Politics of Niger


Politics of Niger

Politics of Niger takes place in a framework of a semi-presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Niger is head of state and the Prime Minister of Niger head of government, and of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the National Assembly. The judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature.

The current legislature elected in December 2004 contains seven political parties. President Mamadou Tandja was re-elected in December 2004 and reappointed Hama Amadou as Prime Minister. Mahamane Ousmane, the head of the CDS, was re-elected President of the National Assembly (parliament) by his peers. The new second term government of the Fifth Republic took office on 30 December 2002. In August 2002, serious unrest within the military occurred in Niamey, Diffa, and Nguigmi, but the government was able to restore order within several days. In June 2007, a no confidence vote against the government led to the fall of the Prime Minister Hama Amadou and his ministers.

Constitution

The constitution of December 1992 was revised by national referendum on 12 May 1996 and, again, by referendum, recised to the current version on 18 July 1999. It restored the semi-presidential system of government of the December 1992 constitution (Third Republic) in which the president of the republic, elected by universal suffrage for a five-year term, and a prime minister named by the president share executive power. As a reflection of Niger's increasing population, the unicameral National Assembly was expanded in 2004 to 113 deputies elected for a 5 year term under a majority system of representation. Political parties must attain at least 5% of the vote in order to gain a seat in the legislature.

Executive branch

President
Tandja Mamadou
MNSD
22 December 1999
-
Prime Minister
Seyni Oumarou
MNSD
7 June 2007
Niger's new constitution restores the semi-presidential system of government of the December 1992 constitution (Third Republic) in which the President of the Republic is elected by universal suffrage for a five-year term, and a prime minister, named by the president, share executive power.

Legislative branch

The National Assembly ("Assemblée Nationale") has 113 members, elected for a five year term, 105 members elected in multi-seat constituencies and 8 members elected in single-seat national minority constituencies. Political parties must attain at least 5% of the vote in order to gain a seat in the legislature.

Political parties and elections

Judicial branch

Niger's independent judicial system is composed of four higher courts — the Court of Appeals, the Supreme Court, the High Court of Justice and the Court of State Security.

Administrative divisions

The country is currently divided into eight regions (Agadez, Diffa, Dosso, Maradi, Niamey*, Tahoua, Tillaberi, Zinder), which are subdivided into 36 districts (departments). Administrative powers will eventually be distributed among 265 communes. The Constitution also provides for the popular election of municipal and local officials, which are expected to take place after all political interests agree upon a governmental decentralization plan. The country is currently divided into 8 departments, which are subdivided into 36 districts (arrondissements). The chief administrator (prefet) in each territorial unit is appointed by the government and functions primarily as the local agent of the central authorities. 256 communes, or local councils, are planned and are the closest thing in Niger to a city.

International organization participation

Niger is member of ACCT, ACP, AfDB, CCC, ECA, ECOWAS, Entente, FAO, FZ, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICFTU, ICRM, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, Intelsat, Interpol, IOC, ITU, MIPONUH, NAM, OAU, OIC, OPCW, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WADB, WAEMU, WCL, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO, WTrO


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