Nehemiah


Nehemiah

Nehemiah (pronounced /ˌniːəˈmaɪə/ or /ˌniːhəˈmaɪə/; נְחֶמְיָה, "Comforted of/is the LORD (YHWH)," Standard Hebrew Nəḥemya, Tiberian Hebrew Nəḥemyāh) is the central figure of the Book of Nehemiah, which describes his work rebuilding Jerusalem and purifying the Jewish community. He was the son of Hachaliah, (Neh. 1:1) and probably of the Tribe of Judah, and his career took place probably in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Contents

Personal story

Nehemiah rebuilding Jerusalem

In the 20th year of Artaxerxes, king of Persia, (445/444 BC), Nehemiah was cup-bearer to the king. Learning that the walls of Jerusalem were broken down he asked the king for permission to return and rebuild them, and Artaxerxes sent him to Judah as governor of the province with a mission to rebuild the walls. Once there he defied the opposition of Judah's enemies on all sides - Samaritans, Ammonites, Arabs and Philistines - and rebuilt the walls within 52 days, from the Sheep Gate in the North, the Hananel Tower at the North West corner, the Fish Gate in the West, the Furnaces Tower at the Temple Mount's South West corner, the Dung Gate in the South, the East Gate and the gate beneath the Golden Gate in the East.

He then took measures to repopulate the city and purify the Jewish community, enforcing the cancellation of debt, assisting Ezra to promulgate the law of Moses, and enforcing the divorce of Jewish men from their non-Jewish wives.

After 12 years as governor, during which he ruled with justice and righteousness, he returned to the king in Susa. After some time in Susa he returned to Jerusalem, only to find that the people had fallen back into their evil ways. Non-Jews were permitted to conduct business inside Jerusalem on the Sabbath and to keep rooms in the Temple. Greatly angered, he purified the Temple and the priests and Levites and enforced the observance of the law of Moses.

Book of Nehemiah

Although there is some disagreement that a genuine memoir underlies the Book of Nehemiah,[1] the historical context of Nehemiah's mission was the Persians' need for increased security in the Levant and enhancement of Imperial control in the light of the serious revolt which broke out in Egypt in the middle of the 5th century BC.[2] The basic memoir can be no earlier than about 400 BC. The editorial process extended the original report of Nehemiah's wall-building activities first with an account of the restoration and reform of the community of Israel.[3] In the final phase Ezra was combined with Nehemiah, and the role of Ezra was minimized in favor of that of Nehemiah.[4]

Rabbinic literature

Nehemiah is identified in one haggadah with Zerubbabel, the latter name being considered an epithet of Nehemiah and as indicating that he was born at Babylon ("Zera'+ Babel"; Sanh. 38a). With Ezra, he marks the spring-time in the national history of Judaism (Cant. R. ii. 12). A certain mishnah is declared by the Rabbis to have originated in the school of Nehemiah (Shab. 123b). Still, Nehemiah is blamed by the Rabbis for his seemingly boastful expression, "Think upon me, my God, for good" (Neh. v. 19, xiii. 31), and for his disparagement of his predecessors (ib. v. 15), among whom was Daniel. The Rabbis think that these two faults were the reason that this book is not mentioned under its own name, but forms part of the Book of Ezra (Sanh. 93b). According to B. B. 15a Nehemiah completed the Book of Chronicles, which was written by Ezra.

In non-Hebrew literature, such as the Septuagint and the Vulgate, Nehemiah was regarded as a eunuch. The Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, describes him as a eunochos (eunuch), rather than an oinochoos. However, other Biblical scholars have argued that the existing manuscripts of the Septuagint mistranslated the Hebrew word for "cupbearer". According to the Torah, no one whose testicles are crushed or whose penis is cut off shall be admitted to the assembly of the Lord. Thus, those individuals who speculate that Nehemiah was a eunuch, have attempted to bolster their claims by noting that Nehemiah could not enter certain areas of the temple. His enemy Shemaiah attempted to trick him into doing so. Another explanation is that Nehemiah was not a priest and was not authorized to go into those portions of the Temple reserved for the priests. Nehemiah prayed repeatedly: Remember for my good, O my God, all that I have done for this people.

See also

References

  1. ^ Lester Grabbe, Ezra, in Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible (ed. James D. G. Dunn, John William Rogerson, Eerdmans, 2003) p.320-1
  2. ^ Entry: Persia at the Holman Bible Dictionary
  3. ^ Wright, Jacob, "Rebuilding identity: the Nehemiah-memoir and its earliest readers" (Walter de Gruyter, 2004) p.340
  4. ^ Pakkala, Juha, "Ezra the scribe: the development of Ezra 7-10 and Nehemiah 8" (Walter de Gryter, 2004) pp.225-7

This article incorporates text from Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897), a publication now in the public domain.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • NEHEMIAH — (Heb. נְחֶמְיָה; YHWH has comforted : fifth century B.C.E.), cupbearer of artaxerxes I and later governor of Judah. Nothing is known of the parentage of Nehemiah except that he was the son of Hacaliah. Two other persons of that name are mentioned …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Nehemiah — 1 Nehemiah 2 Nehemiah 3 Nehemiah 4 Nehemiah 5 Nehemiah 6 Nehemiah 7 Nehemiah 8 Nehemiah 9 Nehemiah 10 Nehemiah 11 Nehemiah 12 …   The King James version of the Bible

  • NEHEMIAH — (middle of second century C.E.), tanna. Nehemiah was considered one of Akiva s outstanding disciples and is mentioned in all the talmudic traditions that described the reestablishment of the center of learning in Galilee after the Bar Kokhba… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Nehemiah — masc. proper name, Jewish leader under Persian king Artaxerxes, from Hebrew Nehemyah, lit. the Lord comforts …   Etymology dictionary

  • Nehemiah — [nē΄hi mī′ə, nē΄əmī′ə] n. [Heb nehemyāh, lit., comfort of Jah (God)] Bible 1. a Hebrew leader of c. 5th cent. B.C. 2. the book that tells of his work: abbrev. Ne or Neh …   English World dictionary

  • Nehemiah — Nehemia steht für: Nehemia, ein biblisches Buch Nehemiah ist der Name folgender Personen: Nehemiah Abbott (1804 1877), amerikanischer Politiker Nehemiah Green (1837 1890), amerikanischer Politiker Nehemiah Grew (1641–1712), britischer Botaniker… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nehemiah — /nee euh muy euh/, n. 1. a Hebrew leader of the 5th century B.C. 2. a book of the Bible bearing his name. Abbr.: Neh. 3. a male given name. Also, Douay Bible, Nehemias /nee euh muy euhs/ (for defs. 1, 2). * * * flourished 5th century BC Jewish… …   Universalium

  • Nehemiah —    Comforted by Jehovah.    1) Ezra 2:2; Neh. 7:7.    2) Neh. 3:16.    3) The son of Hachaliah (Neh. 1:1), and probably of the tribe of Judah. His family must have belonged to Jerusalem (Neh. 2:3). He was one of the Jews of the dispersion, and in …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Nehemiah 12 — 1 Now these are the priests and the Levites that went up with Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, and Jeshua: Seraiah, Jeremiah, Ezra, 2 Amariah, Malluch, Hattush, 3 Shechaniah, Rehum, Meremoth, 4 Iddo, Ginnetho, Abijah, 5 Miamin, Maadiah, Bilgah, 6 …   The King James version of the Bible

  • Nehemiah — (fl. 5th cent BCE)    Israelite, governor of Judah. He was a cupbearer to the Persian king Artaxerxes I, of whom he asked permission to go to Jerusalem. The king agreed, and appointed him governor of Judah. Nehemiah organized the repair of the… …   Dictionary of Jewish Biography


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