Sloth (deadly sin)


Sloth (deadly sin)

In the Christian moral tradition, sloth (Latin: "acedia", "accidia", "pigritia") is one of the seven capital sins, often called the seven deadly sins; these sins are called the capital sins because they destroy charity in the person's heart and thus may lead to final impenitence and eternal death. Sloth is defined as spiritual and/or actual apathy or laziness, putting off what God asks you to do, or not doing it or anything at all. "Acedia" is a Latin word, from Greek "akedia", literally meaning "absence of caring". Acedia is also deemed to lead to God's wrath.

Sloth can also concern wasting due to lack of use or allowing entropy, expanding into almost any person, place, thing, skills, or intangible ideal that would require maintenance, refinement and/or support to continue to exist.

Several religious views concerning the need for one to work to support society and further God's plan and work by doing so reflects that by not being active alone, you invite the desire to sin on its own. "For Satan finds some mischief still for idle hands to do." ("Against Idleness and Mischief" by Isaac Watts).

ee also

* Torpor
* Ennui
* Apathy
* Melancholic Depression
* Ignorance
* Slacker
* Goofing off
* Laziness
* Irreligion
*Seven Deadly Sins
*:Lust
*:Gluttony
*:Greed
*:Sloth
*:Wrath
*:Envy
*:Pride
*Seven Heavenly Virtues (opposite of the deadly sins)
*:Chastity
*:Temperance
*:Charity
*:Diligence
*:Patience
*:Kindness
*:Humility

External links

* [http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14057c.htm "Sloth" at Catholic Encyclopedia]
* [http://www.newadvent.org/summa/303500.htm St. Thomas Aquinas on sloth]


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