Grapevine (gossip)


Grapevine (gossip)

"See also Chinese whispers."

To hear something through the grapevine is to learn of something informally and unofficially by means of gossip and rumour.

The usual implication is that the information was passed person to person by word of mouth, perhaps in a confidential manner among friends or colleagues. It can also imply an overheard conversation or anonymous sources of information. For instance "I heard through "the grapevine" that Brad was getting fired."

A study quoted in "Forbes" magazine concludes that 75 percent of employees hear about matters first through rumors on the grapevine. Robbins states that rumors flourish in an organization because of three elements. They are a response to situations that are "important" to employees, where there is some "ambiguity", and under conditions that arouse "anxiety". From a management perspective, the grapevine acts as a filter and a feedback mechanism to identify issues that employees consider important and relevant.

According to Robbins, the grapevine in an organization has three significant characteristics.
#It is not controlled by formal management.
#Most employees perceive it to be more believable and reliable than formal communication issued by top management.
#It is largely used for the self-interests of the people within the organization.

Managers can use the grapevine to: [ [http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4422/is_4_19/ai_88253005 Tell it to the grapevine: to get the word out, no other medium communicates news more quickly] , Lorenzo Sierra, Communication World, June-July, 2002.]
* get a feel for the morale of the organization
* understand the anxieties of the work force
* evaluate formal communication efforts and see if they are working.

Origin of the term

In the autobiography of Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery, Washington says that slaves in the South kept up-to-date on current events by "what was termed the 'grape-vine' telegraph." He said,

According to Jitendra Mishra: [ [http://www.analytictech.com/mb119/grapevine-article.htm Managing the grapevine.] , Jitendra Mishra, Public Personnel Management.]

The term gained a boost in popularity through its use in the Motown song "I Heard It Through the Grapevine", a major hit single for both Marvin Gaye and Gladys Knight & the Pips in the late 1960s.AVINASH KUMAR PG08019 FROM INMANTEC GHAZIABAD TELLSGRAPEVINE * GRAPEVINE IS AN INORMAL CHANNEL OF COMMUNICATION * PRIMARILY A CHANNEL OF HORIZONTAL COMMUNICATION, IT CAN EVEN FLOW VERTICALLY AND DIAGONALLY * OF FOUR TYPES : - SINGLE STRAND : FLOWS LIKE A CHAIN - GOSSIP : ONE PERSON TELLS EVERYBODY - PROBABILITY : INFORMATION MAY FLOW (RANDOM) FROM ANYBODY TO ANYBODY - CLUSTER : MOVES THRO’ SELECTED GROUPS * ITS IMPORTANCE - EMOTIONAL RELIEF - HARMONY AND COHESIVENESS IN THE ORGANISATION - SUPPLEMENT TO OTHER CHANNELS - A FAST CHANNEL - PROVIDES FEEDBACK * DEMERITS : - DISTORTION OF INFORMATION - MAY TRANSMIT INCOMPLETE INFORMATION - TRAVELS WITH DESTRUCTIVE SWIFTNESS

ee also

*"Heard It Through the Grapevine". (February 10, 1997). "Forbes", pp. 22
*Robbins, Stephen; "Essentials of Organizational Behavior" (8th ed.) New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-144571-5.

References


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Grapevine — The term Grapevine may refer to:* Grapevine, common name for plants of the genus Vitis *Grapevine (gossip), term often used to describe a form of informal communication, as in heard it through the grapevine *Grapevine (dance move), a step pattern …   Wikipedia

  • gossip — [n1] talk about others; rumor account, babble, back fence talk*, blather, blether, buzz*, calumny, chatter, chitchat*, chronicle, clothesline*, conversation, cry, defamation, dirty laundry*, dirty linen*, dirty wash*, earful*, grapevine*, hearsay …   New thesaurus

  • grapevine — or grapevine telegraph [grāp′vīn΄] n. 1. any of the woody vines that bear grapes ☆ 2. a secret means of spreading or receiving information; also, the spreading of news or gossip from one person to another: with the …   English World dictionary

  • Gossip — This article is about the type of conversation. For other uses, see Gossip (disambiguation). Gossip is idle talk or rumour, especially about the personal or private affairs of others, It is one of the oldest and most common means of sharing facts …   Wikipedia

  • grapevine — n. circulation of rumors, gossip by, through the grapevine (to hear news through the grapevine) * * * through the grapevine (to hear news through the grapevine) [ circulation of rumors, gossip ] by …   Combinatory dictionary

  • gossip — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. busybody, talebearer, chatterer; reports, rumors. v. i. talk, report, tattle, whisper. See curiosity, information, speech, news. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Local, petty talk] Syn. babble, chatter,… …   English dictionary for students

  • grapevine — /ˈgreɪpvaɪn / (say graypvuyn) noun 1. a vine that bears grapes. 2. Colloquial the network of personal and other contacts through which information ranging from gossip to substantive information is passed informally: to hear something on the… …   Australian English dictionary

  • grapevine — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n., informal, rumor; rumor mill, pipeline, a little bird. See information. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [Vine] Syn. climber, creeper, trailer; see vine . 2. [Gossip, used with the ] Syn. rumor, the grapevine… …   English dictionary for students

  • gossip — Synonyms and related words: Paul Pry, Peeping Tom, a tale bearing animal, account, ace, amigo, associate, babble, babblement, back fence gossip, banter, bavardage, be closeted with, bedfellow, bedmate, bibble babble, blab, blabber, blabbermouth,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • grapevine — Gen Mgt an informal communication network within an organization that conveys information through unofficial channels independent of management control. Information travels much more quickly through the grapevine than through formal channels and… …   The ultimate business dictionary


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