Saṃsāra (Buddhism)


Saṃsāra (Buddhism)

IAST|Saṃsāra, the Sanskrit and Pāli term for "continuous movement" or "continuous flowing" refers in Buddhism to the concept of a cycle of birth (jāti) and consequent decay and death (IAST|jarāmaraṇa), in which all beings in the universe participate and which can only be escaped through enlightenment. IAST|Saṃsāra is associated with suffering and is generally considered the antithesis of IAST|nirvāṇa or nibbāna.

Buddha's View of IAST|Saṃsāra

According to the Buddha, the beginning point of IAST|Saṃsāra is not evident. It is just like finding the beginning point of a circle. All beings have been suffering in IAST|Saṃsāra for an unimaginable period, and they continue to do so until attaining of nirvana. The Assu Sutta [http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn15/sn15.003.than.html] of Pali Canon provides a great explanation of our existence in IAST|Saṃsāra:

"At Savatthi. There the buddha said: "From an inconstruable (sic) beginning comes transmigration. A beginning point is not evident, though beings hindered by ignorance and fettered by craving are transmigrating & wandering on. What do you think, monks: Which is greater, the tears you have shed while transmigrating & wandering this long, long time — crying & weeping from being joined with what is displeasing, being separated from what is pleasing — or the water in the four great oceans?"

"As we understand the Dhamma taught to us by the Blessed One, this is the greater: the tears we have shed while transmigrating & wandering this long, long time — crying & weeping from being joined with what is displeasing, being separated from what is pleasing — not the water in the four great oceans."

"Excellent, monks. Excellent. It is excellent that you thus understand the Dhamma taught by me."

"This is the greater: the tears you have shed while transmigrating & wandering this long, long time — crying & weeping from being joined with what is displeasing, being separated from what is pleasing — not the water in the four great oceans."

"Long have you (repeatedly) experienced the death of a mother. The tears you have shed over the death of a mother while transmigrating & wandering this long, long time — crying & weeping from being joined with what is displeasing, being separated from what is pleasing — are greater than the water in the four great oceans."

"Long have you (repeatedly) experienced the death of a father... the death of a brother... the death of a sister... the death of a son... the death of a daughter... loss with regard to relatives... loss with regard to wealth... loss with regard to disease. The tears you have shed over loss with regard to disease while transmigrating & wandering this long, long time — crying & weeping from being joined with what is displeasing, being separated from what is pleasing — are greater than the water in the four great oceans.""Why is that? From an inconstruable beginning comes transmigration. A beginning point is not evident, though beings hindered by ignorance and fettered by craving are transmigrating & wandering on. Long have you thus experienced stress, experienced pain, experienced loss, swelling the cemeteries — enough to become disenchanted with all fabricated things, enough to become dispassionate, enough to be released."


=IAST|Saṃsāra in Nikāya Buddhism=

Whereas in other Indian philosophies, some being (ātman, jīva, etc.) is regarded as being subject to IAST|Saṃsāra, in Buddhism the rejection of such metaphysical theories is fundamental. Buddhism accounts for the process of rebirth/reincarnation by appeal to phenomenological or psychological constituents. The basic idea that there is a cycle of birth and rebirth is, however, not questioned in early Buddhism and its successors, and neither is, generally, the concept that IAST|saṃsāra is a negative condition to be abated through religious practice concluding in the achievement of final IAST|nirvāṇa.

IAST|Saṃsāra in Mahāyāna Buddhism

According to several strands of the Mahāyāna Buddhist tradition, the division of IAST|saṃsāra and IAST|nirvāṇa is attacked using an argument that extends some of the basic premises of anātman and of Buddha's attack on orthodox accounts of existence. This is found poetically in the "Perfection of Wisdom" literature and more analytically in the philosophy of Nāgārjuna and later writers. It is not entirely clear which aspects of this theoretical move were developed first in the sutras and which in the philosophical tradition.

IAST|Saṃsāra in Tibetan Buddhism

IAST|Saṃsāra is uncontrollably recurring rebirth, filled with suffering and problems (according to Kālacakra tantra as explained by Dr. A. Berzin). In this sense, Samsara may be translated "Wheel of Suffering."

The term Samsara has been translated many ways which include but are not limited to endless suffering, cyclic existence, perpetual wandering, and transmigration. There are six realms that one can go to through this cycle of Samsara. Many believe that when one goes through the process of rebirth that they are the exact same person when they are reborn. This however, is not true. They bear many similarities with their former selves but they are not the same person. This is why many use the term reborn instead of reincarnation. The term reincarnation implies that there is a transfer of conscience or one’s soul to the new life and this is not the case in Samsara. [http://buddha101.com/buddha101/p_nirvana.htm buddha101.com] gives a good example that shows an easy way to better understand the transfer of consciousness “Like a billiard ball hitting another billiard ball. While nothing physical transfers, the speed and direction of the second ball relate directly to the first." This means the previous life has just as much impact on the new life.

There are also some who believe that Samsara is not the question but the answer to what we are doing here. They consider it to be a process to why we are here. They believe that one creates their own worlds on their way to enlightenment. Meaning when their world is starting to collapse due to their death they will create a new world and move into it. Some also believe that while they are continuing to go from world to world they encounter others who are on the same path that they are on. It is also believed that all of these different worlds impact the worlds of those who are in a similar place/path that you are on.

Buddha was the first person to grasp the belief of Samsara and figure out how to end it. He taught that the only way for one to end their journey through Samsara was enlightenment. The only person who could stop one’s cycle of Samsara was the one who was traveling through their path. Some thought that Samsara is a place and thought that it was selfish for them to be able to stop it and leave the others behind. Most believe that Samsara is a process. In this process people are being born into new lives and since it happens to everyone and everyone has the ability to escape it, it is not selfish. Being said the process of Samsara may take a long time to complete and even with no time limit there may be some who can never actually escape this endless suffering.

ee also

* Bhavacakra
* Buddhist cosmology
* Great Perfection
* Nirvana
* Rebirth (Buddhism)
* Six realms
*Wheel of Life

References


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