Public holidays in Thailand


Public holidays in Thailand

Public holidays in Thailand

Religious

Buddhist Sabbaths, colloquial _th. วันพระ Wan Phra, are the New, First-quarter, Full, and Third-quarter Moon-days. These are "not" normally days off _th. วันหยุด wan-yoot, except for butcher, barber and beautician shops that observe the Eight Precepts. Though the Thai solar calendar days observed will vary each year, special Buddhist holidays regulated by the moon that are workweek holidays are listed in the Secular Work Holiday table, below.

Secular

Secular or time-related observances by the government of Thailand, which may or may not be of religious origin:

Weekends "are" normally days off _th. วันหยุด wan-yoot; if a workweek holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the following Monday is a compensatory day off _th. วันชดเชย Wan chod-choey.

Annual holidays and seasonal festivals collectively are called _th. วันนักขัตฤกษ์ (วันนักขัดตะเริก) Wan nak-khad-ta-roek.

: Festivals or fairs are _th. เทศกาล (เทดสะกาน) thet-sa-gan; these may be further styled as _th. ประเพณี "pra-pay-nee" "traditional"; and as _th. พิธี "pit-ti", "rite" or "ceremony". : Work holidays prescribed by the government as days off from work or school are _th. วันหยุดราชการ Wan-yoot-rat-cha-gan.

Work holidays

Other national observances

List of other observances that are not work holidays but are of national importance.

ee also

* Thai lunar calendar.
* Thai solar calendar

External links

* [http://www.thaiworldview.com/feast/feast.htm Thai Calendar 2551/2008] ; for children.
* [http://www2.thaiembdc.org/AboutEmb/EmbHolidays.aspx Public Holidays 2008 for the Royal Thai Embassy, Washington, D.C.]


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