Matthew 2:23

Matthew 2:23 is the twenty-third verse of the second chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The young Jesus and the Holy Family have just returned from Egypt and in this verse are said to settle in Nazareth. This is the final verse of Matthew's infancy narrative. It is also a much studied verse because of the enigmatic quote that ends it.

The original Koine Greek, according to Westcott and Hort, reads:

και ελθων κατωκησεν εις πολιν λεγομενην
ναζαρετ οπως πληρωθη το ρηθεν δια των
προφητων οτι ναζωραιος κληθησεται

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads:

And he came and dwelt in a city
called Nazareth: that it might be
fulfilled which was spoken by the
prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.

The World English Bible translates the passage as:

and came and lived in a city
called Nazareth; that it might be
fulfilled which was spoken through the
prophets: "He will be called a Nazarene."

For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 2:23

Nazareth was a small village unmentioned in any writings before this time, though there is some archeological evidence that a village existed in the area at the time of Jesus.[1]. Matthew gives no specific reason for why the family moved to this town, and Luke has them originally from there. The town was near the Via Maris, the main road connecting to Egypt, and the route the family would have most likely been travelling.[1] Clarke notes that Nazareth was just to the north of the larger centre of Sepphoris that had been largely destroyed in the violence after the death of Herod the Great. At this time it was being rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and Clarke speculates that this could have been a source of employment for a carpenter such as Joseph.[2]

The origin of Jesus in a small town with no Biblical history was a problem to many early Christian writers. Matthew deals with this by arguing that Jesus' origin in Nazareth is a fulfillment of prophecy. The difficulty with the brief quote "he will be called a Nazarene" is that it occurs nowhere in the Old Testament prophets, or any other extant source. A number of theories have been advanced to explain this. At the time the canon was not firmly established and it is possible that Matthew is quoting some lost source. However all the other quotations in Matthew are from well known works, and if a quotation so closely linking Jesus' hometown and the messiah existed it would likely have been preserved. [3]

There is much debate, and many theories among scholars as to what the quote could mean. Scholars have searched through the Old Testament for passages that are similar. One popular suggestion is Judges 13:5 where of Samson it says "the child shall be a Nazirite." A nazirite was a member of a sect who practiced asceticism, and the word has no known link to the name of the town. Other scholars reject this explanation. Jesus was not a nazirite and is never described as one. Matthew 11:3 shows Jesus specifically rejecting such teachings.[4] In both Hebrew and Greek the words nazarene and nazirite are quite distinct and are less likely to be conflated than in English.[citation needed] France also notes that Judges has "shall be" while Matthew has "shall be called." France feels that if Matthew had been quoting Judges he would have retained the same form.[5]

Another theory is that it is based on Isaiah 53:2. This messianic reference states that "he grew up before him like a tender shoot." The Hebrew for shoot is nasir, more similar to the word nazarene then nazirite. Keener notes that the term is used to refer to the messiah in the Dead Sea Scrolls.[6] However this piece of wordplay is meaningless in Greek. Hebrew wordplay is not unknown in Matthew, such as Matthew 1:21. Goulder feels that the author of Matthew felt it essential that Jesus' hometown be justified in prophecy and he thus looked for the closest thing he could find, which was this verse.[7]

This verse refers to prophets in the plural, unlike all of Matthew's other references to known Old Testament prophets, which use the singular. This could imply that the wordplay and multiple interpretations was intentional. Rothfuchs reads the plural as the author of Matthew referring to all the quotes so far in the Gospel that directed the Holy Family in their travels. To him the line is thus not a direct quite from the prophets, but the inevitable end the previous directions led to.

France argues that the verse is not a reference to either the nazirite or nasir verses. Rather he advances the theory that Nazarene should be understood as an insulting epithet. A unflattering reference to Jesus' humble and obscure origins that was used by anti-Christians at the time. The word is used in just such a way at Matthew 26:71. Thus to France the meaning of the verse is that Jesus fulfill the prophecies that the messiah will be abused and neglected, an current in Jewish messianic thinking that was just as active as the belief that the messiah would be an all conquering hero.[8]

References

  1. ^ Harrington, Daniel J. The Gospel of Matthew. Liturgical Press, 1991 pg. 45
  2. ^ Clarke, Howard W. The Gospel of Matthew and its Readers: A Historical Introduction to the First Gospel. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003.
  3. ^ Gundry, Robert H. Matthew a Commentary on his Literary and Theological Art. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1982.
  4. ^ France, R.T. The Gospel According to Matthew: an Introduction and Commentary. Leicester: Inter-Varsity, 1985. pg. 93
  5. ^ France, R.T. The Gospel According to Matthew: an Introduction and Commentary. Leicester: Inter-Varsity, 1985.
  6. ^ Craig S. Keener. A commentary on the Gospel of Matthew. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1999. pg. 114
  7. ^ Goulder, M.D. Midrash and Lection in Matthew. London: SPCK, 1974.
  8. ^ France, R.T. The Gospel According to Matthew: an Introduction and Commentary. Leicester: Inter-Varsity, 1985. pg. 94


Gospel of Matthew
Preceded by:
Matthew 2:22
Chapter 2 Followed by:
Matthew 3:1

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Matthew — ist eine englische Form von Matthias und der Vorname folgender Personen: Matthew Bentley (* 1979), US amerikanischer Wrestler Matthew Best (* 1957), britischer Dirigent Matthew Broderick (* 1962), US amerikanischer Schauspieler Matthew Delaney… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Matthew — 1 Matthew 2 Matthew 3 Matthew 4 Matthew 5 Matthew 6 Matthew 7 Matthew 8 Matthew 9 Matthew 10 Matthew 11 Matthew 12 …   The King James version of the Bible

  • Matthew 5:22 — is the twenty second verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament and is part of the Sermon on the Mount. It is the first of what have traditionally been known as the Antitheses, in which Jesus compares the current… …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 28:12 — is the twelfth verse of the twenty eighth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. This verse is part of the resurrection narrative. In this verse the guards of the tomb, after being present for an angel hearkening the resurrection …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 28:8 — is the eight verse of the twenty eighth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. This verse is part of the resurrection narrative. Mary Magdalene and the other Mary had just encountered an angel has appeared at the empty tomb of… …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 4:14–15 — Matthew 4:14 15 are the fourteenth and fifteenth verse of the fourth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. In the previous verses Jesus returned to Galilee after hearing of the arrest of John the Baptist and then left Nazareth… …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 4:16 — is the sixteenth verse of the fourth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. In the previous verses Jesus returned to Galilee after hearing of the arrest of John the Baptist and then left Nazareth for Capernaum. This verse contains …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 5:32 — is the thirty second verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament and is part of the Sermon on the Mount. This much scrutinized verse contains part of Jesus teachings on the issue of divorce. Contents 1 Text 2 Debate… …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 1:17 — is the seventeenth verse of the first chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. The verse is the conclusion to the section where the genealogy of Joseph, the father of Jesus, is listed. Contents 1 Text 2 Reasons for the summary 3 …   Wikipedia

  • Matthew 28:11 — is the eleventh verse of the twenty eighth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. This verse is part of the resurrection narrative. In this verse the guards of the tomb, after being present for an angel hearkening the resurrection …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.