Slang


Slang

Slang is the use of informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speaker's language or dialect but are considered more acceptable when used socially. Slang is often to be found in areas of the lexicon that refer to things considered taboo (see euphemism). It is often used to identify with one's peers and, although it may be common among young people, it is used by people of all ages and social groups.

Contents

Defining slang

Few linguists have endeavored to clearly define what constitutes slang.[1] Attempting to remedy this, Bethany K. Dumas and Jonathan Lighter argue that an expression should be considered "true slang" if it meets at least two of the following criteria:

  • It lowers, if temporarily, "the dignity of formal or serious speech or writing"; in other words, it is likely to be considered in those contexts a "glaring misuse of register."
  • Its use implies that the user is familiar with whatever is referred to, or with a group of people who are familiar with it and use the term.
  • "It is a taboo term in ordinary discourse with people of a higher social status or greater responsibility."
  • It replaces "a well-known conventional synonym". This is done primarily to avoid the discomfort caused by the conventional item or by further elaboration.[1]

Slang is different from jargon, which is the technical vocabulary of a particular profession, and which meets only the second of the criteria given above. Jargon, like many examples of slang, may be used to exclude non–group members from the conversation, but in general has the function of allowing its users to talk precisely about the technical issues in a given field.[citation needed]

Extent and origins of slang

Slang can be regional (that is, used only in a particular territory), but slang terms are often particular instead to a certain subculture, such as music or video gaming. Nevertheless, slang expressions can spread outside their original areas to become commonly used, like "cool" and "jive." While some words eventually lose their status as slang (the word "mob", for example, began as a shortening of Latin mobile vulgus[2]), others continue to be considered as such by most speakers. When slang spreads beyond the group or subculture that originally uses it, its original users often replace it with other, less-recognized terms to maintain group identity.

One use of slang is to circumvent social taboos, as mainstream language tends to shy away from evoking certain realities. For this reason, slang vocabularies are particularly rich in certain domains, such as violence, crime, drugs, and sex. Alternatively, slang can grow out of mere familiarity with the things described. Among Californian wine connoisseurs (and other groups), for example, Cabernet Sauvignon is often known as "Cab Sav," Chardonnay as "Chard" and so on;[3] this means that naming the different wines expends less superfluous effort; it also helps to indicate the user's familiarity with wine.

Even within a single language community, slang, and the extent to which it is used, tends to vary widely across social, ethnic, economic, and geographic strata. Slang may fall into disuse over time; sometimes, however, it grows more and more common until it becomes the dominant way of saying something, at which time it usually comes to be regarded as mainstream, acceptable language (e.g. the Spanish word caballo), although in the case of taboo words there may be no expression that is considered mainstream or acceptable. Numerous slang terms pass into informal mainstream speech, and sometimes into formal speech, though this may involve a change in meaning or usage.

Slang very often involves the creation of novel meanings for existing words. It is common for such novel meanings to diverge significantly from the standard meaning. Thus, "cool" and "hot" can both mean "very good," "impressive," or "good-looking".

Slang terms are often known only within a clique or ingroup. For example, Leet ("Leetspeak" or "1337") was originally popular only among certain Internet subcultures, such as crackers and online video gamers. During the 1990s, and into the early 21st century, however, Leet became increasingly more commonplace on the Internet, and it has spread outside Internet-based communication and into spoken languages.[4] Other types of slang include SMS language used on mobile phones, and "chatspeak," (e.g., "LOL", an acronym meaning "laughing out loud" or "laugh out loud" or ROFL, "rolling on the floor laughing"), which is widely used in instant messaging on the Internet.

Distinction between slang and colloquialisms

Some linguists make a distinction between slangisms (slang words) and colloquialisms. According to Ghil'ad Zuckermann, "slang refers to informal (and often transient) lexical items used by a specific social group, for instance teenagers, soldiers, prisoners and thieves. Slang is not the same as colloquial (speech), which is informal, relaxed speech used on occasion by any speaker; this might include contractions such as 'you’re,' as well as colloquialisms. A colloquialism is a lexical item used in informal speech; whilst the broadest sense of the term ‘colloquialism’ might include slangism, its narrow sense does not. Slangisms are often used in colloquial speech but not all colloquialisms are slangisms. One method of distinguishing between a slangism and the a colloquialism is to ask whether most native speakers know the word (and use it); if they do, it is a colloquialism. However, the problem is that this is not a discrete, quantized system but a continuum. Although the majority of slangisms are ephemeral and often supplanted by new ones, some gain non-slang colloquial status (e.g. English silly – cf. German selig ‘blessed’, Middle High German sælde ‘bliss, luck’ and Zelda, a Jewish female first name) and even formal status (e.g. English mob)."[5]

Etymology

The origin of the word slang is uncertain. It has a connection with Thieves' cant, and the earliest attested use (1756) refers to the vocabulary of "low or disreputable" people. Beyond that, however, its origin is unclear. A Scandinavian origin has been proposed (compare, for example, Norwegian slengenamn, which means "nickname"), but is discounted by the Oxford English Dictionary based on "date and early associations".[6]

See also

People

  • G. Vernon Bennett, Pomona, California, school superintendent, orders "anti-slang week," 1915

References

  1. ^ a b Dumas, Bethany K.; Lighter, Jonathan (1978). "Is Slang a Word for Linguists?". American Speech 53 (5): 14–15. 
  2. ^ Online Etymological Dictionary
  3. ^ Croft, William (2000) Explaining Language Change: An Evolutionary Approach. Harlow: Longman: 75-6.
  4. ^ Mitchell, Anthony (December 6, 2005). "A Leet Primer". http://www.technewsworld.com/story/47607.html#. Retrieved 2007-11-05. 
  5. ^ See p. 21 in ‘‘Language Contact and Lexical Enrichment in Israeli Hebrew’’, by Zuckermann, Ghil’ad, Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
  6. ^ "Online Etymological Dictionary". http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=slang. Retrieved 4 March 2010. ;"Oxford English Dictionary". http://dictionary.oed.com/cgi/entry/50226993?query_type=word&queryword=slang. Retrieved 4 March 2010. 

External links


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Synonyms:

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  • slang — slang …   Dictionnaire des rimes

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  • slang — 1. The term slang is first recorded in the 1750s, but it was not used by Dr Johnson in his Dictionary of 1755 nor entered in it as a headword (he used the term low word, with implications of disapproval). Nonetheless, the notion of highly… …   Modern English usage

  • slang — ● slang nom masculin (anglais slang) Nom donné à l argot dans les pays anglo saxons. ⇒SLANG, subst. masc. LINGUISTIQUE A. Ensemble des mots et expressions non conformes au bon usage ou de registre populaire, utilisés par les anglophones dans la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • slang|y — «SLANG ee», adjective, slang|i|er, slang|i|est. 1. containing slang; full of slang: »Trilby s French was…droll, slangy, piquant (George Du Maurier) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Slang — Sm saloppe Umgangssprache (bestimmter Gruppen) erw. fach. (19. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus ne. slang, dessen Herkunft nicht sicher geklärt ist. Nach DEO aus frz. dial. exlanguer schwatzen zu frz. langue Sprache ; nach Ritter aus beggar s… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Slang — (engl. slang ,saloppe Umgangssprache‘, ,Argot‘) bedeutet (Straßen )Jargon das Pseudonym Fritz Hampels (1895–1932) Außerdem ist Slang der Titel eines Albums der britischen Band Def Leppard. Siehe auch S Lang, eine Skriptsprache  Wiktionary:… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Slang — Slang, n. [Said to be of Gypsy origin; but probably from Scand., and akin to E. sling; cf. Norw. sleng a slinging, an invention, device, slengja to sling, to cast, slengja kjeften (literally, to sling the jaw) to use abusive language, to use… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slang — s.n. (lingv.) Nume dat argoului în Anglia. [pl. guri. / < engl. slang]. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DN  SLANG [SLENG] s. n. 1. ansamblu de cuvinte şi expresii de origine populară pe care englezii le folosesc în vorbirea curentă …   Dicționar Român

  • slang — [ slæŋ ] noun uncount words or expressions that are very informal and are not considered appropriate for more formal situations. Some slang is used only by a particular group of people: army/prison/Internet slang Chow is a slang word for food …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Slang — Slang, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slanged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slanging}.] To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] Every gentleman abused by a cabman or slanged by a bargee was bound there and then to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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