Liberty (goddess)


Liberty (goddess)

Goddesses named for and representing the concept Liberty have existed in many cultures, including classical examples dating from the Roman Empire and some national symbols such as the British "Britannia."

Classical examples

The ancient Roman goddess "Libertas" was honored during the second Punic War by a temple erected on the Aventine Hill in Rome by the father of Tiberius Gracchus. A statue in her honor was also raised by Clodius on the site of Marcus Tullius Cicero's house after it had been razed. The figure also resembles Sol Invictus, the Roman god of sun.

Neoclassical references

In 1793, during the French Revolution, the Notre Dame de Paris cathedral was turned into a "Temple to Reason" and for a time "Lady Liberty" replaced the Virgin Mary on several altars.

National embodiments of Liberty include Britannia in the United Kingdom, "Liberty Enlightening the World"," commonly known as the Statue of Liberty [Also known as "Lady Liberty," or "Goddess of Liberty"] in the United States of America, and "Marianne" in France.

Depictions

In the United States, "Liberty" is often depicted with the five-pointed American stars, usually on a raised hand. Another hand may hold a sword downward. Depictions familiar to Americans include the following:
* The monumental Statue of Liberty, which in turn has been depicted on a number of postage stamps
* Many denominations of American coinage have depicted Liberty in both bust side-view and full-figure designs
* The flags of the States of New York and New Jersey (along with various signs and government-owned items bearing the Seal of New Jersey)
* On the dome of the U.S. Capitol as Freedom
* On the dome of the Georgia State Capitol as Miss Freedom
* On the dome of the Texas State Capitol
* On the dome of the Allen County Courthouse in Fort Wayne, Indiana"'
* On the dome of the Bergen County Courthouse in Hackensack, New Jersey [ [http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/01fa/hack.html] , FDU Magazine Fall 2001 Edition. Accessed on November 11, 2007.]
* On both Union and Confederacy flags

ee also

* Columbia
* Freedom Monument
* Germania
* Goddess of Democracy
* Helvetia
* Monument of Liberty (several)
* Mother Svea
* National personification
* Statue of Liberty
* Uncle Sam

External links

* [http://www.tmm.utexas.edu/events/past_events/goddess/goddess.html Texas Memorial Museum]
* [http://www.senate.state.tx.us/kids/Tour4.htm Texas statue]
* [http://www.beeville.net/LadyJustice/index.htm Bee county courthouse in Texas]
* [http://www.caller2.com/2000/july/29/today/local_ne/619.html Another article on Beeville courthouse]
* [http://www.mackinacisland.org Mackinac Island] Mackinac Island]

References


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