Clutch (eggs)

A sea turtle clutch.

A clutch of eggs refers to all the eggs produced by birds or reptiles, often at a single time, particularly those laid in a nest.

In birds, destruction of a clutch by predators, (or removal by humans, for example the California Condor breeding program), results in double-clutching. The technique is used to double the production of a species eggs, in the California Condor case, specifically to increase population size. The act of putting one's hand in a nest to remove eggs is known as dipping the clutch.

Size

Clutch size differs greatly between species, sometimes even within the same genus. It may also differ within the same species due to many factors including habitat, health, nutrition, predation pressures, and time of year[1]. Clutch size variation can also reflect variation in optimal reproduction effort. Long-lived species tend to have smaller clutch sizes than short-lived species (see also r/K selection theory). The evolution of optimal clutch size is also driven by other factors, such as parent-offspring conflict.

Clutch size recorded in ornithological field notes may or may not include lost or broken eggs.

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ Lack, David (1947): The significance of clutch-size (part I-II). Ibis 89: 302-352



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  • clutch — ‘seize’ [14] and clutch of eggs [18] are separate words, although they may ultimately be related. The verb arose in Middle English as a variant of the now obsolete clitch, which came from Old English clyccan ‘bend, clench’. The modern sense of… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

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  • Clutch — (kl[u^]ch; 224), n. [OE. cloche, cloke, claw, Scot. clook, cleuck, also OE. cleche claw, clechen, cleken, to seize; cf. AS. gel[ae]ccan (where ge is a prefix) to seize. Cf. {Latch} a catch.] 1. A gripe or clinching with, or as with, the fingers… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • clutch — Ⅰ. clutch [1] ► VERB ▪ grasp tightly. ► NOUN 1) a tight grasp. 2) (clutches) power; control. 3) a mechanism for connecting and disconnecting the engine and the transmission system in a vehicle …   English terms dictionary

  • clutch — [[t]klʌ̱tʃ[/t]] clutches, clutching, clutched 1) VERB If you clutch at something or clutch something, you hold it tightly, usually because you are afraid or anxious. [V at n] I staggered and had to clutch at a chair for support... [V n] She was… …   English dictionary

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  • clutch — clutch1 clutchingly, adv. clutchy, adj. /kluch/, v.t. 1. to seize with or as with the hands or claws; snatch: The bird swooped down and clutched its prey with its claws. 2. to grip or hold tightly or firmly: She clutched the child s hand as they… …   Universalium


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