La Adelita

"La Adelita" is one of the most famous "corridos" (folk songs) to come out of the Mexican Revolution. It is the story of a young woman in love with a sergeant who travels with him and his regiment.

The song is supposed to be based on a real-life character, the identity of whom, however, has not been yet established beyond doubt. Some claim her real name was Altagracia Martinez, also known as Marieta Martinez, while others maintain she was, in fact, Adela Velarde, who actually took part in military action in the capacity of nurse, not out of infatuation with a sergeant, as a popular myth goes. [http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-21261094.html]

"La Adelita" came to be an archetype of a woman warrior in Mexico during the Mexican Revolution. An Adelita was a "soldadera", or woman soldier, who not only cooked and cared for the wounded but also actually fought in battles against Mexican government forces. In time the word adelita was used for all the soldaderas, who became a vital force in the revolutionary war efforts.

The term "La Adelita" has since come to signify a woman of strength and courage.

The music of "La Adelita" was adapted (without grater changes as a main theme of whole picutre) by Izaak Osipovich Dunayewskiy, who wrote the songs for one of the best known soviet commedies "Vesolye rebiata" (1934). The soviet composer never mentioned origins of his song.

Lyrics

External links

* [http://christine.americasfoundation.net/Kermesse/Adelita_La%20Esperanza.jpgArtist's conception of La Adelita]


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