Udaloy class destroyer

History

The "Udaloy" class are a series of anti-submarine destroyers built for the Soviet Navy - The Russian designation is Project 1155 Fregat (Frigate bird).The Project 1155 dates to the 1970s when it was concluded that it was too costly to build large-displacement, multi-role combatants. The concept of a specialized surface ship was developed by Soviet designers. Two different types of warships were laid down which were designed by the Severnoye Design Bureau: Project 956 destroyer and Project 1155 large antisubmarine ship. Generally the Soviet equivalent of the American Spruance class destroyer, there are variations in SAM and air search radar among units of the class. Based on the Krivak class, the emphasis on ASW left these ships with limited anti-surface and anti-air capabilities.

Udaloy II

Following Udaloy's commissioning, designers began developing an upgrade package in 1982 to provide more balanced capabilities. The Project 1155.1 Fregat II Class Large ASW Ships (NATO Codename Udaloy II), Russia's only multipurpose destroyer, is intended to be the Russian counterpart to the American Arleigh Burke class ships. The Udaloy-II is modified by the replacement of the SS-N-14 by the SS-N-22, reflecting a change in emphasis from ASW to anti-shipping, however, her standoff ASW capability is retained by firing SS-N-15 missiles from the torpedo tubes. Other changes include an improved self defense capability with the addition of the gun/SAM CIWS systems. Similar to Udaloy externally, it was a new configuration with the Moskit antiship missiles, a twin 130 mm gun, the Udav antitorpedo system and several anti-aircraft systems. Powered by a modern gas-turbine engine, it was equipped with more capable sonars, an integrated air defense fire control system, and a number of digital electronic systems based on state-of-the-art circuitry.

In 2006 it was reported by Jane's that the Navy was to place the Northern Fleet's Project 1155 Udaloy I-class destroyer "Admiral Kharlamov" into reserve in the face of delayed funding for a planned overhaul and upgrade programme. [ http://www.janes.com/defence/naval_forces/news/jdi/jdi060815_1_n.shtml - Delayed funding forces Russian destroyer into reserve Article from Jane's, 15 August 2006]

hips

* "Udaloy" I class
**"Udaloy" (1980) - Removed from service, scrapped at Murmansk in 2002
**"Vice-Admiral Kulakov" (1980) - In overhaul since 1990 and did not return to service
**"Marshal Vasil'yevsky" (BPK 499) (1982)
**"Admiral Zakharov" (1982) - Caught fire in 1992 and scrapped
**"Admiral Spiridonov" (1983) - Removed from service
**"Admiral Tributs" (1983)- Russian Pacific Fleet, caught fire in 1991, but returned to service
**"Marshal Shaposhnikov" (BPK 543) (1985) - Russian Pacific Fleet, caught fire Sept. 2008, damage unknown, presumed heavy
**"Severomorsk" (1985) - Northern Fleet
**"Admiral Levchenko" (BPK 605) (1987) - Northern Fleet
**"Admiral Vinogradov" (BPK 405) (1987) - Russian Pacific Fleet
**"Admiral Kharlamov" (1988) - Northern Fleet, in reserve, 2006 (see above)
**"Admiral Panteleyev" (BPK 548) (1990) - Russian Pacific Fleet
* "Udaloy" II class
**"Admiral Chabanenko" (BPK 437) (1995) - Northern Fleet
**"Admiral Basisty" (scrapped during construction)
**"Admiral Kucherov" (never laid down)

References

*http://ship.bsu.by/main.asp?id=100894 - article in Russian
*http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/row/rus/1155_1.htm - Article from FAS in English
*http://home19.inet.tele.dk/airwing/ships/udaloy.htm - article in English
*http://www.kommersant.com/tree.asp?rubric=3&node=44&doc_id=610715 - one of several articles referring to the "Admiral Tributs" in service, although it is commonly believed to have never returned to service after a 1991 fire.

External links

* [http://www.maritimequest.com/warship_directory/russia/destroyer_index.htm Maritimequest Russian Destroyer Index]


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