Take-out


Take-out
Upper left: A Meat Feast Parmo from 'Four Seasons' in Stockton-on-Tees, UK. Upper right: Fish and chips. Lower left: Pizza delivery. Lower right: Döner kebab

Take-out or takeout (in North American, Philippine English), carry-out (in U.S., Scottish English),[1] take-away (in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Hong Kong and Ireland),[1] parcel (in Indian English and Pakistani English),[2] or tapau (in Malaysian English and Singlish—from the Chinese "package it" 打包 da-bao),[3] is food purchased at a restaurant for the purpose of being eaten elsewhere. The restaurant may or may not provide table service. In the United States and Canada, food ordered this way (especially in fast food) is ordered to go, and in the UK it is ordered to take away or sometimes to eat out, as opposed to eating in or dining in.

Take-out food is often fast food, but not always so. Whereas fast food carries the connotation of a standardized product from a globalized chain or franchise, take-away outlets are often small businesses serving traditional food, which is sometimes but by no means always of high quality. Examples include neighbourhood fish and chip shops in England, Australia and New Zealand; sandwiches sold by delis in the U.S.; kebabs sold in many countries; and the wide range of sausage-based snacks sold from stalls in German cities.

In some cases, there are facilities for customers to order food by telephone, fax, or over the Internet, to be collected or delivered. This trend is thought to be on the rise as many small businesses take to the Web to promote their take-outs. Food that is delivered by a restaurant to a customer (often called delivery) is also sometimes called take-out. Establishments that sell take-out exclusively without providing table service are called take-out restaurants or take-aways. There is no clear line between street food and take-out. Crêpe stands in France, for example, may be as permanently situated as a kiosk or newsstand, and some take-out windows (coffee, pizza, and ice cream for example) clearly expect that the food will be eaten out of its package on the street. Take-out proper may need to be unpacked and laid out, rather than eaten directly from its package.

Certain types of food that are normally served in sit-down restaurants are commonly available as take-out. Pizza is one example: some pizzerias and chains have no tables, and supply for take-out and delivery only. Another classic take-out food is Western-styled Chinese food. In the past few decades, as immigrants from more and more Asian countries emigrate to the West, more and more types of cuisine are available: Japanese, Thai, Korean, Vietnamese, etc. In the UK, South Asian food such as Indian and Pakistani cuisine is also a popular form of take-away, as well as kebabs from the Middle East. Some businesses have taken a cue from the ever increasing popularity in take-out, and have created franchises to deliver food from restaurants which do not themselves deliver. Some places give the option of dining in the restaurant or take the food away in packages. In different markets different terminology is used for this: "to take out" or "to take away", and "to eat in", in the UK and Australia; "to go" and "for here", or "to stay" or "dine in" in the USA and Canada.

References

  1. ^ a b "take•away". Oxford University Press. http://www.oup.com/oald-bin/web_getald7index1a.pl?nav=on&which_entry=037308%23x1%23x2%23takeaway&selected_word=takeaway&search_word=carry-out. Retrieved 2007-04-20. 
  2. ^ "Sunday Levity: Paradise Secured". The Acorn. http://acorn.nationalinterest.in/2007/09/09/sunday-levity-paradise-secured/. Retrieved 2008-09-01. "But we’re only here for a take-away (or parcel, in local parlance)." 
  3. ^ "Oyster yaki ala' Songkla". The Star Online. http://blog.thestar.com.my/permalink.asp?cat=23&id=11756. Retrieved 2008-09-01. "The oyster balls are served [and tapau/take-away packing] in polystyrene boxes" 

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take-out — take|out «TAYK OWT», noun. 1. that which is taken out or removed: »The city promised the takeout from the take home pay will decline to normal (New York Times). 2. a magazine article printed on full and successive pages and easily removable as a… …   Useful english dictionary

  • take|out — «TAYK OWT», noun. 1. that which is taken out or removed: »The city promised the takeout from the take home pay will decline to normal (New York Times). 2. a magazine article printed on full and successive pages and easily removable as a unit:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Take-out — auch: Take|out 〈[tɛıkaʊt] m. 6 oder n.; od. s, 〉 1. 〈Sp.; Curling〉 Treffen des gegnerischen Spielsteins, so dass er vom Mittelpunkt des Zielkreises entfernt wird 2. = Take away [zu engl. take out „entfernen, wegnehmen“] …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Take-out — 〈[tɛıkaʊt] n. od. m. od. s, s〉 1. 〈Sport; Curling〉 Treffen des gegnerischen Spielsteins, so dass er vom Mittelpunkt des Zielkreises entfernt wird 2. = Take away [Etym.: zu engl. take out »entfernen, wegnehmen«] …   Lexikalische Deutsches Wörterbuch

  • Take-out — предложение на покупку, сделанное продавцу ценных бумаг и составленное таким образом, чтобы вывести его с рынка этих ценных бумаг. См. также: Фондовые сделки Финансовый словарь Финам …   Финансовый словарь

  • take out — take (someone/something) out to kill a person or group. With automatic fire, you can take out a whole enemy squad …   New idioms dictionary

  • take out — index delete, distill, except (exclude), excise (cut away), exclude, expunge, extract, remove ( …   Law dictionary

  • take out — verb 1. cause to leave (Freq. 7) The teacher took the children out of the classroom • Syn: ↑move out, ↑remove • Hyponyms: ↑clear, ↑call in, ↑estrange …   Useful english dictionary

  • Take Out — Infobox Film name = Take Out caption = Mary Ann Emerson director = Jonathan Budine producer = Bill Hall Jonathan Budine Co Producer Jim Welsh writer = Bill Hall starring = Mary Ann Emerson Alexis Suarez Debbie Rochon music = Ray Nissen… …   Wikipedia

  • take out — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms take out : present tense I/you/we/they take out he/she/it takes out present participle taking out past tense took out past participle taken out 1) to remove something from a pocket, bag etc Henry took out his… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.