National Register of Historic Places listings in Hennepin County, Minnesota

Hennepin County, Minnesota contains 142 properties and historic districts that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A significant number of National Register properties in Hennepin County are a result of the establishment of Fort Snelling, the development of water power at Saint Anthony Falls, and the thriving city of Minneapolis that grew up around the falls. Many historic sites outside Minneapolis city limits are associated with pioneers who established missions, farms, and schools in areas that are now suburbs in a major metropolitan area.

Contents

Historical background

Hennepin County

Father Louis Hennepin was the first European explorer to visit and name Saint Anthony Falls, the tallest waterfall on the Mississippi River, in 1680. While the falls were familiar to the Ojibwe and Sioux Indians who lived in the area, Father Hennepin spread word of the falls when he returned to France in 1683. The land east of the Mississippi came under England's control in 1763, and then became American territory after the American Revolutionary War in 1783. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, the western side of the falls became American territory as well.[1]

Zebulon Pike explored the Mississippi River in 1805 and made a treaty with the Sioux to acquire land on either side of the Mississippi River from its confluence with the Minnesota River to Saint Anthony Falls. The United States did not do much to occupy the land until 1819, when Lieutenant Colonel Henry Leavenworth was ordered to establish a military post in the area. The following year, Colonel Josiah Snelling established a permanent fort at a blufftop site overlooking Pike Island and the confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers. The fort, first named Fort Saint Anthony and later Fort Snelling, became an island of civilization in the wilderness.[1]

In 1837, Franklin Steele established a claim for the land on the east side of Saint Anthony Falls. Within the next ten years, he established a sawmill at the falls, and lumbermen from the north began cutting trees and sending them to Steele's sawmill. In 1849, Steele subdivided his property and filed a plat for the town of Saint Anthony. Sawmilling and early flour milling attempts proved successful, and by 1855 the fledgling town of Saint Anthony had more than three thousand residents.[1] The west side of the river was part of the Fort Snelling military reservation until it was released for development in 1854. In 1849, John H. Stevens obtained 160 acres (0.65 km2) of land on the west side of the falls in exchange for maintaining a ferry at the falls. Hennepin County was established in 1852, and the settlement on the west side of the river was given the name Minneapolis, as coined by Charles Hoag. The two towns prospered as a result of industries and businesses based around the falls, but business was better on the west side of the falls. Minneapolis incorporated as a city in 1867, and three years later it merged with the village of Saint Anthony.[1]

Eventually, flour mills overtook sawmills as a dominant industry at the falls. In 1860, flour production stood at 30,000 barrels; it reached 256,100 barrels in 1869. By 1874, Charles A. Pillsbury and Company owned five mills at the falls, and in 1879, Washburn-Crosby Company (now General Mills) owned four mills. The former Washburn "A" Mill building on the west side of the falls exploded on May 2, 1878, but its owners quickly rebuilt the west side district, including a new, larger Washburn "A" Mill. Meanwhile, in 1880, Pillsbury began building the huge Pillsbury "A" Mill on the east side of the falls. It had a capacity of 4,000 barrels per day when it first opened.[2] Improvements in milling technology made it possible to grind the tougher spring wheat into a finer product, producing Minnesota "patent" flour, the finest bread flour in the world at that time. By 1900, Minneapolis was grinding 14.1 percent of the world's grain.[3]

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted November 10, 2011.[4]

Current listings

[5] Landmark name Image Date listed Location City or town Summary
1 Abbott Hospital
Abbott Hospital
02011-06-01June 1, 2011 110 E. 18th St.
44°57′56″N 93°16′34″W / 44.965556°N 93.276111°W / 44.965556; -93.276111 (Abbott Hospital)
Minneapolis Hospital building built in five phases between 1910 and 1958, showing an architectural view of the progression of the medical industry[6]
2 Advance Thresher/Emerson-Newton Implement Company
Advance Thresher/Emerson-Newton Implement Company
01977-09-20September 20, 1977 700-704 S. 3rd St.
44°58′37″N 93°15′30″W / 44.976903°N 93.258467°W / 44.976903; -93.258467 (Advance Thresher/Emerson-Newton Implement Company)
Minneapolis Commercial buildings influenced by Louis Sullivan, with Classical Revival-style ornamentation[7]
3 Ames-Florida House
Ames-Florida House
01979-10-16October 16, 1979 8131 Bridge St.
45°05′12″N 93°43′54″W / 45.086703°N 93.731589°W / 45.086703; -93.731589 (Ames-Florida House)
Rockford House built by George F. Ames and Joel Florida, the founders of Rockford, in 1856. They produced all the structural materials on site and built their own furniture.[8]
4 Anoka-Champlin Mississippi River Bridge
Anoka-Champlin Mississippi River Bridge
01979-12-31December 31, 1979 U.S. Route 169
45°11′25″N 93°23′45″W / 45.190394°N 93.395894°W / 45.190394; -93.395894 (Anoka-Champlin Mississippi River Bridge)
Champlin Bridge built in 1929, was torn down to its piers and rebuilt.
5 Architects and Engineers Building
Architects and Engineers Building
01984-02-23February 23, 1984 1200 2nd Ave., S.
44°58′15″N 93°16′25″W / 44.970836°N 93.273658°W / 44.970836; -93.273658 (Architects and Engineers Building)
Minneapolis Renaissance Revival-style building with offices and shared spaces for design professionals[9]
6 George W. Baird House
George W. Baird House
01980-03-27March 27, 1980 4400 W. 50th St.
44°54′46″N 93°20′12″W / 44.912786°N 93.336725°W / 44.912786; -93.336725 (George W. Baird House)
Edina Brick farmstead built in 1886 by prominent farmer in the Edina Mills community[10]
7 Bardwell-Ferrant House
Bardwell-Ferrant House
01984-08-09August 9, 1984 2500 Portland Ave., S.
44°57′22″N 93°15′59″W / 44.956°N 93.266489°W / 44.956; -93.266489 (Bardwell-Ferrant House)
Minneapolis Queen Anne-style house with a Moorish Revival makeover[11]
8 Riley Lucas Bartholomew House
Riley Lucas Bartholomew House
01978-11-28November 28, 1978 6901 Lyndale Ave., S.
44°52′38″N 93°17′17″W / 44.877269°N 93.288153°W / 44.877269; -93.288153 (Riley Lucas Bartholomew House)
Richfield 1852 home built by early Richfield settler, legislative representative, and a framer of the state constitution[12]
9 Basilica of St. Mary
Basilica of St. Mary
01975-03-26March 26, 1975 Hennepin Ave. at 16th St.
44°58′23″N 93°17′09″W / 44.973058°N 93.285969°W / 44.973058; -93.285969 (Basilica of St. Mary)
Minneapolis Beaux-Arts basilica; by same architect as the Cathedral of St. Paul[13]
10 Bennett-McBride House
Bennett-McBride House
01977-09-19September 19, 1977 3116 3rd Ave., S.
44°56′45″N 93°16′23″W / 44.945722°N 93.273031°W / 44.945722; -93.273031 (Bennett-McBride House)
Minneapolis Queen Anne style house with a variety of turned, sawn, and beaded wood ornament[14]
11 Fredrika Bremer Intermediate School
Fredrika Bremer Intermediate School
01978-01-31January 31, 1978 1214 Lowry Ave., N.
45°00′49″N 93°17′42″W / 45.013722°N 93.294928°W / 45.013722; -93.294928 (Fredrika Bremer Intermediate School)
Minneapolis One of the oldest (1888) school buildings in Minneapolis.
12 Charles H. Burwell House
Charles H. Burwell House
01974-05-02May 2, 1974 County Highway 5 and McGinty Rd.
44°56′30″N 93°26′52″W / 44.941569°N 93.447669°W / 44.941569; -93.447669 (Charles H. Burwell House)
Minnetonka Home of the secretary and manager of the Minnetonka Mills company[15]
13 Butler Brothers Company
Butler Brothers Company
01971-03-11March 11, 1971 518 1st Ave., N.
44°58′30″N 93°16′04″W / 44.974992°N 93.267781°W / 44.974992; -93.267781 (Butler Brothers Company)
Minneapolis Outstanding work of the career of Harry Wild Jones; 1976 renovation paved the way for more historic building renovations in Minneapolis[16]
14 Cahill School
Cahill School
01970-10-09October 9, 1970 Eden Ave. and Minnesota Highway 100
44°54′43″N 93°21′00″W / 44.911936°N 93.349894°W / 44.911936; -93.349894 (Cahill School)
Edina Oldest standing building in Edina; used as a school from 1864 until 1958[17]
15 Calhoun Beach Club
Calhoun Beach Club
02003-12-23December 23, 2003 2730 W. Lake St.
44°57′10″N 93°18′38″W / 44.9529°N 93.310678°W / 44.9529; -93.310678 (Calhoun Beach Club)
Minneapolis Lakeside beach club combining residences, entertainment, and recreational facilities in one building; once served as a hotel and as radio and TV studios[18][19]
16 Cappelen Memorial Bridge
Cappelen Memorial Bridge
01978-11-28November 28, 1978 Franklin Ave. and the Mississippi River
44°57′53″N 93°13′16″W / 44.964739°N 93.221136°W / 44.964739; -93.221136 (Cappelen Memorial Bridge)
Minneapolis Elegant concrete arch bridge spanning the Mississippi River and final work of Minneapolis city engineer Frederick William Cappelen[20]
17 Elbert L. Carpenter House
Elbert L. Carpenter House
01977-09-13September 13, 1977 314 Clifton Ave.
44°58′00″N 93°17′02″W / 44.966581°N 93.283781°W / 44.966581; -93.283781 (Elbert L. Carpenter House)
Minneapolis Georgian Revival brick house built in 1906 for the organizer of the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra[21]
18 Eugene J. Carpenter House
Eugene J. Carpenter House
01977-09-13September 13, 1977 300 Clifton Ave.
44°57′59″N 93°16′59″W / 44.966403°N 93.283019°W / 44.966403; -93.283019 (Eugene J. Carpenter House)
Minneapolis Georgian Revival house built by Edwin H. Hewitt for a lumberman and patron of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts[21]
19 Cedar Avenue Bridge
Cedar Avenue Bridge
01989-11-06November 6, 1989 10th Ave. over the Mississippi River
44°58′31″N 93°14′45″W / 44.975311°N 93.245778°W / 44.975311; -93.245778 (Cedar Avenue Bridge)
Minneapolis Monumental reinforced concrete arch bridge spanning high above the Mississippi River; crowning achievement of architect Kristoffer Olsen Oustad[22]
20 Cedar Square West
Cedar Square West
02010-12-28December 28, 2010 1600 S. Sixth St.
44°58′07″N 93°14′54″W / 44.968611°N 93.248333°W / 44.968611; -93.248333 (Cedar Square West)
Minneapolis Nationally significant example of urban "New Towns-In Town" redevelopment under Title VII of the National Urban Policy and New Community Development Act of 1970[23]
21 Loren L. Chadwick Cottages
Loren L. Chadwick Cottages
01984-02-09February 9, 1984 2617 W. 40th St.
44°55′49″N 93°18′50″W / 44.930406°N 93.313764°W / 44.930406; -93.313764 (Loren L. Chadwick Cottages)
Minneapolis Two small cottages built as part of a planned development of cottages between Lake Calhoun and Lake Harriet[24]
22 Chamber of Commerce Building
Chamber of Commerce Building
01977-11-23November 23, 1977 400 4th St., S.
44°58′39″N 93°15′49″W / 44.977611°N 93.263544°W / 44.977611; -93.263544 (Chamber of Commerce Building)
Minneapolis First skyscraper in Minneapolis with an all-steel frame, designed by Kees and Colburn[25]
23 Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Grade Separation
Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Grade Separation
02005-06-01June 1, 2005 Parallel to 29th St. between Humboldt and 20th Aves., S.
44°57′03″N 93°16′18″W / 44.950833°N 93.271667°W / 44.950833; -93.271667 (Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Grade Separation)
Minneapolis Grade-separated railroad corridor mandated by the City of Minneapolis to route the Milwaukee Road railroad tracks below street level and eliminate grade crossings[26]
24 Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot
01969-11-25November 25, 1969 W. 37th St. and Brunswick Ave.
44°56′13″N 93°21′28″W / 44.937025°N 93.357903°W / 44.937025; -93.357903 (Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot)
St. Louis Park Eastlake style railroad depot built in 1887[27]
25 Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot Freight House and Train Shed
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot Freight House and Train Shed
01978-11-28November 28, 1978 201 3rd Ave., S.
44°58′47″N 93°15′44″W / 44.979722°N 93.262222°W / 44.979722; -93.262222 (Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Depot Freight House and Train Shed)
Minneapolis Large Renaissance Revival passenger depot and freight house; train shed is one of only a dozen remaining in the United States[28]
26 Christ Church Lutheran
Christ Church Lutheran
02001-06-20June 20, 2001 3244 34th Ave., S
44°56′38″N 93°13′24″W / 44.943761°N 93.223208°W / 44.943761; -93.223208 (Christ Church Lutheran)
Minneapolis Eliel Saarinen-designed modern-style church,[29] designated a National Historic Landmark in 2009[30]
27 Church of St. Stephen (Catholic)
Church of St. Stephen (Catholic)
01991-08-15August 15, 1991 2201 Clinton Ave., S.
44°57′39″N 93°16′15″W / 44.960761°N 93.270819°W / 44.960761; -93.270819 (Church of St. Stephen (Catholic))
Minneapolis Richardsonian Romanesque church designed by Frederick G. Corser and built in 1889-1991[31]
28 Amos B. Coe House
Amos B. Coe House
01984-01-12January 12, 1984 1700 S. 3rd Ave.
44°57′58″N 93°16′23″W / 44.966247°N 93.273128°W / 44.966247; -93.273128 (Amos B. Coe House)
Minneapolis Eastlake Style brick house built for a Minneapolis real estate dealer[32]
29 Como-Harriet Streetcar Line and Trolley
Como-Harriet Streetcar Line and Trolley
01977-10-17October 17, 1977 42nd St., W. and Queen Ave., S.
44°55′59″N 93°18′30″W / 44.933031°N 93.308203°W / 44.933031; -93.308203 (Como-Harriet Streetcar Line and Trolley)
Minneapolis Preserved segment of a streetcar line that operated between 1880 and 1954, now operated by the Minnesota Transportation Museum[33]
30 Country Club Historic District
Country Club Historic District
01982-04-26April 26, 1982 Roughly bounded by 45th St., Arden Ave., 50th St., and Browndale Ave.44°54′59″N 93°20′32″W / 44.91639°N 93.34222°W / 44.91639; -93.34222 (Country Club Historic District)
Edina Early planned community designed around the automobile, with high architectural design standards; helped to establish Edina's reputation as one of the Twin Cities' ritziest suburbs[34]
31 Crane Island Historic District
Crane Island Historic District
01991-08-05August 5, 1991 Crane Island in Lake Minnetonka
44°54′02″N 93°39′45″W / 44.900556°N 93.6625°W / 44.900556; -93.6625 (Crane Island Historic District)
Minnetrista Summer resort community in Lake Minnetonka with individually-owned cottages and common spaces, built largely before 1915[21]
32 John R. Cummins Farmhouse
John R. Cummins Farmhouse
01982-09-02September 2, 1982 13600 Pioneer Trail
44°49′48″N 93°26′56″W / 44.829939°N 93.448828°W / 44.829939; -93.448828 (John R. Cummins Farmhouse)
Eden Prairie Brick farmhouse combining Greek Revival and Italianate styles built by a local horticulturalist[35]
33 B. O. Cutter House
B. O. Cutter House
01976-01-30January 30, 1976 400 10th Ave., SE.
44°58′58″N 93°14′26″W / 44.982883°N 93.240675°W / 44.982883; -93.240675 (B. O. Cutter House)
Minneapolis House built by a master carpenter with intricate hand-carved moldings; later sold to John Gilfillan, a regent of the University of Minnesota and a member of the House of Representatives[36]
34 East Lake Branch Library
East Lake Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 2916 E. Lake St.
44°56′56″N 93°13′44″W / 44.948792°N 93.228806°W / 44.948792; -93.228806 (East Lake Branch Library)
Minneapolis Former Minneapolis branch library with hints of Tudor Revival styling[37]
35 Eitel Hospital
Eitel Hospital
02007-12-27December 27, 2007 1367 Willow St.
44°58′09″N 93°16′54″W / 44.969167°N 93.281667°W / 44.969167; -93.281667 (Eitel Hospital)
Minneapolis Established by a doctor as "a first rate hospital" adjacent to Loring Park, with beautifully furnished private rooms[38]
36 Excelsior Public School
Excelsior Public School
01980-11-13November 13, 1980 261 School Ave.
44°54′05″N 93°33′53″W / 44.901442°N 93.564642°W / 44.901442; -93.564642 (Excelsior Public School)
Excelsior Georgian Revival school building with bell tower built in 1899-1901,[39] once considered the finest rural school in Hennepin County[40]
37 Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank
Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank
01984-01-12January 12, 1984 115 S. 4th St.
44°58′43″N 93°16′03″W / 44.978683°N 93.267608°W / 44.978683; -93.267608 (Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank)
Minneapolis Beaux-Arts/Classical Revival-styled bank building[39]
38 Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank
Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank
02006-03-02March 2, 2006 88 S. 6th St.
44°58′39″N 93°16′12″W / 44.977597°N 93.269886°W / 44.977597; -93.269886 (Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank)
Minneapolis Moderne-style bank building with sculptures of a farmer and a mechanic; now converted to a hotel[41]
39 Fire Station No. 19
Fire Station No. 19
01982-01-14January 14, 1982 2001 University Ave., SE.
44°58′35″N 93°13′35″W / 44.976253°N 93.226253°W / 44.976253; -93.226253 (Fire Station No. 19)
Minneapolis Queen Anne Style firehouse built in 1893; birthplace of kittenball, forerunner of modern softball.[39]
40 First Church of Christ, Scientist
First Church of Christ, Scientist
01986-06-20June 20, 1986 614-620 E. 15th St.
44°58′06″N 93°15′58″W / 44.968333°N 93.266039°W / 44.968333; -93.266039 (First Church of Christ, Scientist)
Minneapolis Beaux-Arts style church building; first Christian Science church in the Upper Midwest[39]
41 First Congregational Church
First Congregational Church
01979-01-15January 15, 1979 500 8th Ave., SE.
44°59′07″N 93°14′34″W / 44.985219°N 93.242778°W / 44.985219; -93.242778 (First Congregational Church)
Minneapolis Richardsonian Romanesque church designed by Warren H. Hayes, built in 1886[39]
42 First National Bank-Soo Line Building
First National Bank-Soo Line Building
02008-05-12May 12, 2008 101 S. 5th St.
44°58′42″N 93°16′09″W / 44.978248°N 93.269248°W / 44.978248; -93.269248 (First National Bank-Soo Line Building)
Minneapolis Designed by École des Beaux-Arts-trained architect Robert Gibson, incorporating Second Renaissance Revival details; tallest building in Minneapolis when built in 1915[42]
43 Woodbury Fisk House
Woodbury Fisk House
01983-10-06October 6, 1983 424 5th St., SE.
44°59′11″N 93°14′52″W / 44.986469°N 93.247856°W / 44.986469; -93.247856 (Woodbury Fisk House)
Minneapolis Italian villa-style house built in 1870 for a partner in a local flour milling firm[43]
44 Flour Exchange Building
Flour Exchange Building
01977-08-29August 29, 1977 310 4th Ave., S.
44°58′44″N 93°15′55″W / 44.978869°N 93.265325°W / 44.978869; -93.265325 (Flour Exchange Building)
Minneapolis Long and Kees-designed brick office building inspired by Chicago skyscrapers[25]
45 Fort Snelling
Fort Snelling
01966-10-15October 15, 1966 Bounded by Minnehaha Park, the Mississippi River, the airport, and Bloomington Rd.
44°53′35″N 93°11′23″W / 44.893056°N 93.189722°W / 44.893056; -93.189722 (Fort Snelling)
Minneapolis First American fort in modern Minnesota, spurring the development of the Northwest region; also marked the transition of the United States Army from a small frontier force into a major army[44][45]; listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1960[30]
46 Fort Snelling-Mendota Bridge
Fort Snelling-Mendota Bridge
01978-12-01December 1, 1978 Minnesota Highway 55 over the Mississippi River
44°53′15″N 93°10′39″W / 44.8875°N 93.1775°W / 44.8875; -93.1775 (Fort Snelling-Mendota Bridge)
Minneapolis 4,119-foot (1,255 m) reinforced concrete arch bridge, the longest continuous concrete arch bridge in the world when built in 1925[46]
47 Foshay Tower
Foshay Tower
01978-09-20September 20, 1978 821 Marquette Ave.
44°58′28″N 93°16′16″W / 44.974533°N 93.271139°W / 44.974533; -93.271139 (Foshay Tower)
Minneapolis Office building modeled after the Washington Monument; was the tallest building in Minneapolis for over 40 years[47]
48 Lawrence A. and Mary Fournier House
Lawrence A. and Mary Fournier House
01995-05-18May 18, 1995 3505 Sheridan Ave. N.
45°01′08″N 93°18′40″W / 45.018903°N 93.311072°W / 45.018903; -93.311072 (Lawrence A. and Mary Fournier House)
Minneapolis Bungalow mixing Prairie School and Arts and Crafts styles, designed by draftsman who later worked with Purcell and Elmslie[48]
49 Fowler Methodist Episcopal Church
Fowler Methodist Episcopal Church
01976-01-30January 30, 1976 2011 Dupont Ave., S.
44°57′45″N 93°17′33″W / 44.962508°N 93.292511°W / 44.962508; -93.292511 (Fowler Methodist Episcopal Church)
Minneapolis Romanesque Revival church with two massive stone towers[49]
50 Franklin Branch Library
Franklin Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 1314 W. Franklin Ave.
44°57′47″N 93°15′20″W / 44.963047°N 93.255617°W / 44.963047; -93.255617 (Franklin Branch Library)
Minneapolis 1914 building is oldest of three existing Carnegie libraries in Minneapolis[50]
51 Gethsemane Episcopal Church
Gethsemane Episcopal Church
01984-03-08March 8, 1984 901-905 4th Ave., S.
44°58′21″N 93°16′04″W / 44.972381°N 93.267831°W / 44.972381; -93.267831 (Gethsemane Episcopal Church)
Minneapolis One of the oldest churches in Minneapolis, significant for its Gothic Revival style[51]
52 Peter Gideon Farmhouse
Peter Gideon Farmhouse
01974-09-17September 17, 1974 24590 Glen Rd.
44°54′15″N 93°35′30″W / 44.904186°N 93.591775°W / 44.904186; -93.591775 (Peter Gideon Farmhouse)
Shorewood Home of a horticulturalist who bred winter-hardy apples in Minnesota[52]
53 Glen Lake Children's Camp
Glen Lake Children's Camp
01999-08-05August 5, 1999 6350 Indian Chief Rd.44°53′14″N 93°27′54″W / 44.88722°N 93.465°W / 44.88722; -93.465 (Glen Lake Children's Camp)
Eden Prairie Minnesota's only known surviving summer camp for children with tuberculosis[53]
54 John G. and Minnie Gluek House and Carriage House
John G. and Minnie Gluek House and Carriage House
01990-02-09February 9, 1990 2447 Bryant Ave., S.
44°57′28″N 93°17′24″W / 44.957744°N 93.28995°W / 44.957744; -93.28995 (John G. and Minnie Gluek House and Carriage House)
Minneapolis House built in the Victorian style with Georgian Revival elements; owner was a son of prominent Minnesota brewery owners[54]
55 Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church
Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church
01997-01-09January 9, 1997 324 Harvard St., SE.
44°58′22″N 93°13′50″W / 44.972822°N 93.230486°W / 44.972822; -93.230486 (Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church)
Minneapolis Gothic Revival church built in 1915-17 by a Swedish Lutheran congregation to serve university students[52]
56 Great Northern Railroad Depot
Great Northern Railroad Depot
01981-07-07July 7, 1981 402 E. Lake St.
44°58′07″N 93°31′03″W / 44.968489°N 93.517594°W / 44.968489; -93.517594 (Great Northern Railroad Depot)
Wayzata Wood-framed depot built in 1906 to serve commuter and resort traffic to a Lake Minnetonka town[52]
57 Jonathan Taylor Grimes House
Jonathan Taylor Grimes House
01976-03-16March 16, 1976 4200 W. 44th St.
44°55′20″N 93°19′54″W / 44.922342°N 93.331711°W / 44.922342; -93.331711 (Jonathan Taylor Grimes House)
Edina Gothic Revival house built in 1869 by an agriculturist who introduced ginkgo and catalpa trees to Minnesota.[52]
58 Hagel Family Farm
Hagel Family Farm
02006-12-27December 27, 2006 11475 Tilton Trail, S.
45°09′46″N 93°34′05″W / 45.162778°N 93.568056°W / 45.162778; -93.568056 (Hagel Family Farm)
Hassan Township 150-year old farmstead with a high degree of historic integrity[55]
59 Hanover Bridge
Hanover Bridge
01979-12-11December 11, 1979 Off County Highway 19 over the Crow River
45°09′13″N 93°39′41″W / 45.153517°N 93.661519°W / 45.153517; -93.661519 (Hanover Bridge)
Rogers One of the last remaining wrought iron pin-connected Pratt truss bridges in the state[56]
60 Healy Block Residential Historic District
Healy Block Residential Historic District
01993-05-27May 27, 1993 3101-3145 2nd Ave., S. and 3116-3124 3rd Ave., S.
44°56′44″N 93°16′27″W / 44.9455°N 93.274167°W / 44.9455; -93.274167 (Healy Block Residential Historic District)
Minneapolis Group of 14 Queen Anne style houses by builder Theron P. Healy; readily visible from Interstate 35W[14]
61 Hennepin County Library
Hennepin County Library
01978-10-02October 2, 1978 4915 N. 42nd Ave.
45°01′52″N 93°20′31″W / 45.031147°N 93.341986°W / 45.031147; -93.341986 (Hennepin County Library)
Robbinsdale Local library built in 1925 by Robbinsdale Library Club[57]
62 Hennepin Theatre
Hennepin Theatre
01996-01-19January 19, 1996 910 Hennepin Ave.
44°58′36″N 93°16′39″W / 44.976769°N 93.277492°W / 44.976769; -93.277492 (Hennepin Theatre)
Minneapolis Renovated vaudeville theater and the largest of three restored theaters on Hennepin Avenue; elaborately decorated interior with terra cotta sculptures[58]
63 Edwin H. Hewitt House
Edwin H. Hewitt House
01978-04-06April 6, 1978 126 E. Franklin Ave.
44°57′47″N 93°16′29″W / 44.963003°N 93.274636°W / 44.963003; -93.274636 (Edwin H. Hewitt House)
Minneapolis House built by a local architect blending Arts and Crafts and Tudor Revival styles[59]
64 Hinkle-Murphy House
Hinkle-Murphy House
01984-09-20September 20, 1984 619 10th St., S.
44°58′12″N 93°15′56″W / 44.970044°N 93.265539°W / 44.970044; -93.265539 (Hinkle-Murphy House)
Minneapolis Finest example of a Georgian Revival mansion in Minneapolis[60]
65 Intercity Bridge
Intercity Bridge
01989-11-06November 6, 1989 Ford Parkway over the Mississippi River
44°55′04″N 93°12′14″W / 44.917825°N 93.20385°W / 44.917825; -93.20385 (Intercity Bridge)
Minneapolis The most classical looking monumental concrete deck arch bridge crossing the Mississippi River in Minneapolis-St. Paul[56]
66 Interlachen Bridge
Interlachen Bridge
01989-11-06November 6, 1989 William Berry Dr. over a Minnesota Transportation Museum street railway track in William Berry Park
44°55′53″N 93°18′31″W / 44.931319°N 93.308572°W / 44.931319; -93.308572 (Interlachen Bridge)
Minneapolis Built in 1900 and virtually unaltered since then; earliest documented reinforced concrete bridge in Minnesota[61]
67 Harry W. Jones House
Harry W. Jones House
01976-06-07June 7, 1976 5101 Nicollet Ave.
44°54′37″N 93°16′39″W / 44.910333°N 93.277425°W / 44.910333; -93.277425 (Harry W. Jones House)
Minneapolis Shingle Style house built by Harry Wild Jones, one of the city's most prominent architects[62]
68 Lakewood Cemetery Memorial Chapel
Lakewood Cemetery Memorial Chapel
01983-10-20October 20, 1983 3600 Hennepin Ave.
44°56′11″N 93°17′56″W / 44.936294°N 93.298842°W / 44.936294; -93.298842 (Lakewood Cemetery Memorial Chapel)
Minneapolis Domed chapel modeled on the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul; interior tiled with mosaics built by Italian artists[63]
69 Harry F. Legg House
Harry F. Legg House
01976-06-03June 3, 1976 1601 Park Ave., S.
44°58′01″N 93°15′52″W / 44.966986°N 93.264511°W / 44.966986; -93.264511 (Harry F. Legg House)
Minneapolis Queen Anne style house in Elliott Park[64]
70 Linden Hills Branch Library
Linden Hills Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 2900 W. 43rd St.
44°55′30″N 93°18′58″W / 44.924906°N 93.316142°W / 44.924906; -93.316142 (Linden Hills Branch Library)
Minneapolis Tudor Revival library with spacious reading rooms[65]
71 Little Sisters of the Poor Home for the Aged
Little Sisters of the Poor Home for the Aged
01978-09-21September 21, 1978 215 Broadway Ave., NE.
44°59′56″N 93°15′55″W / 44.998944°N 93.265164°W / 44.998944; -93.265164 (Little Sisters of the Poor Home for the Aged)
Minneapolis Romanesque Revival building designed by Frederick Corser with later additions by Kees and Colburn, built by a religious order as a home for the elderly[66]
72 Lock and Dam No. 2
Lock and Dam No. 2
02003-06-13June 13, 2003 Mississippi River north of Lake St/Marshall Ave.
44°57′21″N 93°12′31″W / 44.955833°N 93.208611°W / 44.955833; -93.208611 (Lock and Dam No. 2)
Minneapolis First lock and dam built on the Mississippi River, in 1907; later demolished when the Ford Dam was built[67]
73 John Lohmar House
John Lohmar House
01977-04-18April 18, 1977 1514 Dupont Ave., N.
44°59′41″N 93°17′30″W / 44.994647°N 93.291786°W / 44.994647; -93.291786 (John Lohmar House)
Minneapolis Queen Anne residence of a local businessman and milliner[68]
74 Lumber Exchange Building
Lumber Exchange Building
01983-05-19May 19, 1983 425 Hennepin Ave., 10 S. 5th St.
44°58′48″N 93°16′18″W / 44.979933°N 93.271672°W / 44.979933; -93.271672 (Lumber Exchange Building)
Minneapolis 1886 Richardsonian Romanesque tower by Long and Kees; the tallest building in Minneapolis when it was built[69]
75 Charles J. Martin House
Charles J. Martin House
01978-04-26April 26, 1978 1300 Mount Curve Ave.
44°58′04″N 93°17′46″W / 44.967811°N 93.296089°W / 44.967811; -93.296089 (Charles J. Martin House)
Minneapolis Renaissance palace-like house built for the secretary and treasurer of the Washburn Crosby Company in 1904[70]
76 Masonic Temple
Masonic Temple
01975-09-05September 5, 1975 528 Hennepin Ave.
44°58′46″N 93°16′24″W / 44.979389°N 93.273317°W / 44.979389; -93.273317 (Masonic Temple)
Minneapolis Long and Kees-designed Masonic hall, ornamented with intricate carvings, faux-Egyptian columns, projecting bays, and balconies[71]
77 Maternity Hospital
Maternity Hospital
01980-03-27March 27, 1980 300 Queen Ave., N.
44°58′49″N 93°19′17″W / 44.980344°N 93.321264°W / 44.980344; -93.321264 (Maternity Hospital)
Minneapolis Women's hospital founded by social reformer and women's rights advocate Martha Ripley[72]
78 Milwaukee Avenue Historic District
Milwaukee Avenue Historic District
01974-05-02May 2, 1974 Milwaukee Ave. from Franklin Ave. to 24th St.
44°57′38″N 93°14′22″W / 44.960556°N 93.239444°W / 44.960556; -93.239444 (Milwaukee Avenue Historic District)
Minneapolis Planned community of small homes on quarter-sized lots, intended for the working class; preserved because of their architectural consistency[73]
79 Minneapolis Armory
Minneapolis Armory
01985-09-26September 26, 1985 500-530 6th St., S.
44°58′30″N 93°15′48″W / 44.975092°N 93.263278°W / 44.975092; -93.263278 (Minneapolis Armory)
Minneapolis Nationally-significant example of the Streamline Moderne phase of Art Deco, built by the Public Works Administration[74]
80 Minneapolis Brewing Company
Minneapolis Brewing Company
01990-06-21June 21, 1990 Junction of Marshall St. and 13th Ave., NE.
45°00′00″N 93°16′13″W / 44.999922°N 93.270244°W / 44.999922; -93.270244 (Minneapolis Brewing Company)
Minneapolis Large landmark brewery building in northeast Minneapolis; vacant 1975-1999 and now remodeled for use as offices[75]
81 Minneapolis City Hall-Hennepin County Courthouse
Minneapolis City Hall-Hennepin County Courthouse
01974-12-04December 4, 1974 400 S. 4th Ave.
44°58′38″N 93°15′54″W / 44.977339°N 93.265064°W / 44.977339; -93.265064 (Minneapolis City Hall-Hennepin County Courthouse)
Minneapolis Richardsonian Romanesque city hall and courthouse patterned after the Allegheny County Courthouse[76]
82 Minneapolis Fire Department Repair Shop
Minneapolis Fire Department Repair Shop
02005-05-19May 19, 2005 24 University Ave., NE. and 222 1st Ave., NE.
44°59′19″N 93°15′26″W / 44.9887°N 93.257253°W / 44.9887; -93.257253 (Minneapolis Fire Department Repair Shop)
Minneapolis Repair and maintenance shop where the city of Minneapolis converted horse-drawn equipment to motorized vehicles, representing city government's efforts to reorganize and consolidate services[77]
83 Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery
Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery
02002-06-06June 6, 2002 2925 Cedar Ave., S.
44°56′59″N 93°14′40″W / 44.94972°N 93.24444°W / 44.94972; -93.24444 (Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery)
Minneapolis Oldest extant cemetery in Minneapolis; final resting place of many city pioneers
84 Minneapolis Public Library, North Branch
Minneapolis Public Library, North Branch
01977-12-07December 7, 1977 1834 Emerson Ave., N.
44°59′54″N 93°17′36″W / 44.998425°N 93.293328°W / 44.998425; -93.293328 (Minneapolis Public Library, North Branch)
Minneapolis First branch library designed specifically as an open-shelf public library, in 1893[78]
85 Minneapolis Warehouse Historic District
Minneapolis Warehouse Historic District
01989-11-03November 3, 1989 Roughly bounded by River St., 1st Ave., N., 6th St., N., 2nd Ave., N., 5th St., N., 5th Ave., N., 3rd St. N., and 10th Ave., N.
44°59′08″N 93°16′26″W / 44.985556°N 93.273889°W / 44.985556; -93.273889 (Minneapolis Warehouse Historic District)
Minneapolis Major concentration of warehouse buildings representing Minneapolis' prominence as a distribution center, with buildings designed by prominent local architects in a wide range of architectural styles[79]
86 Minneapolis YMCA Central Building
Minneapolis YMCA Central Building
01995-11-29November 29, 1995 36 S. 9th St. (formerly 30 S. 9th St.)
44°58′34″N 93°16′30″W / 44.976056°N 93.27495°W / 44.976056; -93.27495 (Minneapolis YMCA Central Building)
Minneapolis Long, Lamoreaux, and Long-designed YMCA building in the Gothic Revival style[80]
87 Minnehaha Grange Hall
Minnehaha Grange Hall
01970-10-09October 9, 1970 Eden Ave. at Minnesota Highway 100
44°54′43″N 93°21′00″W / 44.912025°N 93.349894°W / 44.912025; -93.349894 (Minnehaha Grange Hall)
Edina 1879 Grange hall, also served as the village hall from 1888 through 1942[17]
88 Minnehaha Historic District
Minnehaha Historic District
01969-11-25November 25, 1969 Roughly Hiawatha and Minnehaha Aves. and Godfrey Rd.
44°54′56″N 93°12′39″W / 44.915556°N 93.210833°W / 44.915556; -93.210833 (Minnehaha Historic District)
Minneapolis Early city park containing historic houses and sites, Minnehaha Falls, and an 1870s railroad station[81]
89 Minnesota Soldiers' Home Historic District
Minnesota Soldiers' Home Historic District
01989-03-02March 2, 1989 Roughly bounded by Minnehaha Ave., the Mississippi River, and Godfrey Parkway
44°54′45″N 93°12′15″W / 44.9125°N 93.204167°W / 44.9125; -93.204167 (Minnesota Soldiers' Home Historic District)
Minneapolis Home for veterans with master plan designed by landscape architect Horace Cleveland in 1887; buildings by Warren B. Dunnell[81]
90 Moline, Milburn and Stoddard Company
Moline, Milburn and Stoddard Company
01975-02-20February 20, 1975 250 3rd Ave., N.
44°59′00″N 93°16′28″W / 44.983439°N 93.274353°W / 44.983439; -93.274353 (Moline, Milburn and Stoddard Company)
Minneapolis Limestone factory/showroom building built for a farm equipment company[81]
91 Elisha and Lizzie Morse Jr. House
Elisha and Lizzie Morse Jr. House
01995-07-28July 28, 1995 2325-2327 Pillsbury Ave., S.
44°57′40″N 93°16′51″W / 44.961006°N 93.280964°W / 44.961006; -93.280964 (Elisha and Lizzie Morse Jr. House)
Minneapolis Italian Villa-styled house with a distinctive cupola[82]
92 Frieda and Henry J. Neils House
Frieda and Henry J. Neils House
02004-05-26May 26, 2004 2801 Burnham Boulevard
44°57′30″N 93°19′02″W / 44.9583°N 93.317339°W / 44.9583; -93.317339 (Frieda and Henry J. Neils House)
Minneapolis 1949 Frank Lloyd Wright house near Cedar Lake designed in the Usonian style[83]
93 New Main-Augsburg Seminary
New Main-Augsburg Seminary
01983-10-06October 6, 1983 731 21st Ave., S.
44°57′57″N 93°14′30″W / 44.965778°N 93.241681°W / 44.965778; -93.241681 (New Main-Augsburg Seminary)
Minneapolis 1901 building originally part of Augsburg Seminary; ornamented with granite columns and terra cotta; known as "Old Main" to Augsburg College communities members[84]
94 George R. Newell House
George R. Newell House
01977-09-15September 15, 1977 1818 LaSalle Ave.
44°57′54″N 93°16′47″W / 44.964969°N 93.279844°W / 44.964969; -93.279844 (George R. Newell House)
Minneapolis Imposing Romanesque Revival house with a rusticated sandstone exterior, extensive interior woodwork, and Tiffany lamps[85]
95 Nokomis Knoll Residential Historic District
Nokomis Knoll Residential Historic District
01999-08-05August 5, 1999 Bounded by W. 52nd St., West Lake Nokomis Parkway, E. 54th St., and Bloomington Ave.
44°54′26″N 93°15′02″W / 44.907222°N 93.250556°W / 44.907222; -93.250556 (Nokomis Knoll Residential Historic District)
Minneapolis Middle-class residential development with Tudor Revival and other period revival styles popular in the 1920s and 1930s[86][87]
96 North East Neighborhood House
North East Neighborhood House
02001-07-19July 19, 2001 1929 2nd St., NE.
45°00′29″N 93°15′57″W / 45.008125°N 93.265714°W / 45.008125; -93.265714 (North East Neighborhood House)
Minneapolis Georgian Revival settlement house built in 1919 to serve immigrants and the unemployed[88]
97 Northwestern Knitting Company Factory building
Northwestern Knitting Company Factory building
01983-06-03June 3, 1983 718 Glenwood Ave.
44°58′50″N 93°17′18″W / 44.980433°N 93.288417°W / 44.980433; -93.288417 (Northwestern Knitting Company Factory building)
Minneapolis Manufacturer of "itchless" woolen underwear, plated with silk and cotton; became the leading national manufacturer of underwear in 1912[89]
98 Ogden Apartment Hotel
Ogden Apartment Hotel
01992-01-13January 13, 1992 66-68 S. 12th St.
44°58′22″N 93°16′38″W / 44.972808°N 93.277219°W / 44.972808; -93.277219 (Ogden Apartment Hotel)
Minneapolis Unusual housing type for middle-class residents during the early 20th century: apartments with a common restaurant instead of kitchens[90]
99 Floyd B. Olson House
Floyd B. Olson House
01974-12-31December 31, 1974 1914 W. 49th St.
44°54′52″N 93°18′14″W / 44.914497°N 93.303922°W / 44.914497; -93.303922 (Floyd B. Olson House)
Minneapolis Home of Minnesota governor Floyd B. Olson, a leader in the Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party and a crusader for social justice[91]
100 Dr. Oscar Owre House
Dr. Oscar Owre House
01984-03-08March 8, 1984 2625 Newton Ave., S.
44°57′28″N 93°18′20″W / 44.957883°N 93.305544°W / 44.957883; -93.305544 (Dr. Oscar Owre House)
Minneapolis Purcell & Elmslie-designed Prairie School house overlooking Lake of the Isles[92]
101 Charles and Grace Parker House
Charles and Grace Parker House
01992-06-11June 11, 1992 4829 Colfax Ave., S.
44°54′55″N 93°17′27″W / 44.91525°N 93.290878°W / 44.91525; -93.290878 (Charles and Grace Parker House)
Minneapolis Purcell & Elmslie-designed Prairie School house for a local businessman[93]
102 Peavey–Haglin Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator
Peavey–Haglin Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator
01978-12-19December 19, 1978 Junction of Minnesota Highways 7 and 100
44°56′35″N 93°20′39″W / 44.943008°N 93.344253°W / 44.943008; -93.344253 (Peavey–Haglin Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator)
St. Louis Park First circular-shaped reinforced concrete grain elevator in the United States and possibly in the world[94]; listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1981[30]
103 Pence Automobile Company Building
Pence Automobile Company Building
02007-12-27December 27, 2007 800 Hennepin Ave.
44°58′38″N 93°16′35″W / 44.977222°N 93.276389°W / 44.977222; -93.276389 (Pence Automobile Company Building)
Minneapolis Office building, with terra cotta ornamentation inspired by Louis Sullivan's work, of an early 20th century automobile dealer and banker[95]
104 Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity House
Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity House
02005-09-15September 15, 2005 1129 University Ave., SE.
44°58′52″N 93°14′21″W / 44.981086°N 93.239208°W / 44.981086; -93.239208 (Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity House)
Minneapolis Fraternity house designed by Viennese architect Carl B. Stravs, inspired by the Vienna Secession; unusual design at a time when most houses were built in period revival styles[96]
105 Pillsbury A Mill
Pillsbury A Mill
01966-11-13November 13, 1966 301 Main St., SE.
44°59′02″N 93°15′10″W / 44.983939°N 93.252664°W / 44.983939; -93.252664 (Pillsbury A Mill)
Minneapolis Built in 1881 and was the largest flour mill in the world for 40 years[97];listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1966[30]
106 Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company Building
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company Building
01977-09-13September 13, 1977 616 S. 3rd St.
44°58′38″N 93°15′34″W / 44.977172°N 93.259356°W / 44.977172; -93.259356 (Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company Building)
Minneapolis Brick warehouse building showing influences of Henry Hobson Richardson, Louis Sullivan, and John Wellborn Root[98]
107 Gideon H. Pond House
Gideon H. Pond House
01970-07-16July 16, 1970 401 E. 104th St.
44°48′56″N 93°16′14″W / 44.815417°N 93.270556°W / 44.815417; -93.270556 (Gideon H. Pond House)
Bloomington House of an early missionary to the Dakota tribe in Minnesota who wrote a Dakota language dictionary[99]
108 Prospect Park Water Tower and Tower Hill Park
Prospect Park Water Tower and Tower Hill Park
01997-11-13November 13, 1997 55 Malcolm Ave., SE.
44°58′48″N 93°15′51″W / 44.98°N 93.264167°W / 44.98; -93.264167 (Prospect Park Water Tower and Tower Hill Park)
Minneapolis Distinctive water tower with "witch's hat" design built by Frederick W. Cappelen in 1913 at the highest elevation in Minneapolis[100]
109 William Gray Purcell House
William Gray Purcell House
01974-10-29October 29, 1974 2328 Lake Pl.
44°57′34″N 93°18′02″W / 44.959336°N 93.300481°W / 44.959336; -93.300481 (William Gray Purcell House)
Minneapolis Purcell & Elmslie-designed Prairie School house, regarded as one of the firm's best works[101]
110 Queen Avenue Bridge
Queen Avenue Bridge
01989-11-06November 6, 1989 W. Lake Harriet Boulevard over a Minnesota Transportation Museum street railway track
44°55′28″N 93°18′40″W / 44.924469°N 93.311069°W / 44.924469; -93.311069 (Queen Avenue Bridge)
Minneapolis Third-oldest reinforced concrete arch bridge in Minnesota[102]
111 Rand Tower
Rand Tower
01994-04-14April 14, 1994 527-529 Marquette Ave.
44°58′55″N 93°16′33″W / 44.982083°N 93.275742°W / 44.982083; -93.275742 (Rand Tower)
Minneapolis Holabird & Root-designed Moderne-style skyscraper built in 1928-1929[103]
112 Roosevelt Community Library
Roosevelt Community Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 4026 28th Ave., S.
44°55′37″N 93°13′45″W / 44.926914°N 93.2291°W / 44.926914; -93.2291 (Roosevelt Community Library)
Minneapolis A small Minneapolis Public Library, built in the Tudor Revival style, modeled after the original East Lake Community Library building.[104]
113 Sears, Roebuck and Company Mail-Order Warehouse and Retail Store
Sears, Roebuck and Company Mail-Order Warehouse and Retail Store
02005-07-29July 29, 2005 2929 Chicago Ave., S.
44°56′57″N 93°15′39″W / 44.949297°N 93.260906°W / 44.949297; -93.260906 (Sears, Roebuck and Company Mail-Order Warehouse and Retail Store)
Minneapolis Large warehouse building that supported the enormous growth of Sears, Roebuck and Company in the early 20th century, symbolizing the increase of consumer capitalism in America[105]
114 Anne C. and Frank B. Semple House
Anne C. and Frank B. Semple House
01998-02-26February 26, 1998 100-104 W. Franklin Ave.
44°57′47″N 93°16′46″W / 44.963081°N 93.279453°W / 44.963081; -93.279453 (Anne C. and Frank B. Semple House)
Minneapolis Beaux-Arts mansion built for a prosperous hardware merchant and his wife[106][107]
115 Sam S. Shubert Theatre
Sam S. Shubert Theatre
01995-10-31October 31, 1995 516 Hennepin Ave., S.
44°58′47″N 93°16′23″W / 44.979661°N 93.273067°W / 44.979661; -93.273067 (Sam S. Shubert Theatre)
Minneapolis Classical Revival theatre with terra cotta facade designed by William Albert Swasey and built in 1910 for The Shubert Organization[107]
116 H. Alden Smith House
H. Alden Smith House
01976-03-16March 16, 1976 1403 Harmon Pl.
44°58′22″N 93°16′51″W / 44.972711°N 93.280769°W / 44.972711; -93.280769 (H. Alden Smith House)
Minneapolis Brownstone mansion in the Richardsonian Romanesque style for sash and door salesman[108]
117 Lena O. Smith House
Lena O. Smith House
01991-09-26September 26, 1991 3905 5th Ave., S.
44°55′55″N 93°16′05″W / 44.931872°N 93.268022°W / 44.931872; -93.268022 (Lena O. Smith House)
Minneapolis Home of a prominent African American civil rights lawyer, founder of the Minneapolis Urban League, and first woman president of the local NAACP chapter[107]
118 St. Anthony Falls Historic District
St. Anthony Falls Historic District
01971-03-11March 11, 1971 Around the Mississippi River between Plymouth and S. 10th Aves.
44°58′55″N 93°16′10″W / 44.981944°N 93.269444°W / 44.981944; -93.269444 (St. Anthony Falls Historic District)
Minneapolis Only major waterfall on the Mississippi River, discovered by Europeans in 1680; use of its water power fueled sawmills, flour mills, and hydroelectric power generation, and led to the establishment of the town of St. Anthony in 1849 and of Minneapolis in 1857[109]
119 Station 13 Minneapolis Fire Department
Station 13 Minneapolis Fire Department
02003-12-23December 23, 2003 4201 Cedar Ave., S.
44°55′38″N 93°14′47″W / 44.927147°N 93.246461°W / 44.927147; -93.246461 (Station 13 Minneapolis Fire Department)
Minneapolis Fire station designed in a Craftsman/Bungalow style to blend into its residential neighborhood, rapidly expanding at the time[110]
120 Station 28 Minneapolis Fire Department
Station 28 Minneapolis Fire Department
01993-11-12November 12, 1993 2724 W. 43rd St.
44°55′29″N 93°18′48″W / 44.924825°N 93.313225°W / 44.924825; -93.313225 (Station 28 Minneapolis Fire Department)
Minneapolis Fire station built in the Linden Hills neighborhood of Minneapolis when it was transforming from a summer lakeside community into a neighborhood of permanent residents[111]
121 Stevens Square Historic District
Stevens Square Historic District
01993-07-01July 1, 1993 Roughly bounded by E. 17th St., 3rd Ave., S., Franklin Ave., and 1st Ave., S.
44°57′52″N 93°16′28″W / 44.964444°N 93.274444°W / 44.964444; -93.274444 (Stevens Square Historic District)
Minneapolis District of apartment buildings and single-family homes with consistent architectural themes surrounding a public park, reflecting the rapid growth in housing development before and after World War I[112]
122 Stewart Memorial Presbyterian Church
Stewart Memorial Presbyterian Church
01978-11-28November 28, 1978 116 E. 32nd St.
44°56′43″N 93°16′32″W / 44.945175°N 93.275564°W / 44.945175; -93.275564 (Stewart Memorial Presbyterian Church)
Minneapolis Prairie School church designed by William Gray Purcell, one of only a few Prairie School churches, influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple[113]
123 Sumner Branch Library
Sumner Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 611 Emerson Ave., N.
44°59′06″N 93°17′40″W / 44.984917°N 93.294528°W / 44.984917; -93.294528 (Sumner Branch Library)
Minneapolis Minneapolis Public Library branch, it was a Carnegie library and a haven for Jewish immigrants of the early 1900s.[104]
124 Swinford Townhouses and Apartments
Swinford Townhouses and Apartments
01990-10-25October 25, 1990 1213–1221 and 1225 Hawthorne Ave.
44°58′31″N 93°16′54″W / 44.975228°N 93.281794°W / 44.975228; -93.281794 (Swinford Townhouses and Apartments)
Minneapolis Rowhouses and apartment building with many architectural details, designed as upper-class apartments in the 1880s and 1890s[114]
125 Thirty-sixth Street Branch Library
Thirty-sixth Street Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 347 E. 36th St.
44°56′14″N 93°16′13″W / 44.937358°N 93.270331°W / 44.937358; -93.270331 (Thirty-sixth Street Branch Library)
Minneapolis Minneapolis Public Library branch now known as 'Hosmer Community Library'.[104]
126 Thompson Summer House
Thompson Summer House
01998-01-15January 15, 1998 3012 Shoreline Dr.
44°56′20″N 93°35′59″W / 44.938983°N 93.599736°W / 44.938983; -93.599736 (Thompson Summer House)
Minnetonka Beach Wood-frame summer residence built in 1887 in an affluent lakeshore resort community for a prominent attorney/civic leader[115]
127 Swan Turnblad House
Swan Turnblad House
01971-08-26August 26, 1971 2600 Park Ave.
44°58′49″N 93°16′29″W / 44.980286°N 93.274717°W / 44.980286; -93.274717 (Swan Turnblad House)
Minneapolis Mansion with several Exotic Revival influences built by a Swedish-American newspaper publisher; built between 1903 and 1910 at a cost of $1.5 million[116]
128 Twin City Rapid Transit Company Steam Power Plant
Twin City Rapid Transit Company Steam Power Plant
01994-11-25November 25, 1994 12-20 6th Ave., SE.
44°58′51″N 93°14′57″W / 44.980794°N 93.2491°W / 44.980794; -93.2491 (Twin City Rapid Transit Company Steam Power Plant)
Minneapolis Renaissance Revival power plant built in 1903 to power the Twin City Rapid Transit streetcar system[117]
129 United States Post Office
United States Post Office
02010-04-01April 1, 2010 212 3rd Ave. S.
44°58′51″N 93°15′49″W / 44.980703°N 93.263525°W / 44.980703; -93.263525 (United States Post Office)
Minneapolis Now the United States Federal Office Building (also known as the "Old" Federal Building)[118]
130 University of Minnesota Old Campus Historic District
University of Minnesota Old Campus Historic District
01984-08-23August 23, 1984 University Ave. and 15th Ave.
44°58′42″N 93°14′12″W / 44.978333°N 93.236667°W / 44.978333; -93.236667 (University of Minnesota Old Campus Historic District)
Minneapolis Thirteen buildings designed by noted architects in a variety of styles between 1886 and 1907, representing a major period of expansion of the University of Minnesota[117]
131 Horatio P. Van Cleve House
Horatio P. Van Cleve House
01976-03-16March 16, 1976 603 5th St., SE,
44°59′10″N 93°14′44″W / 44.986114°N 93.245572°W / 44.986114; -93.245572 (Horatio P. Van Cleve House)
Minneapolis 1858 residence of Horatio P. Van Cleve, an American Civil War general and the commander of the 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry[117]
132 George W. and Nancy B. Van Dusen House
George W. and Nancy B. Van Dusen House
01995-05-18May 18, 1995 1900 LaSalle Ave.
44°57′50″N 93°16′46″W / 44.963981°N 93.279583°W / 44.963981; -93.279583 (George W. and Nancy B. Van Dusen House)
Minneapolis Massive 12,000-square-foot (1,100 m2) mansion built by a prosperous owner of a chain of grain elevators[119]
133 Walker Branch Library
Walker Branch Library
02000-05-26May 26, 2000 2901 Hennepin Ave., S.
44°57′00″N 93°17′52″W / 44.949892°N 93.297769°W / 44.949892; -93.297769 (Walker Branch Library)
Minneapolis Beaux-Arts library building funded by T. B. Walker to improve library service in a then-sparsely populated section of Minneapolis[120]
134 Washburn "A" Mill
Washburn "A" Mill
01983-05-04May 4, 1983 1st St., S. at Portland Ave.
44°58′44″N 93°15′25″W / 44.978889°N 93.256944°W / 44.978889; -93.256944 (Washburn "A" Mill)
Minneapolis Largest mill of the Washburn Crosby Company, a forerunner of General Mills; represents the growth and transformation of flour milling into a mass-production industry[44]; listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1983[30]
135 Washburn Park Water Tower
Washburn Park Water Tower
01983-10-06October 6, 1983 401 Prospect Ave.
44°54′39″N 93°17′02″W / 44.910767°N 93.284014°W / 44.910767; -93.284014 (Washburn Park Water Tower)
Minneapolis Harry Wild Jones-designed water tower, ornamented with sculptured eagles and "guardians of health"[121]
136 Washburn-Fair Oaks Mansion District
Washburn-Fair Oaks Mansion District
01978-02-17February 17, 1978 1st and 2nd Aves., 22nd St., and Stevens Ave.
44°57′40″N 93°16′31″W / 44.961111°N 93.275278°W / 44.961111; -93.275278 (Washburn-Fair Oaks Mansion District)
Minneapolis Grouping of mansions clustered around Washburn-Fair Oaks Park built by prominent Minneapolis families and displaying a variety of popular architectural styles[122]
137 Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church
Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church
01984-02-09February 9, 1984 101 E. Grant St.
44°58′11″N 93°16′33″W / 44.969661°N 93.275872°W / 44.969661; -93.275872 (Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church)
Minneapolis Elaborate Richardsonian Romanesque church building designed in 1880 by Warren H. Hayes[123]
138 Westminster Presbyterian Church
Westminster Presbyterian Church
01998-06-26June 26, 1998 83 12th St., S.
44°58′18″N 93°16′32″W / 44.971642°N 93.275564°W / 44.971642; -93.275564 (Westminster Presbyterian Church)
Minneapolis Stone church with twin towers designed by Charles S. Sedgwick and Warren H. Hayes in 1896-1897[124]
139 White Castle Building No. 8
White Castle Building No. 8
01986-10-16October 16, 1986 3252 Lyndale Ave., S.
44°56′36″N 93°17′18″W / 44.943344°N 93.288231°W / 44.943344; -93.288231 (White Castle Building No. 8)
Minneapolis Portable prefabricated steel building that housed the first fast food restaurant in Minneapolis, built in 1936[125]
140 Malcolm Willey House
Malcolm Willey House
01984-02-23February 23, 1984 255 Bedford St., SE.
44°57′40″N 93°12′29″W / 44.961164°N 93.208189°W / 44.961164; -93.208189 (Malcolm Willey House)
Minneapolis 1934 Frank Lloyd Wright house in a transition from Prairie School to Usonian design[126]
141 Theodore Wirth House-Administration Building
Theodore Wirth House-Administration Building
02002-06-07June 7, 2002 3954 Bryant Ave., S.
44°55′52″N 93°17′30″W / 44.931111°N 93.291667°W / 44.931111; -93.291667 (Theodore Wirth House-Administration Building)
Minneapolis House built for Theodore Wirth, influential superintendent of the Minneapolis Parks system who presided over the modernization and expansion of the system from 1,810 acres (7.3 km2) in 1906 to 5,241 in 1935[127]
142 Allemarinda and James Wyer House
Allemarinda and James Wyer House
01977-04-18April 18, 1977 201 Mill St.
44°54′06″N 93°33′45″W / 44.901725°N 93.562364°W / 44.901725; -93.562364 (Allemarinda and James Wyer House)
Excelsior Victorian lakeside cottage near Lake Minnetonka built in 1887, which served as the home for managers of the Excelsior Amusement Park from 1925 through 1974[128]

See also

Notes

  • aNumbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmark sites and National Register of Historic Places Districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  • bNames listed on the National Register may differ from the current or most common names of the structures. For example, the Washburn "A" Mill is now known as the Mill City Museum.[129]

References

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  2. ^ Anfinson, John O. (Spring 2003). "Spiritual Power to Industrial Might: 12,000 Years at St. Anthony Falls". Minnesota History 58 (5): 252–269. ISSN 0026-5497. 
  3. ^ Danbom, David B. (Spring 2003). "Flour Power: The Significance of Flour Milling at the Falls". Minnesota History 58 (5): 271–285. ISSN 0026-5497. 
  4. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on November 10, 2011.
  5. ^ Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmark sites and National Register of Historic Places Districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
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  52. ^ a b c d Nord 2003, p. 91.
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  79. ^ "North Loop Warehouse District". Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. April 2007. http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/hpc/landmarks/North_Loop_Warhouse.asp. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
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  93. ^ Millett 2007, p. 233.
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  118. ^ Schedule an Appointment at the Minneapolis Passport Agency, U.S. Department of State, Accessed November 16, 2010.
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  120. ^ "Old Walker Branch Library". Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/hpc/landmarks/Hennepin_Ave_2901_Old_Walker_Library.asp. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
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  122. ^ "Washburn Fair-Oaks Historic District". Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/hpc/landmarks/Washburn_Fair_Oaks.asp. Retrieved 2008-09-24. 
  123. ^ "Wesley United Methodist Church". Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/hpc/landmarks/Grant_St_E_101_Wesley_Methodist_Church.asp. Retrieved 2008-09-25. 
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  128. ^ "What's New". Excelsior Heritage, Inc.. 2006. http://excelsiorheritage.org/id4.html. Retrieved 2008-09-26. 
  129. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-24. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html. 

Bibliography

  • Nord, Mary Ann (2003). The National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society. ISBN 0-87351-448-3. 
  • Millett, Larry (2007). AIA Guide to the Twin Cities: The Essential Source on the Architecture of Minneapolis and St. Paul. 

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