European Commission roaming regulations

European Union European Union regulation:
Regulation (EC) No 717/2007
Regulation on roaming on public mobile telephone networks within the Community
(Text with EEA relevance)
Made by European Parliament & Council
Made under Art. 95 TEC
Journal reference L171 Vol. 50 2007-06-29, pp. 32–40
History
Made 2007-06-27
Came into force 2007-06-30
Preparative texts
Commission proposal 2006-07-12
EP opinion Approved
Other legislation
Amends Directive 2002/21/EC
Amended by
Replaced by
Status: Current legislation

The European Commission started its work on roaming prices in July 1999, by opening a sector inquiry. This process lasted for years, without delivering any real results, even though, six years after the beginning of the enquiry, the Commission had notified two statements of objections to British and German mobile operators (access to their networks for foreign operators was considerably more expensive than for domestic service providers) for the 1997–2003 period. The case was closed without any sanction,[1] while Neelie Kroes was in charge of Competition for the European Commission.

Regulation on roaming charges in the European Union is a part of Politics of the European Union concerning the telecommunication industry and aimed to reduce roaming prices for mobile telephone subscribers travelling within European Union and European Economic Area member states. It is regulated by the European Commission.

The regulation's official name is "Regulation (EC) No 717/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2007 on roaming on public mobile telephone networks within the Community and amending Directive 2002/21/EC".

Prices within this regulation are sometimes referred with the "Eurotariff" name.

Contents

General information

The European Commission had repeatedly urged mobile operators to lower the charges for using mobile phones abroad, but they remained on average four times more expensive than domestic mobile phone calls. The data rates are 500 to 1,000 times more expensive than domestic rates. To highlight the continuing problem, the Commission launched a consumer website on roaming tariffs in October 2005. It exposed roaming prices of up to 12 euros for a 4-minute call. As even this did not change the pricing behaviour of mobile operators, the Commission proposed to intervene by regulating. The proposal for a regulation to lower international roaming charges within the EU was published by the Commission in July 2006.

After proposal there was a public consultation on the roaming prices where people could express their opinion regarding this matter.

Primarily changes of the existing situation were backed by Viviane Reding, EU Commissioner for Information Society and Media. Finally, after debates the Regulation was approved by European parliament. The regulation caps the rates operators can charge each other while roaming in the EU and also limits the tariffs an operator can charge from customers.

The regulation entered into force on 30 June 2007. From this date on, mobile phone operators within the European Union were required to inform customers about the new tariffs (called "Eurotariff") within one month (i.e. by 31 July 2007) and provide an offer for switching to the new tariff. If a customer responded to this offer, the mobile phone operator had to switch them to the new tariff within at most one month. If they did not respond, the new tariff automatically applied the latest on 30 September 2007, unless a special roaming package applied. The ceilings or Eurotariff gradually decreases every year. Operators are able to compete below maximum allowed level.

A Eurotariff is available in all 27 Member States of the European Union and in the 3 European Economic Area countries. It applies no matter if you are a pre-paid or post-paid customer. Switching to a Eurotariff is free of charge with no effect on your existing mobile phone contract. Also subscribers receive an SMS when crossing the border to another EU or EEA Member State informing them about the price (including all taxes) for making and receiving calls. This message is free. It also contains phone number where subscriber can call to find out more detailed prices by SMS or over the phone. Calling this number is free of charge.

Another decision made in October 2007 specified that this matter has relevance for the European Economic Area (EEA) states. This means that the tariffs caps apply to EEA member states (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) as of 1 January 2008.[2] That meant that subscribers from EU benefit from the same price caps when travelling within the EEA and vice versa.

In the middle of 2008 the Commission asked for comments on the review of the roaming rules and their possible extension to SMS and data roaming services. 39 questions were raised about the general functioning of the roaming regulation as well as specific issues concerning:

  • Inadvertent roaming or involuntary roaming, when consumers use their mobile phone close to the border of a neighbouring country and are connected to a foreign network.
  • The effect of the rules on smaller operators and on domestic prices: have the new rules led to an increase in domestic prices?
  • The issue of actual vs. billed call duration: has there been any change from per second to per minute billing as a result of the new rules?
  • The need to extend the duration of the rules.
  • The need for similar rules concerning data and SMS roaming services at wholesale and/or retail levels in light of current retail prices and market developments.

A regulation on SMS was studied by the EU Commission. Commissioner Viviane Reding gave operators until 1 July 2008 to lower SMS and data roaming charges. The Commission then sent letters to the CEOs of all European mobile operators inquiring about their SMS and data prices. The assessment showed that prices were still too high.

The Commission reported back to the European Parliament and the Council in the end of 2008 on the need to review existing roaming rules. To prepare this report, the Commission consulted the public up to 2 July 2008.

Based on this assessment and the public consultation EU Commission decided to introduce maximum price limits for sending SMS messages while roaming. The European Regulators Group (ERG) suggested a level between 11 and 15 eurocents.

A wholesale price capon Internet roaming was introduced on 1 July 2009 and a price cap for end users is likely going to be introduced on 1 July 2012. Customers traveling to another Member State receive an automated message of the charges that apply for data roaming services.

Under new rules as of 1 July 2009, consumers also benefit from per-second billing after 30 seconds for calls made, and per-second billing throughout for calls received to ensure that consumers do not face any 'hidden costs' when they are roaming. This was expected to increase consumers savings by over 20%.

Since 1 July 2010, operators must provide customers with the opportunity to determine in advance how much they want to spend before the service is disabled ("cut-off").

The Commission, together with the National Regulatory Authorities, monitored the development of the prices. If normal market conditions had been established in the market for roaming calls, the regulation was meant to expire in three years from 2007 (30 June 2010). However, the Commission could also propose to continue to regulate the roaming market, if normal market conditions were not working yet. Under the latest proposal this regulation would be extended to 30 June 2016.

Following an investigation into the costs of the absence of a Single Market in telecoms, the European Commission intends to take further measures with the objective of, for example, ensuring that the difference between roaming and national prices should approach zero by 2015.[3] A public consultation by the European Commission on future roaming regulation took place in December 2010 – February 2011.

The Commission suggested the next regulation in a report to the European Parliament, on 6 July 2011.[4] The Commission wants[5] to extend price ceilings on roaming services both at wholesale and retail (including for mobile Internet) levels. The validity of the new regulation would be extended to 10 years, with retail prices ceiling maintained until July 2016, and wholesale ceilings maintained until 2022 (but with stable prices over 2015–2022). The newest feature would be the introduction of preselection (including from MVNOs) for roaming services, starting July 2014. This scheme, according to Neelie Kroes[6] is supposed to allow to reach the stated 2015 objective of a close to zero difference between domestic and roaming prices, even though the report to EU Parliament states, on page 9, that the scheme "will require time to [...] produce effects on the market". In August 2011, the European Regulator, BEREC, criticised the Commission proposal as unable to bring a structural solution, in a report to the EU Parliament.[7]

Members

Currently roaming regulation is applied to and within 30 countries: all 27 EU members and three non-EU members (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway). The EU countries apply the roaming regulation since 30 August 2007 while the non-EU countries apply the regulation since 1 January 2008.

Prices

Common limits

In force from 30 Aug 2007 30 Aug 2008 1 Jul 2009 1 Jul 2010 1 Jul 2011 1 Jul 2012 1 Jul 2013 1 Jul 2014 1 Jul 2016
In force until 29 Aug 2008 30 Jun 2009 30 Jun 2010 30 Jun 2011 30 Jun 2012 30 Jun 2013 30 Jun 2014 30 Jun 2016 30 Jun 2022
Service Unit Roaming limits in EU and EEA countries
(all the prices are in euros without VAT)[8][9][10][11][12]
Applies to all subscribers
Outgoing calls to any EU and EEA number price of 1 minute 0.49 0.46 0.43 0.39 0.35 0.32 0.28 0.24
billing interval per-second starting from 31st second per-second starting from 31st second
Incoming calls from any number price of 1 minute 0.24 0.22 0.19 0.15 0.11 0.11 0.10
billing interval per-second starting from 1st second per-second starting from 1st second
Incoming calls redirected to voice mail [a 1] price of 1 minute 0.73 0.68 0.62 free of charge free of charge
Outgoing SMS to any EU and EEA number price of 1 message 0.11 0.10
Incoming SMS from any number price of 1 message free of charge
Data transfer price of 1 Megabyte 0.90 0.70 0.50
billing interval per 1 kilobyte starting from 1st kilobyte
monthly default cut-off limit 50.00 50.00
Right to choose different operator for roaming [a 2][13] +
Default notification SMS with roaming prices +
Free number to call for detailed roaming prices +
Free '112' access in roaming +
Applies only to operators
Outgoing calls to any EU and EEA number price of 1 minute 0.30 0.28 0.26 0.22 0.18 0.14 0.10 0.06
billing interval per-second starting from 31st second
Outgoing SMS to any EU and EEA number price of 1 message 0.04 0.03 0.02
Incoming SMS from any number price of 1 message free of charge
Data transfer price of 1 Megabyte 1.00 0.80 0.50 0.30 0.20 0.10
billing interval per 1 kilobyte starting from 1st kilobyte
Right to use other operators' networks in other Member States at regulated wholesale prices[13] +
Legend

+
Not regulated
Regulated
Past Active Future Proposal [a 3][14][15]
  1. ^ When incoming calls are redirected to voice mail, operators can charge for message recording as much as a sum of their tariffs for incoming calls and outgoing calls back to home country. Beginning on 1 July 2010 operators cannot charge their roaming customers for the receipt by them of a roaming voice mail message. Listening to such messages could still be charged as an outgoing call in the future.
  2. ^ Customer would have the option to sign for roaming contract, separate from national mobile services, while keeping the same phone number and SIM card.
  3. ^ Proposal presented by the European Commission on 6 July 2011 (currently under negotiations with European Parliament and Council or awaiting final approval)

Exchange rates

For services paid for in currencies other than the euro, the amount in euros is converted to the other currency using the reference rates published in the Official Journal of the European Union on 29 June 2007[citation needed], 30 July 2008,[16] 6 May 2009,[17] 1 June 2010 and 1 June 2011.

Exchange rate published in EU's Official Journal 29 Jun 2007 30 Jun 2008 6 May 2009 1 Jun 2010
[18][19][20]
1 Jun 2011
[20][21][22][23]
In force from 30 Aug 2007 [b 1] 30 Aug 2008 1 Jul 2009 1 Jul 2010 1 Jul 2011
In force until 29 Aug 2008 30 Jun 2009 30 Jun 2010 30 Jun 2011 30 Jun 2012
Non-euro EU currencies Exchange rate (units per 1 euro):[24]
Bulgarian lev 1.9558 1.9558 1.9558 1.9558 1.9558
Cypriot pound 0.5837 [b 2] ---
Czech koruna 28.718 23.941 26.805 25.505 24.547
Danish krone 7.4422 7.4619 7.4485 7.4395 7.4561
Estonian kroon 15.6466 15.6466 15.6466 15.6466 [b 3] ---
Hungarian forint 246.15 231.72 285.83 275.53 266.85
Latvian lats 0.6963 0.7042 0.7093 0.7090 0.7095
Lithuanian litas 3.4528 3.4528 3.4528 3.4528 3.4528
Maltese pound 0.4293 [b 2] ---
Polish złoty 3.7677 3.2185 4.4135 4.0791 3.9558
Pound sterling 0.6740 0.7867 0.8861 0.84863 0.87205
Romanian leu 3.1340 3.5381 4.1592 4.1855 4.128
Slovak koruna 33.635 30.395 [b 4] ---
Swedish krona 9.2525 9.4490 10.616 9.6230 8.8932
EEA currencies Exchange rate (units per 1 euro):[24]
Icelandic króna 84.26 124.54 unclear [b 5] unclear [b 5] unclear [b 5]
Norwegian krone 7.9725 8.0430 8.6350 7.9420 7.759
Swiss franc [b 6] 1.6553 1.6315 1.5089 1.4183 1.2275
Past
Active
Future
--- Not regulated
  1. ^ For Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway the listed rates came in force from 2008.01.01.
  2. ^ a b In euro from 1 January 2008.
  3. ^ In euro from 1 January 2011.
  4. ^ In euro from 1 January 2009.
  5. ^ a b c The ECB no longer publishes exchange rates for the ISK to the EUR.[25] The latest rate published is 290 ISK/EUR, posted on 2008.12.09. The mid rate published by the Central Bank of Iceland on 2009.05.06 was 168.26 ISK/EUR.[26]
  6. ^ Currency of Liechtenstein.

Local price limits

Method of calculating

As the VAT rates and currencies vary across the EU and EEA, the European Commission publishes price caps in euro and excluding VAT. So the final prices for each country can be calculated by adding the corresponding VAT rate and converting to the currency of the country (if non-euro).

For countries using the euro For countries using currency other than euro
x = \left(1+\frac{\text{VAT}}{100}\right) \cdot EC_{\text{rate}} x = \left(1+\frac{\text{VAT}}{100}\right) \cdot EC_\text{rate} \cdot Ex_\text{rate}
where
ECrate is European Commission maximum allowed tariff without VAT in euro
VAT is Value Added Tax rate for specified country, given in per cent
Exrate is Exchange rate for specified country published by ECB

Local prices

In force from 30 Aug 2007
[c 1]
30 Aug 2008 1 Jul 2009 1 Jul 2010 1 Jul 2011 30 Aug 2007
[c 1]
30 Aug 2008 1 Jul 2009 1 Jul 2010 1 Jul 2011 1 Jul 2009 1 Jul 2010 1 Jul 2011
In force until 29 Aug 2008 30 Jun 2009 30 Jun 2010 30 Jun 2011 30 Jun 2012 29 Aug 2008 30 Jun 2009 30 Jun 2010 30 Jun 2011 30 Jun 2012 30 Jun 2010 30 Jun 2011 30 Jun 2012
Country VAT rate
[27]
Maximum price in local currency and inclusive VAT for:
Outgoing calls to EU and EEA numbers
(for 1 minute)
Incoming calls from any number
(for 1 minute)
Outgoing SMS to EU and EEA
(for 1 message)
 Austria 20 %[28] 0.588 EUR 0.552 EUR 0.516 EUR 0.468 EUR 0.420 EUR 0.288 EUR 0.264 EUR 0.228 EUR 0.180 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR
 Belgium 21 %[29][30] 0.592 EUR 0.556 EUR 0.520 EUR 0.471 EUR 0.423 EUR 0.290 EUR 0.266 EUR 0.229 EUR 0.181 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR
 Bulgaria 20 %[31] 1.150 BGN 1.079 BGN 1.009 BGN 0.915 BGN 0.821 BGN 0.563 BGN 0.516 BGN 0.445 BGN 0.352 BGN 0.258 BGN 0.258 BGN 0.258 BGN 0.258 BGN
 Cyprus 15 %[32] 0.328 CYP
0.563 EUR
[c 2]
0.529 EUR 0.494 EUR 0.448 EUR 0.402 EUR 0.161 CYP
0.276 EUR
[c 2]
0.253 EUR 0.218 EUR 0.172 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR
 Czech Republic 19 %[33]
20 %[c 3]
16.745 CZK 13.105 CZK 13.716 CZK
13.831 CZK
[c 4]
11.936 CZK 10.309 CZK 8.201 CZK 6.267 CZK 6.060 CZK
6.111 CZK
[c 4]
4.590 CZK 3.240 CZK 3.508 CZK
3.538 CZK
[c 4]
3.366 CZK 3.240 CZK
 Denmark 25 %[35] 4.558 DKK 4.290 DKK 4.003 DKK 3.626 DKK 3.262 DKK 2.232 DKK 2.052 DKK 1.769 DKK 1.394 DKK 1.025 DKK 1.024 DKK 1.022 DKK 1.025 DKK
 Estonia 18 %
20 %[36][c 5]
9.046 EEK 8.492 EEK 8.073 EEK 7.322 EEK
0.468 EUR
[c 6]
0.420 EUR 4.431 EEK 4.061 EEK 3.567 EEK 2.816 EEK
0.180 EUR
[c 6]
0.132 EUR 2.065 EEK 2.065 EEK
0.132 EUR
[c 6]
0.132 EUR
 Finland 22 %
23 %[c 7]
0.597 EUR 0.561 EUR 0.524 EUR 0.479 EUR 0.430 EUR 0.292 EUR 0.268 EUR 0.231 EUR 0.184 EUR 0.135 EUR 0.134 EUR 0.135 EUR 0.135 EUR
 France 19.6 %[40] 0.586 EUR 0.550 EUR 0.514 EUR 0.466 EUR 0.418 EUR 0.287 EUR 0.263 EUR 0.227 EUR 0.179 EUR 0.131 EUR 0.131 EUR 0.131 EUR 0.131 EUR
 Germany 19 %[41] 0.583 EUR 0.547 EUR 0.511 EUR 0.464 EUR 0.416 EUR 0.285 EUR 0.261 EUR 0.226 EUR 0.178 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR
 Greece 19 %
21 %
23 %[c 8]
0.583 EUR 0.547 EUR 0.511 EUR
0.520 EUR
0.479 EUR 0.430 EUR 0.285 EUR 0.261 EUR 0.226 EUR
0.229 EUR
0.184 EUR 0.135 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.135 EUR 0.135 EUR
 Hungary 20 %
25%[c 9]
144.73 HUF 127.90 HUF 153.63 HUF 134.32 HUF 116.74 HUF 70.89 HUF 61.17 HUF 67.88 HUF 51.66 HUF 36.69 HUF 39.30 HUF 37.88 HUF 36.69 HUF
 Ireland 21 %
21.5 %[c 10]
0.592 EUR 0.556 EUR
0.558 EUR
[c 11]
0.522 EUR 0.473 EUR 0.425 EUR 0.290 EUR 0.266 EUR
0.267 EUR
[c 11]
0.230 EUR 0.182 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR 0.133 EUR
 Italy 20 % 0.588 EUR 0.552 EUR 0.516 EUR 0.468 EUR 0.420 EUR 0.288 EUR 0.264 EUR 0.228 EUR 0.180 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR
 Latvia 18 %
21 %
22 %[c 12]
0.402 LVL 0.382 LVL
0.391 LVL
[c 13]
0.369 LVL 0.334 LVL
0.337 LVL
0.302 LVL 0.197 LVL 0.182 LVL
0.187 LVL
[c 13]
0.163 LVL 0.128 LVL
0.129 LVL
0.095 LVL 0.094 LVL 0.094 LVL
0.095 LVL
0.095 LVL
 Lithuania 18 %
19 %[c 14]
1.996 LTL 1.874 LTL
1.890 LTL
[c 13]
1.766 LTL 1.602 LTL 1.438 LTL 0.977 LTL 0.896 LTL
0.903 LTL
0.780 LTL 0.616 LTL 0.451 LTL 0.451 LTL 0.451 LTL 0.451 LTL
 Luxembourg 15 % 0.563 EUR 0.529 EUR 0.494 EUR 0.448 EUR 0.402 EUR 0.276 EUR 0.253 EUR 0.218 EUR 0.172 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR 0.126 EUR
 Malta 18 % 0.248 MTL
0.578 EUR
[c 2]
0.542 EUR 0.507 EUR 0.460 EUR 0.413 EUR 0.121 MTL
0.283 EUR
[c 2]
0.259 EUR 0.224 EUR 0.177 EUR 0.129 EUR 0.129 EUR 0.129 EUR 0.129 EUR
 Netherlands 19 % 0.583 EUR 0.547 EUR 0.511 EUR 0.464 EUR 0.416 EUR 0.285 EUR 0.261 EUR 0.226 EUR 0.178 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR
 Poland 22 %
23 %[c 15]
2.252 PLN 1.806 PLN 2.320 PLN 1.940 PLN
1.956 PLN
1.702 PLN 1.103 PLN 0.863 PLN 1.025 PLN 0.746 PLN
0.752 PLN
0.535 PLN 0.593 PLN 0.547 PLN
0.551 PLN
0.535 PLN
 Portugal 20 % 0.588 EUR 0.552 EUR 0.516 EUR 0.468 EUR 0.420 EUR 0.288 EUR 0.264 EUR 0.228 EUR 0.180 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR
 Romania 19 %
24%
1.827 RON 1.936 RON 2.128 RON 2.024 RON 1.791 RON 0.895 RON 0.926 RON 0.940 RON 0.778 RON 0.563 RON 0.544 RON 0.570 RON 0.563 RON
 Slovakia 19 % 19.612 SKK 16.638 SKK
0.547 EUR
[c 13]
0.511 EUR 0.464 EUR 0.416 EUR 9.606 SKK 7.957 SKK
0.261 EUR
[c 13]
0.226 EUR 0.178 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR 0.130 EUR
 Slovenia 20 % 0.588 EUR 0.552 EUR 0.516 EUR 0.468 EUR 0.420 EUR 0.288 EUR 0.264 EUR 0.228 EUR 0.180 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR 0.132 EUR
 Spain 16 % 0.568 EUR 0.533 EUR 0.498 EUR 0.452 EUR 0.406 EUR 0.278 EUR 0.255 EUR 0.220 EUR 0.174 EUR 0.127 EUR 0.127 EUR 0.127 EUR 0.127 EUR
 Sweden 25 % 5.667 SEK 5.433 SEK 5.706 SEK 4.691 SEK 3.890 SEK 2.775 SEK 2.598 SEK 2.521 SEK 1.804 SEK 1.222 SEK 1.459 SEK 1.323 SEK 1.222 SEK
 UK 17.5 %
15 %
17.5 %[c 16]
20 %[50]
0.39 GBP 0.43 GBP
0.42 GBP[c 17]
0.44 GBP 0.19 GBP 0.20 GBP 0.19 GBP
0.20 GBP[c 18]
0.11 GBP
 Iceland 24.5 % 51.40 ISK 71.32 ISK unclear[c 19]
0.54 EUR
unclear[c 19]
77.09 ISK
0.54 EUR
unclear[c 19]
72.48 ISK
0.57 EUR
25.18 ISK 34.11 ISK unclear[c 19]
0.24 EUR
unclear[c 19]
0.14 EUR
 Liechtenstein 7.5 % 0.87 CHF 0.81 CHF 0.70 CHF 0.43 CHF 0.39 CHF 0.31 CHF 0.18 CHF
 Norway 25 % 4.883 NOK 4.624 NOK 4.641 NOK 3.870 NOK 3.394 NOK 2.391 NOK 2.211 NOK 2.050 NOK 1.488 NOK 1.066 NOK 1.187 NOK 1.091 NOK 1.066 NOK
Past
Active
Future
  1. ^ a b For Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway the listed rates came in force from 1 Jan 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 31 December 2007, the bottom rate was valid between 1 January 2008 and 29 August 2008.
  3. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 31 December 2009, the bottom rate is valid from 1 January 2010.[34]
  4. ^ a b c The top rate was valid between 1 Jul 2009 and 31 Dec 2009, the bottom rate was valid between 1 Jan 2010 and 30 Jun 2010.
  5. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 30 June 2009, the bottom rate is valid from 01.07.2009.[37]
  6. ^ a b c The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 31 December 2010, the bottom rate is valid from 1 January 2011.
  7. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 30 June 2010, the bottom rate is valid from 01.07.2010.[38][39]
  8. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 14 March 2010, the middle rate was valid between 15 March 2010 and 30 June 2010, the bottom rate is valid from 01.07.2010.[42][43]
  9. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 30 June 2009, the bottom rate is valid since 01.07.2009.[citation needed]
  10. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 30 November 2008, the bottom rate is valid from 01.12.2008.[44]
  11. ^ a b The top rate was valid between 30 Aug 2008 and 30 November 2008, the bottom rate was valid between 1 Dec 2008 and 30 Jun 2009.
  12. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 31 December 2008, the middle rate was valid between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010, the bottom rate is valid since 1 January 2011.[45][46]
  13. ^ a b c d e The top rate was valid between 30 August 2008 and 31 December 2008, the bottom rate was valid between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2009.
  14. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2007 and 31 December 2008, the bottom rate is valid from 1 January 2009.[citation needed]
  15. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 July 2007 and 31 December 2010, the bottom rate is valid since 1 January 2011.[47]
  16. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 July 2007 and 30 November 2008, the middle rate is valid between 01.12.2008 and 31 December 2009, the bottom rate will be valid from 1 January 2010.[48][49]
  17. ^ The top rate was valid between 30 August 2008 and 30 November 2008, the bottom rate was valid between 01.12.2008 and 30 June 2009.
  18. ^ The top rate was valid between 01.07.2009 and 31 December 2009, the bottom rate was valid between 1 January 2010 and 30 June 2010.
  19. ^ a b c d e The ECB no longer publishes exchange rates for the ISK to the EUR. The latest rate published is 290 ISK/EUR, posted on 2008-12-09. The mid rate published by the Central Bank of Iceland on 2009-05-06 was 168.26 ISK/EUR.[51]

As can be seen from this table, exchange rate fluctuations has resulted in the maximum price in some countries (such as the United Kingdom) increasing each year, despite the value in euro cents constantly decreasing.

Rounding

The charge limits for the Eurotariff and the wholesale average charge should be calculated to the maximum number of decimal places permitted by the official exchange rate. This sets the maximum that can be charged in the national currency. Providers may wish in practice to quote charges in whole numbers of currency units, especially at the retail level, although this in practice is not compulsory. In this case, the numbers should be rounded down. Rounding up of these numbers to above the level of the relevant cap is not permitted under any circumstances.[52]

See also

  • Roaming
  • Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC)
  • Telecoms Package

External links

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • European Union law — European Union This article is part of the series: Politics and government of the European Union …   Wikipedia

  • European Court of Justice — Not to be confused with the European Court of Human Rights, the court of the Council of Europe. ECJ redirects here. For the collective judicial institutions of the European Union, see Court of Justice of the European Union. For other uses, see… …   Wikipedia

  • Legislature of the European Union — European Union This article is part of the series: Politics and government of the European Union …   Wikipedia

  • Directive (European Union) — European Union This article is part of the series: Politics and government of the European Union …   Wikipedia

  • Court of Justice of the European Union — Not to be confused with the European Court of Human Rights, the supranational court based in Strasbourg. Court of Justice of the European Union Established 1952 …   Wikipedia

  • Community acquis — European Union This article is part of the series: Politics and government of the European Union …   Wikipedia

  • Germany — /jerr meuh nee/, n. a republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 84,068,216; 137,852 sq.… …   Universalium

  • List of Statutory Instruments of the United Kingdom, 2007 — This is an incomplete list of Statutory Instruments of the United Kingdom in 2007. NOTOC 1 100* Cider and Perry and Wine and Made wine (Amendment) Regulations 2007 S.I. 2007/4 * Customs and Excise (Personal Reliefs for Special Visitors)… …   Wikipedia

  • Direct effect — For the Direct effect model of media influence, see hypodermic needle model. Direct effect should not be confused with Vertical effect and debates over the Horizontal effect of the British Human Rights Act Direct effect is the principle of… …   Wikipedia

  • Direct applicability — A concept of European Union constitutional law that relates specifically to regulations, direct applicability (or the characteristic of regulations to be directly effective) is set out in Article 288 (ex Article 249) of the Treaty on the… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.