Heavyweight Championship belts to be made for each of his teammates and presented them as gifts when the 2004-05 regular season started. [cite news |url=http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=280867 |title=Former Pistons get their hands on title belts |last=Enlund |first=Tom |date=2004-12-04 |publisher=JS Online |accessdate=2008-02-23]

In the off-season following the Pistons' championship win, Rasheed Wallace signed a 5-year, $57 million contract to remain with Detroit. [cite news |url=http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/nba/pistons/2004-07-21-rasheed-stays_x.htm |title=Rasheed Wallace signs five-year, $57M deal with Pistons |last=Lage |first=Larry |date=2004-07-21 |publisher=USATODAY.com |accessdate=2008-02-23] He also changed the number of his jersey from #30 to #36.

Throughout the 2004-05 season, Wallace often carried the belt into his locker before games to inspire the Pistons' title defense. On November 27, 2005, with the game tied, 35-35, Wallace protested a foul that was called against him on Milwaukee’s Andrew Bogut. When Bogut missed both free throws, Wallace remarked "Ball Don't Lie" which has since become a well-known basketball catch phrase. He had several notable moments in the playoffs. After the second-round elimination of the Pacers, Wallace played his best series of the postseason in the Eastern Conference finals against the top-seeded Miami Heat. After falling behind again, he again "guaranteed success". He shot a 50% field goal percentage and averaged 14.5 points per game in the series' seven games, and saved his hottest-shooting night for the decisive Game 7. Against the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA Finals, Wallace was criticized for leaving Robert Horry, one of the greatest clutch shooters of all time, open for the game-winning three-pointer in Game 5. Wallace's tenacious defense and clutch shooting helped the Pistons to split the series 3-3, [cite news |url=http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/nba/pistons/2005-06-22-rasheed-atones_x.htm |title=Rasheed Wallace atones for Game 5 miscue |last=Nance |first=Roscoe |date=2005-06-22 |publisher=USATODAY.com |accessdate=2008-02-23] but in the final game, the Pistons lost 81-74.

On February 9 2006, Wallace was selected to play in the 2006 NBA All-Star Game in Houston, Texas as a reserve forward for the Eastern Conference.

In the 2005-06 season, he continued to show his ability as a versatile player with the Pistons. He helped lead them to a 64-18 record, and the top seed in the Eastern Conference for the playoffs. He then helped lead the Pistons to a first round series victory over the Milwaukee Bucks, 4-1, and in the second round against the Cleveland Cavaliers, it began to look as if the series could go like the first round. After blowing out the Cavs in the first two games, Detroit lost the third 86-77. After that, Wallace guaranteed a win as he had in previous seasons. However, Cleveland, with the leadership of LeBron James, went on to win the next two games and lead the series 3-2. Detroit then "rebounded" (literally) back into the series, grabbing four offensive rebounds in the last two minutes of Game 6 and thus preventing Cleveland from scoring, allowing a 84-82 for the Pistons. They then went on to rout the Cavs in Game 7, 79-61, although the Cavs were within one possession at halftime.

In the Eastern Conference Finals, the Pistons played the Heat in a rematch of the previous year's Conference Finals. Pistons lost in six games to the Miami Heat, who went on to capture their first NBA title.

On March 26 2007, in a game against the Denver Nuggets, Rasheed Wallace threw up a 60-foot shot off a stolen inbound pass with 1.5 seconds, shouted "GLASS!", banked it in from just beyond halfcourt and forced overtime letting out a huge roar from what was left of the diminishing Palace crowd, who had assumed the game to be a loss. The Pistons went on to win the game, 113-109. [cite news |url=http://www.nba.com/games/20070326/DENDET/recap.html |title=Wallace Hits Midcourt Shot to Force OT in Pistons Win |date=2007-03-27 |publisher=NBA.com |accessdate=2008-02-23]

On June 2, 2007, Rasheed fouled out of Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals after committing a foul on LeBron James and then received two technical fouls, resulting in an automatic ejection, for arguing with a referee. [cite news |url=http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/2007-06-02-361103860_x.htm |title=Pistons' Wallace ejected from Game 6 |date=2007-06-03 |publisher=USATODAY.com |accessdate=2008-02-23] In a postgame interview, Wallace stated that he was upset at the officiating and did not feel his emotional breakdown cost his team a chance to win.Fact|date=February 2008

Prior to the 2007-08 NBA season, the Pistons would not re-sign Chris Webber, and putting Antonio McDyess as a starting power forward, put Wallace at center. At his new position, Wallace would score 36 points in a game against the Chicago Bulls. He would be a pivotal part in the Pistons success in the early season, dominating the post position.

On February 10, 2008, it was announced that Wallace would be replacing Boston Celtics' injured forward Kevin Garnett in the 2008 NBA All-Star Game in New Orleans. [cite news |url=http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=3239663 |title=Pistons' Wallace replaces gimpy Garnett in All-Star Game |publisher=ESPN |date=2008-02-11 |accessdate=2008-02-24] The decision was made by NBA commissioner David Stern. This was Wallace's fourth All-Star appearance.

In the 2008 Eastern Conference Finals, the Pistons played Garnett and the Celtics. This marked the sixth consecutive time that the Pistons had made it to this point, and five times they had gotten there with Wallace in the lineup. Still, Detroit lost a third consecutive year in the Conference Finals, losing to Boston 4-2. After the game, Rasheed reportedly told reporters, without taking any questions, "It's over, man," perhaps indicating that Pistons' General Manager Joe Dumars would break up the core of the team in the 2008 offseason.

Before the 2008-2009 Season, Wallace changed his number from #36 back to his original #30.

Player profile

As of 2007, Wallace is one of the most versatile power forwards in today's game. He is a legitimate two-way threat, and always known for being tough on defense and potent on offense. Charles Barkley has been quoted as saying that Wallace has the ability to be the "best player in the NBA." [NBA Playoffs: Game 1: 76ers At Pistons. TNT. Atlanta, GA. 20 Apr. 2008.]

On defense, Wallace has established himself as a smothering post presence, playing with great intensity and previously forming one of the great defensive frontcourts with Ben Wallace and Tayshaun Prince. Because of his height, athleticism and long arms, he is considered notoriously hard to post up against. He has established himself as a perennial "NBA All-Defensive Team" candidate.

On offense, he is capable of making almost any play, from a slam dunk to a long 3-point jump shot. Earlier in his career, he had mostly been a low post weapon, with an arsenal of moves reminiscent of another low post artist, Hakeem Olajuwon, but later added a solid midrange shot and even extended his range beyond the arc. Rasheed Wallace has credited his years at North Carolina in becoming a technically and fundamentally sound player. He is criticized for playing too much on the perimeter as opposed to down low, where he is arguably more efficient.

Earlier in his career, he was widely considered a volatile player, and regularly led the NBA in technical fouls, setting a still-standing league record with 41 in 2000-2001. This problem has continued into his Piston days; Wallace again led the league five seasons later with 16 technicals. He used to be dubbed by NBA announcers as a "Walking Technical Foul". However, he did not get involved in the Detroit Pistons-Indiana Pacers brawl of November 19 2004 in any way other than as peacemaker, being commented on by the ESPN announcers for "doing an excellent job" at keeping the two teams separate. Later, he entered the crowd area to try and calm down Stephen Jackson and Ron Artest. Rasheed received no penalties (due to avoiding any acts of violence or rulebreaking/lawbreaking)..

Wallace participates in various community activities. The Rasheed A. Wallace Foundation was established in 1997 to assist in the recreational and educational development of youth in Philadelphia, Portland, Oregon, Durham, North Carolina, and other areas. His foundation was renamed Stand Tall With Sheed. He also adopted the 9th grade class at Kettering High School, which he promotes good attendance, citizenship, and improving academics.

Personal

In his rookie season Wallace was involved in a custody dispute with the biological mother of his son. The boy, Ismail, was living with his father and his then fiance, Fatima, before the mother of the child kidnapped him. Wallace went on TV, pleading people to help in the return of his son, and the following winter his pleading worked. A woman saw the boy and his mother, recognized him from Wallace's commercial and called the police. The boy and Wallace were reunited and he has been given custody since then. [cite news |url=http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/122697/overtime.shtml |title=Wallace involved in custody suit |date=1997-12-26 |publisher=Augusta Georgia |accessdate=2008-02-24]

Notable Moments

During a press conference following a 2003 playoff game, Wallace responded to every question asked with the answer: "Both teams played hard." During the 2008 playoffs Wallace went on a expletive laced tirade following Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Finals against the Boston Celtics in which he stated, "All that bull(expletive)-ass calls they had out there. With Mike (Callahan) and Kenny (Mauer) -- you've all seen that (expletive). You saw them calls. The cats are flopping all over the floor and they're calling that (expletive). That (expletive) ain't basketball out there. It's all (expletive) entertainment. You all should know that (expletive). It's all (expletive) entertainment." Wallace was fined $25,000 for his statement. Wallace's comments were in response to a question about flopping. Earlier that day, the NBA stated that starting with the 2008-2009 season, fines would be imposed for obvious flops.

NBA career statistics

Regular season

-
align="left" | 1995–96]
align="left" | Washington
65 || 51 || 27.5 || .487 || .329 || .650 || 4.7 || 1.3 || .6 || .8 || 10.1
-
align="left" | 1996–97
align="left" | Portland
62 || 56 || 30.5 || .558 || .273 || .638 || 6.8 || 1.2 || .8 || .9 || 15.1
-
align="left" | 1997–98
align="left" | Portland
77 || 77 || 37.6 || .533 || .205 || .662 || 6.2 || 2.5 || 1.0 || 1.1 || 14.6
-
align="left" | 1998–99
align="left" | Portland
49 || 18 || 28.9 || .508 || .419 || .732 || 4.9 || 1.2 || 1.0 || 1.1 || 12.8
-
align="left" | 1999–00
align="left" | Portland
81 || 77 || 35.1 || .519 || .160 || .704 || 7.0 || 1.8 || 1.1 || 1.3 || 16.4
-
align="left" | 2000–01
align="left" | Portland
77 || 75 || 38.2 || .501 || .321 || .766 || 7.8 || 2.8 || 1.2 || 1.8 || 19.2
-
align="left" | 2001–02
align="left" | Portland
79 || 79 || 37.5 || .469 || .360 || .734 || 8.2 || 1.9 || 1.3 || 1.3 || 19.3
-
align="left" | 2002–03
align="left" | Portland
74 || 74 || 36.3 || .471 || .358 || .735 || 7.4 || 2.1 || .9 || 1.0 || 18.1
-
align="left" | 2003–04
align="left" | Portland
45 || 44 || 37.2 || .442 || .341 || .742 || 6.6 || 2.5 || .8 || 1.6 || 17.0
-
align="left" | 2003–04
align="left" | Atlanta
1 || 1 || 42.0 || .333 || .167 || 1.000 || 6.0 || 2.0 || 1.0 || 5.0 || 20.0
-
align="left" | 2003–04
align="left" | Detroit
22 || 21 || 30.6 || .431 || .319 || .704 || 7.0 || 1.8 || 1.1 || 2.0 || 13.7
-
align="left" | 2004–05
align="left" | Detroit
79 || 79 || 34.0 || .440 || .318 || .697 || 8.2 || 1.8 || .8 || 1.5 || 14.5
-
align="left" | 2005–06
align="left" | Detroit
80 || 80 || 34.8 || .430 || .357 || .743 || 6.8 || 2.3 || 1.0 || 1.6 || 15.1
-
align="left" | 2006–07
align="left" | Detroit
75 || 72 || 32.3 || .423 || .351 || .788 || 7.2 || 1.7 || 1.0 || 1.6 || 12.3
-
align="left" | 2007–08
align="left" | Detroit
77 || 76 || 30.5 || .432 || .356 || .767 || 6.6 || 1.8 || 1.2 || 1.7 || 12.7
-
align="left" | Career
align="left" |
943 || 880 || 34.0 || .474 || .341 || .717 || 6.9 || 1.9 || 1.0 || 1.3 || 15.2
-
align="left" | All-Star
align="left" |
4 || 0 || 19.3 || .250 || .100 || .750 || 3.8 || .5 || 1.0 || .8 || 4.0
###@@@KEYEND@@@###

Playoffs

-
align="left" | 1996–97
align="left" | Portland
4 || 4 || 37.0 || .589 || .400 || .550 || 6.0 || 1.5 || .5 || .5 || 19.8
-
align="left" | 1997–98
align="left" | Portland
4 || 4 || 39.3 || .489 || .800 || .500 || 4.8 || 2.8 || .5 || .5 || 14.5
-
align="left" | 1998–99
align="left" | Portland
13 || 13 || 36.0 || .514 || .111 || .724 || 4.8 || 1.5 || 1.5 || .9 || 14.8
-
align="left" | 1999–00
align="left" | Portland
16 || 16 || 37.8 || .489 || .615 || .773 || 6.4 || 1.8 || .9 || 1.2 || 17.9
-
align="left" | 2000–01
align="left" | Portland
3 || 3 || 42.7 || .373 || .364 || .571 || 8.0 || 2.3 || .3 || 1.0 || 16.7
-
align="left" | 2001–02
align="left" | Portland
3 || 3 || 41.7 || .406 || .412 || .813 || 12.3 || 1.7 || .7 || .7 || 25.3
-
align="left" | 2002–03
align="left" | Portland
7 || 7 || 37.1 || .454 || .400 || .714 || 5.1 || 2.6 || .6 || .7 || 17.4
-
align="left" | 2003–04
align="left" | Detroit
23 || 23 || 34.9 || .413 || .243 || .767 || 7.8 || 1.6 || .6 || 2.0 || 13.0
-
align="left" | 2004–05
align="left" | Detroit
25 || 25 || 33.0 || .439 || .337 || .741 || 6.9 || 1.3 || 1.0 || 1.8 || 13.6
-
align="left" | 2005–06
align="left" | Detroit
18 || 18 || 34.9 || .430 || .405 || .527 || 6.3 || 1.8 || .6 || .8 || 14.1
-
align="left" | 2006–07
align="left" | Detroit
16 || 16 || 35.8 || .437 || .347 || .842 || 7.7 || 1.8 || 1.2 || 1.8 || 14.3
-
align="left" | 2007–08
align="left" | Detroit
17 || 17 || 34.4 || .424 || .320 || .744 || 6.4 || 1.6 || 1.1 || 1.9 || 13.2
-
align="left" | Career
align="left" |
149 || 149 || 35.6 || .447 || .350 || .710 || 6.7 || 1.7 || .9 || 1.4 || 14.8
###@@@KEYEND@@@###

References

External links

* [http://thedraftreview.com/history/drafted1995/Wallace-Rasheed.htm TheDraftReview.com - Wallace's NBA Draft History Page]
* [http://www.nba.com/playerfile/rasheed_wallace/ NBA.com Profile - Rasheed Wallace]
* [http://www.rasheedwallace.com Official Homepage]
* [http://www.need4sheed.com/ Need 4 Sheed.com - Downloads Fansite]
* [http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Loge/7346 A fansite]
* [http://www.rawallacefoundation.com The Rasheed Wallace Foundation]
* [http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/basketball/nba/players/3006/ SI.com - Pro Basketball - Rasheed Wallace Player Page]
* [http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/122697/overtime.shtml Wallace involved in custody suit - Augusta Chronicle]
* [http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/rumors/post/Rasheed-says-NBA-quot-wanted-Cavs-LeBron-in-?urn=nba,51022 Wallace's comment about the NBA]


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