Postage stamps and postal history of Nepal

A corner block of eight Nepali stamps from 1881.

This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of Nepal.

The first stamps of Nepal on cover.
A 9 rupees revenue stamp of Nepal for court fees.

Contents

First stamps

The first Nepalese were issued in April 1881 as a set of three which were valued at one anna, two annas and four annas. These were initially perforated and printed on European made paper. Within a few months they were released imperforate. In 1886 they were reprinted on hand made Nepalese paper. Numerous printings of these first three values on the local paper were made for postal use until 1907 when new European manufactured stamps picturing the god, Pashupati were issued. The remainders of first three values were brought out of storage and reissued for telegraph use in 1917. Several more telegraph era printings followed. The last of these printings was in 1929.[1]

UPU membership

Nepal became a member of the Universal Postal Union (UPU) on 11 October 1956,[2] which became effective from 14 April 1959.

References and sources

Notes
  1. ^ Hellrigl, Wolfgang C.; Vignola, Frank (May 1984). The Classic Stamps of Nepal. Bozen, Italy: Nepal Tibet Philatelic Study Circle. pp. 27, 32, 40, 45-50. 
  2. ^ "Universal Postal Union – Nepal". Universal Postal Union. 2011 [last update]. http://www.upu.int/en/the-upu/member-countries/southern-asia-and-oceania/nepal.html. Retrieved 18 March 2011. 
Sources
  • Shrestha, Dr. Ramesh. Nepalese Postal History from the earliest times until 1959. Kathmandu, Nepal: Kazi Madhusudan Rajbhandary, 2009.

Further reading

  • Shestra, Ramesh (2009). Nepalese Postal History: from the earliest time until 1959. Nepal. 
  • Hellrigl, Wolfgang; Hepper, Colin (1978). The Native Postmarks of Nepal. Peterborough, UK: Nepal and Tibet Philatelic Study Circle. 
  • Dawson, L.E.; Smythies, E.A.; Haverbexck, H.D.S. (1952). The Postage Stamps of Nepal. New York: The Collectors Club. 
  • Hepper, Colin (2011). The Sri Pashupati Issues of Nepal. Peterborough, UK: Nepal and Tibet Philatelic Study Circle. 

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.