New York's 21st congressional district


New York's 21st congressional district
New York's 21st congressional district
New York District 21 109th US Congress.png
Current Representative Paul Tonko (DAmsterdam)
Distribution 84.31% urban, 15.69% rural
Population (2000) 654,360
Median income $40,254
Ethnicity 87.0% White, 7.8% Black, 2.1% Asian, 3.2% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% other
Cook PVI D+6

The 21st Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives that contains most of the Capital District of New York. It includes all or parts of Albany, Fulton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, and Schoharie counties. It contains the cities of Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Amsterdam, Cohoes, Watervliet, Gloversville and Johnstown. Up until 1980, the district was located in upper Manhattan (including parts of Harlem and Washington Heights), and the Bronx. It is currently represented by Democrat Paul Tonko.

Contents

Components: Past and Present

  • 2003–present:
All of Albany, Montgomery, Schenectady, Schoharie
Parts of Fulton, Rensselaer, Saratoga
  • 1993-2003:
All of Albany, Schenectady
Parts of Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga
  • 1983-1993:
All of Putnam
Parts of Dutchess, Orange, Westchester
  • 1973-1983:
Parts of Bronx
  • 1971-1973:
Parts of Bronx, Manhattan, Queens
  • 1963-1971:
Parts of Bronx
  • 1913-1963:
Parts of Manhattan

List of representatives

1813 - 1821: Two seats

From the creation of the district in 1813 to 1821, two seats were apportioned, elected at-large on a general ticket.

Seat A

Representative Party Years District home Note
Samuel M. Hopkins Federalist March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1815 Le Roy/New York City[1]
Micah Brooks Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1817
Benjamin Ellicott Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819 Batavia
Nathaniel Allen Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 – March 3, 1821 Richmond

Seat B

Representative Party Years District home Note
Nathaniel W. Howell Federalist March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1815 Canandaigua
Peter Buell Porter Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 – January 23, 1816 Black Rock resigned
vacant January 23, 1816 – December 2, 1816
Archibald S. Clarke Democratic-Republican December 2, 1816 – March 3, 1817 Clarence
John C. Spencer Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819 Canandaigua
Albert H. Tracy Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 – March 3, 1821 Buffalo redistricted to 22nd district

1821 - present: One seat

Representative Party Years District home Note
Vacant March 4 - December 3, 1821 The United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 1821 were held in April, after the congressional term had already begun. It is not clear when the result was announced or the credentials were issued.
Elijah Spencer Democratic-Republican December 3, 1821 – March 3, 1823 Benton
Lot Clark Crawford DR March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825 Norwich
Elias Whitmore Adams March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1827 Windsor
John C. Clark Jacksonian March 4, 1827 – March 3, 1829 Bainbridge
Robert Monell Jacksonian March 4, 1829 – February 21, 1831 Greene resigned to become Judge of the Sixth State Circuit Court
vacant February 22, 1831 – March 3, 1831
John A. Collier Anti-Masonic March 4, 1831 – March 3, 1833 Binghamton
Henry Mitchell Jacksonian March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1835 Norwich
William Mason Jacksonian March 4, 1835 – March 3, 1837 Preston
John C. Clark Democratic March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1839 Bainbridge
John C. Clark Whig March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1843 Bainbridge reelected as a Whig
Jeremiah E. Cary Democratic March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1845 Cherry Valley
Charles Goodyear Democratic March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1847 Schoharie
George A. Starkweather Democratic March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849 Cooperstown
Hiram Walden Democratic March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1851 Wright
William W. Snow Democratic March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853 Oneonta
Henry Bennett Whig March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1857 New Berlin redistricted from 22nd district
Henry Bennett Opposition March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859 New Berlin reelected as an Opposition
Henry Bennett Republican March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859 New Berlin reelected as a Republican
R. Holland Duell Republican March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1863 Cortland
Francis Kernan Democratic March 4, 1863 – March 3, 1865 Utica
Roscoe Conkling Republican March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1867 Utica resigned after election to US Senate
vacant March 4, 1867 – November 29, 1867
Alexander H. Bailey Republican November 30, 1867 – March 3, 1871 Rome
Ellis H. Roberts Republican March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873 Utica redistricted to 22nd district
Clinton L. Merriam Republican March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875 Leyden redistricted from 20th district
Samuel F. Miller Republican March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877 Franklin
Solomon Bundy Republican March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1879 Oxford
David Wilber Republican March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881 Milford
Ferris Jacobs, Jr. Republican March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1883 Delhi
George W. Ray Republican March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1885 Norwich
Frederick A. Johnson Republican March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1887 Glens Falls redistricted from 18th district
John H. Moffitt Republican March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1891 Saranac
John M. Wever Republican March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1893 Plattsburgh redistricted to 23rd district
Simon J. Schermerhorn Democratic March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1895 Rotterdam
David F. Wilber Republican March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1899 Oneonta
John K. Stewart Republican March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1903 Amsterdam
John H. Ketcham Republican March 4, 1903 – November 4, 1906 Dover Plains redistricted from 18th district, died
vacant November 5, 1906 – March 3, 1907
Samuel McMillan Republican March 4, 1907 – March 3, 1909 Dover Plains
Hamilton Fish II Republican March 4, 1909 – March 3, 1911 Garrison
Richard E. Connell Democratic March 4, 1911 – October 30, 1912 Poughkeepsie died
vacant October 31, 1912 – March 3, 1913
Henry George, Jr. Democratic March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1915 New York City redistricted from 17th district
G. Murray Hulbert Democratic March 4, 1915 – January 1, 1918 New York City resigned to become Commissioner of Docks and Director of the Port of New York City
vacant January 2, 1918 – March 5 1918
Jerome F. Donovan Democratic March 5, 1918 – March 3, 1921 New York City
Martin C. Ansorge Republican March 4, 1921 – March 3, 1923 New York City
Royal H. Weller Democratic March 4, 1923 – March 1, 1929 New York City died
vacant March 2, 1929 – November 4, 1929
Joseph A. Gavagan Democratic November 5, 1929 – December 30, 1943 New York City resigned after being elected justice of New York Supreme Court
vacant December 31, 1943 – February 28, 1944
James H. Torrens Democratic February 29, 1944 – January 3, 1947 New York City
Jacob K. Javits Republican January 3, 1947 – December 31, 1954 New York City resigned after being elected as New York State Attorney General
vacant January 1, 1955 – January 2, 1955
Herbert Zelenko Democratic January 3, 1955 – January 3, 1963 New York City
James C. Healey Democratic January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1965 The Bronx redistricted from 22nd district
James H. Scheuer Democratic January 3, 1965 – January 3, 1973 The Bronx
Herman Badillo Democratic January 3, 1973 – December 31, 1977 The Bronx redistricted from 22nd district, resigned to become deputy mayor of New York City
vacant January 1, 1978 – February 20, 1978
Robert Garcia Democratic February 21, 1978 – January 3, 1983 The Bronx redistricted to 18th district
Hamilton Fish IV Republican January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1993 Garrison redistricted from 25th district, redistricted to 19th district
Michael R. McNulty Democratic January 3, 1993 – January 3, 2009 Troy redistricted from 23rd district
Paul Tonko Democratic January 3, 2009 – present Troy Incumbent

Election results

Note that in New York State electoral politics there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

US House election, 2008: New York District 21[2][3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Paul Tonko 105,313 61.8
Republican Jim Burhmaster 57,086 35.4
Independence Philip Steck 5,025 2.8
Majority 105,313 61.8
Turnout 167,424 100
US House election, 2006: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 167,604 78.2 +7.4
Republican Warren Redlich 46,752 21.8 -7.4
Majority 120,852 56.4 +14.8
Turnout 214,356 100 -21.8
US House election, 2004: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 194,033 70.8 -4.3
Republican Warren Redlich 80,121 29.2 +4.3
Majority 113,912 41.6 -8.6
Turnout 274,154 100 +27.6
US House election, 2002: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 161,329 75.1 +0.7
Republican Charles B. Rosenstein 53,525 24.9 -0.7
Majority 107,804 50.2 +1.4
Turnout 214,854 100 -8.8
US House election, 2000: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 175,339 74.4 +0.2
Republican Thomas G. Pillsworth 60,333 25.6 -0.2
Majority 115,006 48.8 +0.3
Turnout 235,672 100 +19.2
US House election, 1998: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 146,729 74.2 +8.1
Republican Lauren Ayers 50,931 25.8 -1.1
Majority 95,798 48.5 +9.3
Turnout 197,660 100 -17.6
US House election, 1996: New York District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Michael R. McNulty 158,491 66.1
Republican Nancy Norman 64,471 26.9
Liberal Lee H. Wasserman 16,794 7.0
Majority 94,020 39.2
Turnout 239,756 100

References

  1. ^ Hopkins had practiced law at Le Roy until 1794, then removed to New York City, but was elected in the congressional district of his old home.
  2. ^ Stanforth, Lauren; Carol DeMare (2008-11-05). "Tonko cruises to win in 21st Congressional District". Times Unions (Albany). http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=736413. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  3. ^ Neuman, William (2008-11-05). "Election Results 2008: New York". New York Times. http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/results/states/new-york.html. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 

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