Comes sacrarum largitionum

The insignia of the comes s. largitionum in the Notitia Dignitatum: money bags and pieces of ore signifying his control over mines and mints, and the codicil of his appointment on a stand

The comes sacrarum largitionum ("Count of the Sacred Largesses", in Greek: κόμης τῶν θείων θησαυρῶν, "Count of the Sacred Treaures") was one of the senior fiscal officials of the late Roman Empire and the early Byzantine Empire.

Although it is first attested in 342/345, its creation must date to ca. 318, under Emperor Constantine the Great (r. 306–337). He was the successor of the Principate-era rationalis, and supervised those financial sectors that were left outside the purview of the praetorian prefects: the taxation of senators, the chrysargyron tax, customs duties, mines, mints and state-run mills and textile factories. Initially, the comes also controlled the emperor's private domains, but these passed under the control of the comes rerum privatarum by the end of the 4th century. He also exercised some judicial functions related to taxation.

The comes gradually declined in importance after the late 5th century, especially after Emperor Anastasius I (r. 491–518) abolished the hated chrysargyron. He remained however one of the main fiscal ministers, controlling an array of bureaus (scrinia) and with an extensive staff detached to the provinces. The last comes is mentioned under the Emperor Phocas (r. 602–610). He was succeeded by the sakellarios and the logothetes tou genikou, who remained the chief fiscal ministers in the middle Byzantine period (7th–11th centuries).

See also

Sources


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  • COMES sacrarum Largitionum — vide supra …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Comes — (  /ˈkoʊm …   Wikipedia

  • Comes (Rome Antique) — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Comes. Le terme comes (pluriel comites) signifie en latin associé , compagnon . Il fut donc utilisé sous la république romaine pour désigner ceux qui accompagnait un magistrat, comme un gouverneur de province, et …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Comes — Comes, Plural Comites (lateinisch für „Begleiter“, Gefährte „Gefolge“, von cum „mit“ und ire „gehen“) ist im Ursprung ein römischer Amtstitel, der im Laufe der Zeit mehrere Bedeutungen hatte, sowohl im zivilen Bereich für Statthalter und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Comes (Rome antique) — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Comes. Le terme comes (pluriel comites) signifie en latin associé , compagnon . Il fut donc utilisé sous la république romaine pour désigner ceux qui accompagnait un magistrat, comme un gouverneur de province, et …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Comes — Co|mes 〈m.; , od. Co|mi|tes; Mus.〉 Beantwortung (bzw. Wiederholung) des Fugenthemas; →a. Dux [lat., „Begleiter“] * * * Co|mes [ ko:mɛs ], der; , u. Comites […ite:s] [lat. comes = Begleiter]: 1. a) (im antiken Rom) hoher Beamter im kaiserlichen… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • COMES Vestiarii — in Notit. Imper. Occidental. sub Comite sacrarum Largitionum, pro quo in Oriente Magister lineae vestis, et Magister privatae ponuntur. Vide infra in voce Vestiarti Comes …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Comes — (lat., »Begleiter«) wurde in der republikanischen und der ersten Kaiserzeit vorzugsweise zur Bezeichnung der Römer gebraucht, welche die Statthalter in den Provinzen als Freunde und als Gehilfen in den Verwaltungsgeschäften zu begleiten pflegten …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • COMES — I. COMES Metallorum per Illyricum, ex auro in metallis invento portionem Principum debitam exigebat, in fluminibus etiam vel fodinis aurum legentes: sub dispositone Comitis sacrarum Largitionum, Notit. Imper. Vide l. 1. Cod. de Metallar. II.… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Comes —         (лат. спутник), первоначально сопровождающий знатного римлянина, особенно в поездках; позднее сопровождающий государств, сановников, в первую очередь наместников, в пров. В эпоху Римской империи С. входил в императорскую свиту, особенно… …   Словарь античности


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