New York State Route 24

NYS Route 24 marker

NYS Route 24
Route information
Maintained by NYSDOT, NYCDOT, Nassau County, and Suffolk County
Length: 30.84 mi[2] (49.63 km)
Existed: 1930[1] – present
Western segment
Length: 18.68 mi[2] (30.06 km)
West end: I-295 / NY 25 in Queens
Major
junctions:
Cross Island Parkway in Queens Village
Meadowbrook Parkway in Uniondale
Wantagh Parkway in Levittown
Bethpage Parkway in Bethpage
East end: NY 110 in East Farmingdale
Eastern segment
Length: 12.16 mi[2] (19.57 km)
North end: I-495 in Calverton
Major
junctions:
CR 104 in Riverhead
CR 105 in Flanders
South end: CR 80 in Hampton Bays
Location
Counties: Queens, Nassau, Suffolk
Highway system

Numbered highways in New York
Interstate • U.S. • N.Y. (former) • Reference • County

NY 23B NY 25

New York State Route 24 (NY 24) is an east–west state highway on Long Island in New York in the United States. The route is split into two segments, with the longest and westernmost of the two extending from Interstate 295 (I-295, named the Clearview Expressway) and NY 25 (Hillside Avenue) in the Queens Village section of the New York City borough of Queens to NY 110 in East Farmingdale in the Suffolk County town of Babylon. The shorter eastern section, located in eastern Suffolk County, runs from I-495 in Calverton to County Route 80 (CR 80) in Hampton Bays.

NY 24 is one of three routes in New York that is split into two segments. The other two are NY 42 in the Catskills and NY 878 in Queens and Nassau County. Like NY 42, NY 24 was once a continuous route.

Contents

Route description

Eastbound lanes of NY 24 (Fulton Avenue) in the Village of Hempstead.

Western segment

NY 24 begins at NY 25 and I-295 in the New York City borough of Queens. NY 24 is unsigned for its first half-mile or so in Queens as one-way couplets via Hollis Court Boulevard and 212th Street. It then follows Jamaica Avenue for a block before turning onto Hempstead Avenue, where signage begins. Upon crossing the Nassau County line it becomes Hempstead Turnpike, one of the major thoroughfares of the county. It runs through many communities in the towns of Hempstead and Oyster Bay, among them the villages of Hempstead and Farmingdale and the hamlets of Elmont (accessing Belmont Racetrack along the way), East Meadow, and Levittown (as it runs through some of these towns it takes on the name Hempstead-Bethpage Turnpike). It ends shortly after entering Suffolk County at NY 110 just north of Republic Airport in Babylon.

In Farmingdale the turnpike becomes Fulton Street, then changes into Conklin Street at the junction with NY 109. Ironically, the one place between the Nassau/Queens border and the Bethpage/Farmingdale border in which the strip is not known as Hempstead Turnpike is when it is surrounded by the Village of Hempstead itself, where it is Fulton Avenue (though some street signs incorrectly designate it as Fulton Street). Nationally-known Hofstra University, which straddles Fulton Avenue and occupies land in both Hempstead Village and the hamlet of Uniondale, uses the address 1000 Fulton Avenue.

Eastern segment

The famous Big Duck.

The eastern section begins some forty miles to the east, still in Suffolk County, at exit 71 of I-495 in a rural section of the town of Brookhaven in Calverton. It overlaps CR 94 and is county maintained for several miles, passing several Suffolk County offices and a county jail just outside Riverhead in the neighboring town of Southampton. After a traffic circle just outside downtown Riverhead, NY 24 drops the CR 94 designation, although it doubles as the western terminus of New York State Bicycle Route 24. It continues southeast from Riverhead, first through the area known as Flanders, and then through Sears Bellows County Park, now home to Long Island's famed "Big Duck" (which sits directly on NY 24). Right after NYS Bike Route 24 leaves NY 24 proper for Old Riverhead Road, the highway crosses NY 27 just before its terminus at CR 80 (Montauk Highway) in Hampton Bays.

History

NY 24 was originally a continuous route between the New York City limits and Hampton Bays when it was assigned as part of the 1930 renumbering of state highways in New York.[1][3] The route was extended into New York City in mid-December 1934. It entered the city on Hempstead Avenue and followed 212th Street, Hillside Avenue, and Queens Boulevard to Skillman Avenue (NY 25). NY 24 joined NY 25 here, overlapping NY 25 (and NY 25A west of Northern Boulevard) along Queens Boulevard and across the Queensboro Bridge into Manhattan. The three routes continued west for several more blocks along 2nd Avenue and 57th Street to Park Avenue (then NY 22 and NY 100), where NY 24, NY 25, and NY 25A all ended.[4] The section of NY 24 between Farmingdale and Riverhead was removed ca. 1936, splitting NY 24 into two pieces.[5][6]

New York City and vicinity

The overlap with NY 25 was extended twice over the next decade. In the late 1930s, NY 25 was realigned to follow Queens Boulevard (NY 24) from Skillman Avenue to Horace Harding Boulevard.[7][8] It was altered again in the early 1940s to use the section of Queens Boulevard between Horace Harding Boulevard and Union Turnpike.[8][9] The concurrency was reduced slightly in the mid-1940s, however, as NY 24 was rerouted to follow the Crosstown Connecting Highway (now the right-of-way of I-278) and Midtown Highway (I-495) to the Queens–Midtown Tunnel. It then continued through the tunnel to end at NY 1A in Manhattan.[9][10] The Crosstown Connection Highway and the Midtown Highway were upgraded into the first portions of the Brooklyn–Queens Expressway (BQE) and the Queens Midtown Expressway, respectively, in the early 1950s. At the time, the Queens Midtown Expressway ended at 61st Street.[11][12]

By 1956, the highway had been renamed the Long Island Expressway (LIE) and extended east to Queens Boulevard. Although NY 24 intersected the highway twice—where it left the LIE at the BQE and at Queens Boulevard—NY 24 still followed the BQE and Queens Boulevard.[13] The portion of the LIE from Queens Boulevard to the Northern State Parkway (now exit 38) was completed in the late 1950s, at which time NY 24 was rerouted to follow the LIE between Manhattan and East Hills. The original routing of NY 24 from the BQE to Farmingdale was then redesignated as NY 24A. However, unlike NY 24 before it, NY 24A left NY 25 at the junction of Queens Boulevard and Hillside Avenue and followed Queens Boulevard and Jamaica Avenue through Queens.[14][15] The portion of NY 24 from Manhattan to the Clearview Expressway was co-signed as I-495 by 1960.[15][16]

NY 24 was removed from the LIE and shifted southward to replace NY 24A ca. 1962. However, NY 24 was truncated to begin at the LIE instead.[16][17] On January 1, 1970, NY 24 was truncated again to the junction of Queens Boulevard and Hillside Avenue. This eliminated its overlap with NY 25, which was altered to follow NY 24's former routing through Queens.[18][19] NY 24 was rerouted once more between 1977 and 1981 to follow 212th Street once again to end at NY 25 and I-295.[20][21]

Suffolk County

In Riverhead, NY 24 initially had a brief overlap with the northernmost portion of NY 113 between Riverleigh Avenue (NY 113) and Main Street (NY 25), where both terminated.[22] This concurrency was eliminated by 1970 as NY 113 was truncated to end at NY 24.[18] In the early 1970s, NY 24 was extended westward along a new divided highway following the course of the Peconic River. The roadway began at the Long Island Expressway and ended just south of Riverhead.[18][23] This segment of NY 24 is maintained by Suffolk County and is co-signed as CR 94.[24]

In the 1960s, there was a proposal to build a bypass around the current eastern terminus of the western segment of NY 24. The highway, named the "Republic Bypass", would begin at NY 24 midway between the Nassau–Suffolk County line and NY 110 and would parallel Conklin Street along its north side to Wellwood Avenue, where the bypass would merge with Long Island Avenue. The bypass was part of a plan to re-link the western and eastern segments.[25] Other proposed extensions built by Suffolk County were Suffolk Avenue (CR 100), Furrows Road, Peconic Avenue, and the formerly proposed Central Suffolk Highway (CR 90).[26] The right-of-way for the Central Suffolk Highway can be found beneath the bridge carrying CR 101 bridge over the main line of the Long Island Rail Road.[27]

Major intersections

County Location Mile[2] Destinations Notes
Queens
Queens Village 0.00 I-295 / NY 25 Southern terminus of I-295
1.75 Cross Island Parkway Exits 26B and 26C (Cross Island Parkway)
Nassau
West Hempstead 6.62 NY 102 Western terminus of NY 102
Uniondale 9.65 Meadowbrook Parkway Exits M4 and M5 (Meadowbrook Parkway)
East Meadow 11.17 NY 102 Eastern terminus of NY 102
11.94 NY 106
Levittown 12.63 Wantagh Parkway Exits W3 E and W3 W (Wantagh Parkway)
Plainedge 15.21 NY 107
Farmingdale 15.65 NY 135 Exits 7E and 7W (NY 135)
16.01 Bethpage Parkway Exit B3 (Bethpage Parkway)
16.89 NY 109 Western terminus of NY 109
Suffolk
East Farmingdale 18.68 NY 110
Gap in designation
Calverton 0.00 I-495 Exit 71 (I-495)
CDP of Riverhead CR 51 (East Moriches – Riverhead Road)
4.32 CR 104 Formerly NY 113
Flanders 5.61 CR 105 (Cross River Drive)
Hampton Bays 11.92 NY 27 Exits 65N and 65S (NY 27)
12.16 CR 80 Formerly part of NY 27A
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References

NY-blank (cutout).svg New York Roads portal
  1. ^ a b Dickinson, Leon A. (January 12, 1930). "New Signs for State Highways". The New York Times: p. 136. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F50A15F6355A147A93C0A8178AD85F448385F9. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d "2008 Traffic Volume Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2009. pp. 74–75. https://www.nysdot.gov/divisions/engineering/technical-services/hds-respository/NYSDOT%20TVR%202008%20by%20Route.pdf. Retrieved January 31, 2010. 
  3. ^ Texas Oil Company (1932). Texaco Road Map – New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  4. ^ "Mark Ways in the City". The New York Times. December 16, 1934. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0A10F63558177A93C4A81789D95F408385F9. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  5. ^ Sun Oil Company (1935). Road Map & Historical Guide – New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  6. ^ Standard Oil Company (1936). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. 
  7. ^ Esso (1938). New York Road Map for 1938 (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. 
  8. ^ a b Esso (1940). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. 
  9. ^ a b Esso (1942). New York with Pictorial Guide (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. 
  10. ^ Sinclair Oil Corporation (1947). New York Road Map and Pictorial Sight-Seeing Guide (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  11. ^ Sunoco (1952). New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  12. ^ Esso (1954). New York with Special Maps of Putnam–Rockland–Westchester Counties and Finger Lakes Region (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1955–56 ed.). 
  13. ^ Esso (1956). New York with Special Maps of Putnam–Rockland–Westchester Counties and Finger Lakes Region (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1957 ed.). 
  14. ^ Esso (1958). New York with Special Maps of Putnam–Rockland–Westchester Counties and Finger Lakes Region (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1958 ed.). 
  15. ^ a b Gulf Oil Company (1960). New York and New Jersey Tourgide Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  16. ^ a b Sunoco (1961). New York and Metropolitan New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1961–62 ed.). 
  17. ^ Esso (1962). New York with Sight-Seeing Guide (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. 
  18. ^ a b c State of New York Department of Transportation (January 1, 1970) (PDF). Official Description of Touring Routes in New York State. http://www.greaternyroads.info/pdfs/state70.pdf. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  19. ^ State of New York Department of Commerce (1969). New York State Highways (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  20. ^ Exxon (1977). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1977–78 ed.). 
  21. ^ State of New York (1981). I Love New York Tourism Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. 
  22. ^ "Long Island Magazine". Sunday Newsday (New York City): p. 14. August 27, 1972. 
  23. ^ Shell Oil Company (1973). New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1973 ed.). 
  24. ^ Yahoo! Inc. Yahoo! Maps – Riverhead, New York (Map). Cartography by NAVTEQ. http://maps.yahoo.com/#mvt=m&lat=40.912208&lon=-72.696503&zoom=15. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  25. ^ Suffolk County Department of Planning. Proposed routing of the Republic Bypass (Map). 
  26. ^ Anderson, Steve. "Suffolk County Roads 76–100". NYCRoads. http://www.nycroads.com/roads/suffolk_076-100/. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  27. ^ Suffolk CR 101-LIRR-Suffolk CR 90 Bridge (WikiMapia)

External links


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