Modern converts to Christianity from Judaism


Modern converts to Christianity from Judaism


This article is about Modern converts to Christianity from Judaism:

The number of post-Mendelssohnian Jews who abandoned their ancestral faith is very large. According to Heman in Herzog-Hauck, "Real-Encyc." (x. 114), the number of converts during the 19th century exceeded 100,000;
Salmon, in his "Handbuch der Mission" (1893, p. 48), claims 130,000;
others ("Divre Emeth," 1880, p. 47; 1883, p. 187) claim as many as 250,000.
For Russia alone 40,000 are claimed as having been converted from 1836 to 1875 ("Missionsblatt des Rheinisch-Westphälischen Vereins für Israel," 1878, p. 122);
while for England, up to 1875, the estimate is 50,000 (De Le Roi, "Die Evangelische Christenheit und die Juden," iii. 60).

Modern conversions mainly occurred en masse and at critical periods. In England there was a large secession when the chief Sephardic families, the Bernals, Furtados, Ricardos, Disraelis, Ximenes, Lopez's, Uzziellis, and others, joined the Church (see Picciotto, "Sketches of Anglo-Jewish History").
Germany had three of these periods. The Mendelssohnian era was marked by numerous conversions. In 1811, David Friedlander handed Prussian State Chancellor Hardenberg a list of 32 Jewish families and 18 unmarried Jews who had recently abandoned their ancestral faith (Rabbi Abraham Geiger, "Vor Hundert Jahren," Brunswick, 1899). In the reign of Frederick William III., about 2,200 Jews were baptized (1822  – 1840), most of these being residents of the larger cities. The 3rd and longest period of secession was the anti-Semitic, beginning with the year 1880. During this time the other German states, besides Austria and France, had an equal share in the number of those who obtained high stations and large revenues as the price for renouncing Judaism.
The following is a list of the more prominent modern converts, the rarity of French names in which is probably because conversion was not necessary to a public career in that country.

Contents

A

  • Abraham Abrahamson, aka Abramson (1754, Potsdam  – 1811), German stamp-cutter
  • David Assing (de) (1787, Königsberg  – 1842, Hamburg), German physician and poet, member of the Assing family
20th century

B

  • Friedrich Daniel Bach (1756, Potsdam  – 1830), German painter
  • Jakob (Salomon) Bartholdy, born: Jakob Salomon (1779, Berlin  – 1825), Prussian diplomatist
  • Franz Friedrich Benary, aka Franz (Simon) Ferdinand Benary (1805, Kassel  – 1860), German philologist[1]
  • Karl Albert Benary, aka Karl Albert Agathon Benary, Agathon Benary (de) (1807, Kassel  – 1860), German classical scholar
  • Eduard (Julius Friedrich) Bendemann (1811, Berlin  – 1845), German painter
  • Sir Julius Benedict (1804, Stuttgart  – 1885), German-English composer
  • Theodor Benfey (1809, Nörten-Hardenberg  – 1881), German philologist
  • Michael Bernays (1834, Hamburg  – 1897), professor of literature at Munich
  • Max Adolf Bernhard, exactly: (Friedrich Heinrich) Adolf Bernhard Max, Friedrich Heinrich Adolph Bernhard Max (1799  – 1866), German professor of music[2]
  • Gottfried Bernhardy (1800, Gorzów Wielkopolski  – 1875), German philologist of Halle
  • Moritz Bloch (de), aka Moritz Ballagi, Hungarian: Bloch Móric, Ballagi Mór (1815, Inócz  – 1891), Hungarian professor of ecclesiastical history[3]
  • Ludwig Börne, born: Löb Baruch (1786, Frankfurter Judengasse  – 1837), German political writer
  • John Braham (1774, London  – 1856), English composer and singer
  • Moritz Wilhelm August Breidenbach (1796, Offenbach am Main  – 1856), German lawyer, son of Wolf Breidenbach (de)
  • Max Büdinger (de) (1828, Kassel  – 1902, Vienna), German-Austrian historian, professor of history at Vienna
20th century

C

20th century

D

  • Christian Georg Nathan David (1793  – 1874), professor of jurisprudence at Copenhagen
  • Ferdinand David (1810  – 1873), German virtuoso and composer
  • Ludwig Dessoir (1810  – 1874), actor at Berlin
  • John Detmond, aka John Detmold (1807  – 1856), German statesman
  • Benjamin Disraeli, Lord Beaconsfield (1804  – 1881), British statesman and writer
  • Leopold Ritter von Dittel (1815  – 1898) Austrian surgeon
  • David Paul Drach (1791  – 1865), librarian of the Propaganda in Rome
20th century

E

  • Georg Eberti (1812  – 1884), professor of jurisprudence, Breslau
  • Edersheim (1825  – 1889), English theologian and writer
  • F. C. Ewald (?  – 1874), German divine
20th century

F

  • Oscar Feinberg (1844), artist of Mitau, Courland
  • Rachel Felix (1820  – 1858), French actress
  • Achille Fould (1800  – 1867), French minister of finance
  • Wilhelm Fraknoi (1843), Hungarian bishop; president of Hungarian Academy of Science
  • Emil Albert von Friedberg (1837), German professor
  • Heinrich von Friedberg (1813  – 1895), Prussian minister of justice
  • Rudolf Friedenthal (1827  – 1890), German deputy
  • Ludwig Friedlander (1824), German professor of archeology
  • Ludwig Herman Friedlander (1790  – 1851), German professor
  • Max Friedlander (1829  – 1872), German-Austrian journalist
20th century

G

  • Eduard Gans (1798  – 1839), professor of jurisprudence, Berlin
  • Hermann Goldschmidt (1802  – 1866), German astronomer
  • Karl Eduard Güterbock (1830), German professor

H

  • Elkan Markus Hahn (1781  – 1860), professor of philology
  • Heinrich Heine (1799  – 1856), German poet
  • Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle (1809  – 1885), German anatomist, Göttingen
  • August Wilhelm (Eduard Theodor) Henschel (1790, Breslau  – 1856, Breslau), professor of botany (1824  – 1837) at Breslau[5]
  • Henriette Herz (1764  – 1803), German authoress
  • Ferdinand (von) Hiller (1811, Frankfurt am Main  – 1886), German musical composer
  • Siegfried Hirsch (1816  – 1860), professor of history, Halle
  • Theodor Hirsch (1806  – 1881), professor of history, Greifswald
  • Adolf Hitler (1889 – 1945), Austrian Psychopath, Dictator of Germany 1933-45
20th century

J

  • Carl (Karl) Gustav (Jacob) Jacobi (1804  – 1857), professor of mathematics, Berlin
  • Heinrich Jacobsohn (de) (1826, Königsberg  – 1890), professor of medicine, Berlin[6]
  • Ludwig Jacobsohn (1766  – 1842), professor of medicine, Königsberg
  • Heinrich Otto Jacoby (1815  – 1864), professor of Greek, Königsberg[7]
  • Philipp Jaffé (1819  – 1870), professor of history, Berlin
  • Ferdinand Joachimstadt (1816  – 1861), professor of mathematics
  • Jacob Josephsohn (1818  –  ?), Swedish musical composer
20th century

K

  • David Kalisch (1820, Breslau  – 1872), German dramatist
  • Christian Kalkar, aka Christian Andreas Hermann Kalkar (sv) (1803, Stockholm  – 1886), Swedish writer and divine, father of Otto Kalkar (da)
  • Julius Leopold Klein (1810, Miskolc  – 1876), Hungarian-German litterateur
  • Heinrich Kossmann, born: Heumann Coschmann (1813, Reidt/Rhein  – 1836, Karlsruhe), German mathematician[8]
  • Leopold Kronecker (1823, Liegnitz  – 1891), German mathematician
20th century

L

  • Hermann Lebert (1813  – 1878), professor of medicine, Breslau
  • Karl Lehrs (1802  – 1878), professor of Greek
  • Siegfried Lehrs, philologist
  • Daniel Lessmann (1794  – 1831), German writer
  • Rahel Levin, German social leader
  • Fanny Lewald (1811  – 1889), German authoress
  • Sir Menasseh Lopez (1831), English judge
20th century

M

  • Eduard Magnus (1799  – 1872), professor of arts, Berlin
  • Heinrich Gustav Magnus (1802  – 1870), professor of chemistry
  • Ludwig Immanuel Magnus, mathematician, Berlin
  • Moses Margoliouth (1818  – 1881), Jewish historian, uncle of David Samuel Margoliouth
  • Karl Marx (1818  – 1883), German socialist
  • Solomon Mayer (1797  – 1862), German professor of law
  • Moritz Her. Ed. Meier, professor of philosophy, Halle
  • Dorothea Mendelssohn (1769  – 1839), German social leader
  • Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809  – 1847), German composer
  • Lydia Monteflore (1771  – 1858), aunt of Sir Moses Montefiore; baptized 1858
20th century

N

20th century

P

  • Sir Francis Cohen Palgrave, born: Francis Ephraim Cohen (1788, London  – 1861), English historian
  • Friedrich Adolf Philippi (1809, Berlin  – 1882, Rostock), German professor of theology, Dorpat; converted to Christianity in 1829
  • Lorenzo Da Ponte, born: Emanuele Conegliano (1749, Ceneda  – 1839), Venetian writer and composer
20th century

R

  • David Ricardo (1772, London  – 1823), British political economist
  • Johann Georg Rosenhain (de) (1816, Königsberg  – 1887), German professor of mathematics
  • Joseph Karl Rubino, aka Joseph Carl Friedrich Rubino, Joseph Rubino (1799, Fritzlar  – 1864, Marburg), German professor of history, historian of law, Marburg[9]
  • Anton G. Rubinstein (1829, Ofatinţi  – 1889), Russian musician
20th century

S

20th century

W

  • Jacob Philip Wolfers (1803), professor of astronomy
  • Oscar Ludwig Wolff (1799  – 1851), German professor of literature
  • Joseph Wolff (1795  – 1862), traveler
20th century

X

  • Sir Moses Ximenes (1762), English high sheriff
20th century

See also

Jewish identity
Modern

Bibliography


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