List of Doges of Venice


List of Doges of Venice

The following is a list of all 120 of the Doges of Venice ordered by the dates of their reigns which are put in parentheses.

For more than 1,000 years, the chief magistrate and leader of the city of Venice and later of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the "Doge", a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux. Doges of Venice were elected for life by the city-state's aristocracy. Commonly the person selected as Doge was one of the shrewdest elders in the city. The Venetian combination of elaborate monarchic pomp and a republican (though "aristocratic") constitution with intricate checks and balances makes "La serenissima" (Venice) a textbook example of a crowned republic.

Despite the great power given to them, the Venetian Doges were restricted by law (unlike the Doges of the Republic of Genoa) to spend the rest of their lives inside the Doge's Palace complex and St Mark's Basilica, occasionally leaving for diplomatic reasons.

Seventh century

* Paolo Lucio Anafesto (697–717)

Eighth century

* Marcello Tegalliano (717–726)
* Orso Ipato (726–737) assassinated perhaps at the instigation of Eutychius, Exarch of Ravenna
* Brief Interregnum (737–742)
* Teodato Ipato (742–755) deposed, blinded, and exiled
* Galla Gaulo (755–756) deposed, blinded, and exiled
* Domenico Monegario (756–764) deposed, blinded, and exiled
* Maurizio Galbaio (764–787)
* Giovanni Galbaio (787–804) fled to Mantua in 803 with family, where they all probably died

Ninth century

* Obelerio Antenoreo (804–811) exiled, attempted to return to power, killed & head displayed in the market
* Angelo Participazio (811–827) forced into exile at Zara by his eldest son Giustiniano
* Giustiniano Participazio (827–829)
* Giovanni I Participazio (829–837) arrested, and tonsured (head shaved like monk)
* Pietro Tradonico (837–864) assassination, although in this case his successor arrested and executed the assassins
* Orso I Participazio (864–881)
* Giovanni II Participazio (881–887) resigned due to poor health
* Pietro I Candiano (887–888) killed in open battle while invading the Narentines
* Pietro Tribuno (888–912)

Tenth century

* Orso II Participazio (912–932)
* Pietro II Candiano (932–939)
* Pietro Participazio (939–942)
* Pietro III Candiano (942–959)
* Pietro IV Candiano (959–976) People of Venice locked him in palace with son while it burned.
* Pietro I Orseolo (976–978) resigned to become a Camaldolese hermit in Abbey of Sant Miguel de Cuxa in the Pyrenees
* Vitale Candiano (978–979)
* Tribuno Memmo (979–991)
* Pietro II Orseolo (991–1009) gave the majority of his wealth to the poor and the Church, and retired to a monastery

Eleventh century

* Otto Orseolo (1009–1026) arrested, beard shaved, and banished to Constantinople for nepotism. He was the father of King Peter Urseolo of Hungary.
* Pietro Barbolano (1026–1032) abdicated under heavy pressure to reinstate Otto Orseolo
* Domenico Flabanico (1032–1043)
* Domenico Contarini (1043–1071)
* Domenico Selvo (1071–1084) deposed peacefully to a monastery because of naval defeat, died three years later
* Vitale Faliero (1084–1096)
* Vitale I Michiel (1096–1102)

Twelfth century

* Ordelafo Faliero (1102–1117)
* Domenico Michele (1117–1130)
* Pietro Polani (1130–1148)
* Domenico Morosini (1148–1156)
* Vital II Michele (1156–1172)
* Sebastiano Ziani (1172–1178)
* Orio Mastropiero (1178–1192)
* Enrico Dandolo (1192–1205)

Thirteenth century

* Pietro Ziani (1205–1229)
* Jacopo Tiepolo (1229–1249)
* Marino Morosini (1249–1252)
* Reniero Zeno (1252–1268)
* Lorenzo Tiepolo (1268–1275)
* Jacopo Contarini (1275–1280)
* Giovanni Dandolo (1280–1289)
* Pietro Gradenigo (1289–1311)

Fourteenth century

* Marino Zorzi (1311–1312)
* Giovanni Soranzo (1312–1328)
* Francesco Dandolo (1328–1339)
* Bartolomeo Gradenigo (1339–1342)
* Andrea Dandolo (1342–1354)
* Marino Faliero (1354–1355) - convicted of treason, executed and condemned to damnatio memoriae
* Giovanni Gradenigo (1355–1356)
* Giovanni Dolfin (1356–1361)
* Lorenzo Celsi (1361–1365)
* Marco Cornaro (1365–1367)
* Andrea Contarini (1367–1382)
* Michele Morosini (1382–1382)
* Antonio Venier (1382–1400)
* Michele Steno (1400–1413)

Fifteenth century

* Tommaso Mocenigo (1413–1423)
* Francesco Foscari (1423–1457) - forced to abdicate by the Council of Ten
* Pasquale Malipiero (1457–1462)
* Cristoforo Moro (1462–1471)
* Nicolo Tron (1471–1473)
* Nicolo Marcello (1473–1474)
* Pietro Mocenigo (1474–1476)
* Andrea Vendramin (1476–1478)
* Giovanni Mocenigo (1478–1485)
* Marco Barbarigo (1485–1486)
* Agostino Barbarigo (1486–1501)

Sixteenth century

* Leonardo Loredan (1501–1521)
* Antonio Grimani (1521–1523)
* Andrea Gritti (1523–1538)
* Pietro Lando (1538–1545)
* Francesco Donato (1545–1553)
* Marcantonio Trivisan (1553–1554)
* Francesco Venier (1554–1556)
* Lorenzo Priuli (1556–1559)
* Girolamo Priuli (1559–1567)
* Pietro Loredan (1567–1570)
* Alvise I Mocenigo (1570–1577)
* Sebastiano Venier (1577–1578)
* Nicolò da Ponte (1578–1585)
* Pasqual Cicogna (1585–1595)
* Marino Grimani (1595–1606)

Seventeenth century

* Leonardo Donato (1606–1612)
* Marcantonio Memmo (1612–1615)
* Giovanni Bembo (1615–1618)
* Nicolò Donato (1618–1618)
* Antonio Priuli (1618–1623)
* Francesco Contarini (1623–1624)
* Giovanni Corner (1624–1630)
* Nicolò Contarini (1630–1631)
* Francesco Erizzo (1631–1646)
* Francesco Molin (1646–1655)
* Carlo Contarini (1655–1656)
* Francesco Corner (1656–1656)
* Bertuccio Valiero (1656–1658)
* Giovanni Pesaro (1658–1659)
* Domenico II Contarini (1659–1674)
* Nicolò Sagredo (1674–1676)
* Luigi Contarini (1676–1683)
* Marcantonio Giustinian (1683–1688)
* Francesco Morosini (1688–1694)
* Silvestro Valiero (1694–1700)
* Alvise II Mocenigo (1700–1709)

Eighteenth century

* Giovanni Corner (1709–1722)
* Sebastiano Mocenigo (1722–1732)
* Carlo Ruzzini (1732–1735)
* Alvise Pisani (1735–1741)
* Pietro Grimani (1741–1752)
* Francesco Loredan (1752–1762)
* Marco Foscarini (1762–1763)
* Alvise Giovanni Mocenigo (1763–1779)
* Paolo Renier (1779–1789)
* Ludovico Manin (1789–1797) - forced to abdicate by Napoleon

References

* Norwich, John Julius. "A History of Venice". New York: Vintage Books, 1989. ISBN 0-679-72197-5.


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