Misconduct

A misconduct is a legal term meaning a wrongful, improper, or unlawful conduct motivated by premeditated or intentional purpose or by obstinate indifference to the consequences of one's acts.

Two categories of misconduct are sexual misconduct and of course official misconduct. In connection with school discipline, "misconduct" is generally understood to be student behavior that is unacceptable to school officials but does not violate criminal statutes, including absenteeism, tardiness, bullying, and inappropriate language. (Special Education Dictionary, 2003, LRP Publications) Misconduct in the workplace generally falls under two categories. Minor misconduct is seen as unacceptable but is not a criminal offense (e.g. being late). Gross misconduct can lead to dismissal, (e.g. stealing or sexual harassment).

Misconduct

  • "Misconduct" is where something is seen as unacceptable but is not a criminal offence e.g. deceptive manipulation.
  • "Gross misconduct" can lead to immediate dismissal because it is serious enough and possibly criminal, e.g. stealing or sexual harassment.

Misconduct refers to an action, rather than neglecting to take action, or inaction which could be referred to as poor performance.[citation needed]

Examples of gross misconduct

  • Being drunk on duty
  • Illegal drug use at work
  • Fighting
  • Harassing people
  • Stealing
  • Subjecting people to racial abuse
  • Cursing/Swearing at the officials in sports
  • Cutting school (Truancy)



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  • misconduct — mis‧con‧duct [ˌmɪsˈkɒndʌkt ǁ ˈkɑːn ] noun [uncountable] formal bad or dishonest behaviour by a professional person: • the penalties for such misconduct as fraudulent trading or theft ˌgross misˈconduct HUMAN RESOURCES …   Financial and business terms

  • misconduct — mis·con·duct /mis kän dəkt/ n: intentional or wanton wrongful but usu. not criminal behavior: as a: deliberate or wanton violation of standards of conduct by a government official b: wrongful behavior (as adultery) by a spouse that leads to the… …   Law dictionary

  • Misconduct — auf der Building Bridges Europa Tour (2006) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Misconduct — Mis*con duct, n. 1. Wrong conduct; bad behavior; mismanagement. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. Unlawful or unethical conduct by a person holding a public office or having a position of responsibility in the administration of justice; malfeasance; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Misconduct — Mis con*duct , v. t. To conduct amiss; to mismanage. Johnson. [1913 Webster] {To misconduct one s self}, to behave improperly. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • misconduct — ► NOUN ▪ unacceptable or improper behaviour. ► VERB (misconduct oneself) ▪ behave in an improper manner …   English terms dictionary

  • Misconduct — Mis con*duct , v. i. To behave amiss. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • misconduct — (n.) 1710, bad management, neglect; see MIS (Cf. mis ) (1) + CONDUCT (Cf. conduct) (n.). Meaning wrong conduct is attested from 1729 …   Etymology dictionary

  • misconduct — [n] bad or unethical behavior delinquency, dereliction, evil, immorality, impropriety, malfeasance, malpractice, malversation, misbehavior, mischief, misdemeanor, misdoing, mismanagement, naughtiness, offense, rudeness, transgression, wrongdoing; …   New thesaurus

  • misconduct — [mis΄kən dukt′; ] for n. [ mis kän′dukt] vt. 1. to manage badly or dishonestly 2. to conduct (oneself) improperly n. 1. unlawful, bad, or dishonest management, esp. by a governmental or military official; specif., malfeasance 2. willfully… …   English World dictionary


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