Contract city

Contract city is a term used in the U.S. for a city which provides municipal services by contract with another unit of government, public agency or private organizations.

Cities of all kinds have entered into contracts for non-core governmental services, such as facilities and grounds maintenance, auditing, legal counsel, road construction, garbage collection, water and waste water treatment, engineering services, and others. Contract cities are unique in that they rely primarily on the private sector to provide public service delivery, while the public sector maintains oversight. Public officials are specifically responsible for writing, signing, managing and enforcing contracts.

Contracting for services has been accomplished in several different methods. In the traditional method, franchising, a private company has a franchise, or legal right, to perform certain public services previously done by municipal government. Another method is for the city to contract with its county government or neighboring cities.

In 1954, Lakewood, California became the first contract city. The previously unincorporated area was facing a hostile annexation from adjacent Long Beach, California, and residents favored local control while maintaining the existing services provided by county government. The so-called Lakewood Plan has been the foundation for most new cities incorporated since then.

Over the past ten years there has been a significant increase in the number of contract cities. Several that have received prominent attention from the media include:

In contrast, independent cities are cities which provide basic governmental services themselves, without contracting. (This usage is not to be confused with the more common usage of independent city as a city that is not part of any county.) Most older cities are independent cities. In practice, many cities are hybrids of both. For instance, they may directly operate parks programs, but contract for police and fire. Most contract cities do their own land use planning, since cities were incorporated to exert local control over land use.

External links

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • City College Plymouth — logo Kings Road Centre City College Plymouth is a tertiary institution and further education college in …   Wikipedia

  • City View Charter School — Address 4174 SE Bentley Street Hillsboro, Oregon, Washington County …   Wikipedia

  • City and Westminster Properties (1934) Ltd v Mudd — Court High Court Citation(s) [1959] Ch 129 Case opinions Harman …   Wikipedia

  • City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra — Background information Origin Birmingham, England, UK Genres …   Wikipedia

  • contract bridge — [kän′trakt΄] n. a form of bridge, developed from auction bridge, in which only the number of tricks named in the contract may be counted toward a game, additional tricks being counted as a bonus score * * * ▪ 2003  For a sample contract bridge… …   Universalium

  • City Brewing Company — City Brewery Industry Alcoholic beverage Predecessor G. Heileman Brewing Company Founded 1999 Headquarters La Crosse, WI, USA Products Beer …   Wikipedia

  • City Index Group — Type Private Industry Financial Services Founded 1983 ( …   Wikipedia

  • Contract cheating — is a form of academic dishonesty in which students get others to complete their coursework for them by putting it out to tender.[1][2][3][4] The term was coined in a 2006 study[5] by Thomas Lancaster …   Wikipedia

  • City Channel Dublin — Launched 4 October 2005 Owned by City Channel Country …   Wikipedia

  • City Canal — An 1802 painting of the completed West India Docks. The City Canal is to the left of the painting. The view is looking west towards the City of London Date of act 1799 …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.