Mound Cemetery (Marietta, Ohio)

Mound Cemetery Mound
Mound Cemetery with Great Mound in background
Mound Cemetery (Marietta, Ohio) is located in Ohio
Location: 5th and Scammel Sts., Marietta, Ohio
Coordinates: 39°25′13″N 81°26′33″W / 39.42028°N 81.4425°W / 39.42028; -81.4425Coordinates: 39°25′13″N 81°26′33″W / 39.42028°N 81.4425°W / 39.42028; -81.4425
Governing body: Local
NRHP Reference#:

73001549

[1]
Added to NRHP: February 23, 1973
Great Mound with William Stacy marker in foreground

Mound Cemetery in Marietta, Ohio is home to the Great Mound (aka Conus, Mound Cemetery Mound), built by the Mound Builders,[2] and is reportedly home to the largest number of American Revolutionary War officers buried in one location.[3][4] The Great Mound was preserved by the original pioneers and city founders of the Ohio Company of Associates. Many of the founders were officers of the Revolutionary War who received land grants for military services. Among the officers of the American Revolutionary War buried in Mound Cemetery are General Rufus Putnam, General Benjamin Tupper, Commodore Abraham Whipple, and Colonel William Stacy.

It was stated at the Conference that “more officers of the Revolution are buried in the Old Mound Cemetery, Marietta, than at any other place in the United States.”
 
DAR, American Monthly, Vol. 16 (Jan-Jun 1900), 329.

General Lafayette of France, who fought with the Americans during the Revolution, visited Marietta during 1825, and described these Marietta settlers and former soldiers: "I knew them well. I saw them fighting the battles of their country…They were the bravest of the brave. Better men never lived."[5]

Contents

Great Mound or Conus

According to the Washington County Historical Society:

The origin and disappearance of the prehistoric Moundbuilders has long been shrouded in mystery. “Conus” is the burial place of chieftains. The mounds and earthworks were constructed between 800 B.C. and 700 A.D. These early inhabitants were the first farmers and artisans in the Ohio Valley and Marietta was the site of a Moundbuilders city.[6]

The conical Great Mound at Mound Cemetery is part of a mound complex known as the Marietta Earthworks, which includes the nearby Quadranaou and Capitolium platform mounds, the Sacra Via walled mounds (largely destroyed in 1843), and additional mounds.

The Great Mound or Conus is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Mound Cemetery Mound, site #73001549.

American Revolutionary War soldiers

The Washington County Historical Society compiled the following list of Revolutionary soldiers buried in Mound Cemetery:[6]

  1. Col. Robert Taylor, First Burial Here
  2. Gen. Joseph Buell
  3. Maj. Ezra Putnam
  4. Gen. Rufus Putnam
  5. Andrew McAllister
  6. Ephraim Foster
  7. Gershom Flagg
  8. John Holt
  9. Surgeon Jabez True
  10. Griffin Greene, Sr., Quartermaster
  11. Commodore Abraham Whipple
  12. Col. Ebenezer Sproat
  13. Col. William Stacy, Sr.
  14. Gen. Benjamin Tupper
  15. Maj. Anselm Tupper
  16. Maj. Joseph Lincoln
  17. Capt. Nathaniel Saltonstall
  18. Nathaniel Dodge
  19. Col. Enoch Shepherd
  20. Jeremiah Thomas
  21. Samuel Hildreth, Sr.
  22. Judge Dudley Woodbridge
  23. Sala Bosworth
  24. Levi Lankton
  25. Col. Ichabod Nye
  26. Ephraim Emerson
  27. Capt. Josiah Munro
  28. John Green
  29. James Hatch
  30. Capt. Stanton Prentiss
  31. Isaac Berry
  32. Capt. Joseph Rogers
  33. Matthew Kerr
  34. Capt. William Moulton, Jr.
  35. Nathan Evans
  36. Gen. Joseph Willcox
  37. Simeon Goodwin

Gallery

See also

  • List of burial mounds in the United States

References

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html. 
  2. ^ Summers, History of Marietta, 301-09.
  3. ^ DAR, American Monthly, Vol. 16 (Jan-Jun 1900), 329.
  4. ^ Johnson, What to see in America, 224.
  5. ^ Cutler, Life and Times of Ephraim Cutler, 202–03.
  6. ^ a b Washington County Historical Society, plaque at Mound Cemetery, dated 1968.

Bibliography

  • Cotton, Willia Dawson: Sketch of Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Ohio, Marietta Register Print, Marietta, Ohio (1900). This historical book is available online via the Google Books Library Project at Mound Cemetery, Cotton.
  • Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR): American Monthly, Vol. 16, Jan-Jun 1900, R. R. Bowker Co., New York (1900) p. 329.
  • Hawley, Owen: Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Ohio, Washington County Historical Society, Marietta, Ohio (1996).
  • Johnson, Clifton: What to see in America, Macmillan Co., New York (1919) p. 224.
  • Summers, Thomas J.: History of Marietta, The Leader Publishing Co., Marietta, Ohio (1903) pp. 301–09. This historical book is available online via the Google Books Library Project at History of Marietta, Summers.

External links


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