Cervical rib

Cervical rib
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 Q76.5
ICD-9 756.2
OMIM 117900
DiseasesDB 2317
3D CT reconstruction of a cervical rib.

A cervical rib is a supernumerary (or extra) rib which arises from the seventh cervical vertebra. It is a congenital abnormality located above the normal first rib. A cervical rib is present in only about 1 in 500 (0.2%) of people;[1] in even rarer cases, an individual may have two cervical ribs. Cervical ribs are sometimes known as "neck ribs".[2]

Contents

Associated conditions

The presence of a cervical rib can cause a form of thoracic outlet syndrome due to compression of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus or subclavian artery. These structures are entrapped between the cervical rib and scalenus muscle.

Compression of the brachial plexus may be identified by weakness of the muscles around the muscles in the hand, near the base of the thumb. Compression of the subclavian artery is often diagnosed by finding a positive Adson's sign on examination, where the radial pulse in the arm is lost during abduction and external rotation of the shoulder.

It is under scientific debate to what degree children born with cervical ribs develop early childhood cancer at a higher rate than the general population [3][4]. The Hox genes that control the development of cervical vertebrae are believed to play a role in suppressing cancer.[4]

In other vertebrates

Many vertebrates, especially reptiles, have cervical ribs as a normal part of their anatomy rather than a pathological condition. Some sauropods had exceptionally long cervical ribs; those of Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis were nearly 4 meters long.

In birds, the cervical ribs are small and completely fused to the vertebrae.

In mammals the ventral parts of the transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae are the fused-on cervical ribs.

Anatomy diagrams

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cervical rib — A supernumerary (extra) rib which arises from the seventh cervical vertebra. It is located above the normal first rib. A cervical rib is present in only about 1 in 200 (0.5%) of people. It may cause nerve and artery problems. There are normally… …   Medical dictionary

  • cervical rib — noun : a supernumerary rib sometimes found in the neck above the usual first rib …   Useful english dictionary

  • cervical rib syndrome — a thoracic outlet syndrome caused by a cervical rib …   Medical dictionary

  • Rib, cervical — A extra rib which arises from the seventh cervical vertebra. It is located above the normal first rib. A cervical rib is present in only about 1 in 200 (0.5%) of people. It may cause nerve and artery problems. There are normally 12 pairs of ribs… …   Medical dictionary

  • Cervical — In anatomy, cervical is an adjective that has two meanings: of or pertaining to any neck. of or pertaining to the female cervix: i.e., the neck of the uterus. Commonly used medical phrases involving the neck are cervical collar cervical disc… …   Wikipedia

  • Rib fracture — Classification and external resources An X ray showing multiple old fractured ribs of the person s left side as marked by the oval. ICD 10 S …   Wikipedia

  • Cervical fracture — Classification and external resources A fracture of the base of the dens ( a part of C2 ) as seen on CT. ICD 10 S …   Wikipedia

  • cervical ganglion — n any of three sympathetic ganglia on each side of the neck: a) a ganglion at the top of the sympathetic chain that lies between the internal carotid artery and the second and third cervical vertebrae and that sends postganglionic fibers to the… …   Medical dictionary

  • Rib — This article is about the part of the skeleton. For other uses, see Rib (disambiguation). Single human rib detail The …   Wikipedia

  • rib — rib1 ribber, n. ribless, adj. riblike, adj. /rib/, n., v., ribbed, ribbing. n. 1. one of a series of curved bones that are articulated with the vertebrae and occur in pairs, 12 in humans, on each side of the vertebrate body, certain pairs being… …   Universalium


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