Vanuatuan literature

Vanuatuan literature is diverse. The emergence of Vanuatuan written literature (as distinct from oral literature) took place in the context of the development of indigenous Pacific Islander literature in the Pacific region as a whole, beginning in the late 1960s. In 1968, the founding of the University of the South Pacific in Suva provided a stimulus for Pacific Islander literary aspirations. Creative writing courses and workshops were set up. The South Pacific Arts Society was founded at the University in 1973, and published Pacific Islander literature (poetry and short stories) in the magazine Pacific Islands Monthly. In 1974, the Society founded the publishing house Mana Publications, followed in 1976 by the art and literature journal Mana. The journal published the first anthologies of ni-Vanuatu poetry.[1]

Arguably Vanuatu's foremost literary figure was feminist poet Grace Molisa (1946-2002).[2] The Australian has described her poems as "a biting social commentary on life in patriarchal, post-colonial Vanuatu."[3] She wrote both in English and in Bislama.

Vanuatu's literary scene is also notable for the Wan Smolbag community theatre group, established in 1989. The group writes and performs plays, in English and in Bislama, addressing educational topics such as "malaria and AIDS prevention, hurricane preparedness and domestic violence". Wan Smolbag performs regional tours in the South Pacific, and its plays are available on video throughout the region, where they are used for educational purposes.[4] [5] [6] The theatre describes itself as using "drama to inform, raise awareness and encourage public discussion on a range of contemporary health, lifestyle, environment and governance issues".[7]

References

  1. ^ "English in the South Pacific", John Lynch and France Mugler, University of the South Pacific
  2. ^ "English in the South Pacific", John Lynch and France Mugler, University of the South Pacific
  3. ^ "Voice of Vanuatu's women", The Australian, February 1, 2002
  4. ^ "Wan Smolbag Theatre: Working with Communities through Drama", UNESCO, April 4, 2005
  5. ^ "English in the South Pacific", John Lynch and France Mugler, University of the South Pacific
  6. ^ "Wan Smol Bag", Veronica McCarthy, Al Jazeera, January 29, 2007
  7. ^ Wan Smolbag Theatre website



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