List of closed New York City Subway stations

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system that serves four of the five boroughs of New York City in the U.S. state of New York: the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens. Its predecessors—the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT), and the Independent Subway System (IND)—were consolidated in 1940. Since then, stations of the New York City Subway have been permanently closed, either entirely or in part.

The largest number of closed New York City Subway stations consist of stations on abandoned and demolished elevated lines once operated by the IRT and the BMT, both of which were privately held companies. After their takeover by the City of New York (the IND was already owned and operated by New York City), the three former systems were no longer in competition with each other. Thus, elevated lines that duplicated underground lines were the first to close. Other elevated lines that did not create a redundancy in the system, such as the Bronx portion of the IRT Third Avenue Line and a major portion of the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line were later demolished. Two stations in which sections of track still operate have been demolished. The Dean Street station was demolished as part of the rebuilding of the BMT Franklin Avenue Line, and the Cortlandt Street station of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line was demolished after it sustained heavy damage caused by the September 11, 2001 attacks.

The remaining closed stations and portions of stations are intact and are abandoned. The exception is the Court Street station: it is the site of the New York Transit Museum, a museum that documents the history of public transportation in New York City. One of these abandoned stations, the outer platforms of the Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets station, is occasionally used for filming purposes. The criteria for closing stations, as explained by spokesman Charles Seaton, is: "We do not shut stations down because of low ridership. The only reason we have closed a station is because of its proximity to another station . . . The smaller stations are just as necessary as the larger ones."[1]

Contents

Permanently closed but existing stations

These stations are still intact but are not currently served by passenger trains. This list does not include closed platforms on a different level of an open station. For the one station that is currently closed on a temporary basis, see "Reopened and temporarily closed stations" below.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Former
Services
Notes
18th Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] 01948-11-08 November 8, 1948 NYCS 6 Between 23rd Street and 14th Street – Union Square. Closed after platform lengthening of both adjacent stations and the opening of new exits at 22nd Street and 15th Street deemed the 18th Street station to be within proximity.[3][4]
91st Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] 01959-02-02 February 2, 1959 NYCS 1 Between 96th Street and 86th Street. Closed after platform lengthening of the 96th Street platforms deemed the station to be within proximity.[5]
Anderson – Jerome Avenue A (IRT) Ninth Avenue elevated Bronx 01918-07-01 July 1, 1918 01958-08-31 August 31, 1958 North of the 155th Street station, the elevated line crossed the Harlem River and went into a tunnel similarly to how the 125th Street subway station comes out of the tunnel onto a high viaduct. This was done in both places to keep the grade of the tracks relatively level. Closed due to the discontinuation of the Polo Grounds Shuttle.
City Hall Loop A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] 01945-12-31 December 31, 1945 NYCS 6 South of Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall on a curved balloon loop. Closed due to low ridership and the proximity of the busier Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall station.[6] Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Court Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn 01936-04-09 April 9, 1936[7] 01946-06-01 June 1, 1946[8] Court Street Shuttle West of Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets. Closed due to low ridership and proximity to other Downtown Brooklyn stations. Site now houses the New York Transit Museum. [9][10]
Myrtle Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn 01915-06-22 June 22, 1915[11] 01956-07-01 July 1, 1956July 1956[12] Between the Manhattan Bridge and DeKalb Avenue. Closed due to proximity to DeKalb Avenue and construction of a flying junction to ease a choke point in the area.[12]
Sedgwick Avenue A (IRT) Ninth Avenue elevated Bronx 01918-07-01 July 1, 1918 01958-08-31 August 31, 1958 North of the 155th Street station, the elevated line crossed the Harlem River and went into a tunnel similarly to how the 125th Street subway station comes out of the tunnel onto a high viaduct. This was done in both places to keep the grade of the tracks relatively level. Closed due to the discontinuation of the Polo Grounds Shuttle.
South Ferry A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan 01918-07-01 July 1, 1918[2] 02009-03-16 March 16, 2009[13] NYCS 1 NYCS 5 NYCS 6 NYCS 9 Outer platform of station; south of Rector Street on a curved balloon loop. Closed when a new station with a longer island platform on two straighter tracks opened.
South Ferry A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01905-07-10 July 10, 1905[2] 01977-02-13 February 13, 1977 NYCS 5 Bowling Green–South Ferry Shuttle Inner platform of station; south of Bowling Green on a curved balloon loop. Closed due to low ridership and proximity to Bowling Green.[14]
Worth Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] 01962-09-01 September 1, 1962 NYCS 6 Between Canal Street and Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall. Closed after platform lengthening of the Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall platforms deemed the station to be within proximity.[15]

Open stations with closed platforms

These stations are currently in operation, but contain abandoned platforms either adjacent to or on another level from the open platforms. The entries under the "Line" column refer to the line in question, even if the line is defunct. The entries under the "Opened" and "Closed" columns refer to the platform in question.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Former
Services
Notes
002Second Avenue B (IND) Second Avenue Line Manhattan 01936-01-01 January 1, 1936[7] none Upper level space set aside for the IND Second System, but never completed. Under current plans, this space will not be used for Phase 3 of the Second Avenue Subway.
009Ninth Avenue B (BMT) Culver Line Brooklyn 01919-03-16 March 16, 1919[11] May 10, 1975 Culver Shuttle Lower platforms of the bi-level Ninth Avenue station.[16] Platforms abandoned after Culver Shuttle service was discontinued.[12] The line between 9th Ave and Ditmas Avenue was demolished in 1985.
14th Street – Union Square A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] NYCS 6 Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars, and use of island platforms to transfer to express service.
42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan 01932-09-10 September 10, 1932[7] 1981-03March 1981[9] NYCS E The lower level side platform on the southbound side was built with the upper level but not completed. It was completed in the 1950s and opened in September 1959 for Aqueduct Racetrack express service until that service's cessation in 1981.[9] It was also used for E service during the 1970s and as a crossunder during the station's history. It is being partially demolished to make way for the 7 Subway Extension.
59th Street – Columbus Circle B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan 01932-09-10 September 10, 1932[7] 1981 NYCS A NYCS D The center of three island platforms has been closed since 1981. Trains can't easily open their doors on both sides simultaneously. The edges of the platform were equipped with railings in the late-2000s, and re-opened as a transfer passageway to the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line platforms.
96th Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] May 2010 NYCS 1 Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed and were used as part of station entrances until 2010.
Atlantic Avenue B (BMT) Fulton Street elevated Brooklyn 1916 01956-04-26 April 26, 1956 Formerly a six track, three island platform station. Western-most island platform still in service for the BMT Canarsie Line. Center island platform still standing, but no tracks are installed. The center island platform was last used in 1956 for Fulton Street elevated service. Eastern-most tracks, platform and structure demolished in 2003–2004.
Bergen Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn 01933-03-20 March 20, 1933[7] 1976 NYCS F When express service on the Culver line ended in 1976, the lower level of this station closed and fell into disrepair. There are no plans to refurbish or reopen this level.
Broadway B (IND) Worth Street Line Brooklyn none Upper level with four island platforms and six tracks (similar to Hoyt–Schermerhorn) partially built for the IND Second System, but never completed.
Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01904-10-27 October 27, 1904[2] NYCS 6 Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars, and use of island platforms to transfer to express service. Curved portions of island platforms at the south end with Gap fillers closed.
Bowery B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan 01913-08-04 August 4, 1913[11] Fall 2004 NYCS J NYCS Z Due to the uptown track being rerouted to the former downtown express track, eastern island platform closed with all service on the western island platform.
Bowling Green A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 01905-07-10 July 10, 1905[2] 01977-02-13 February 13, 1977 Bowling Green–South Ferry Shuttle Western island platform used for shuttle service to South Ferry. Platform closed when shuttle service was discontinued.[14]
Canal Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan 01913-08-04 August 4, 1913[11] Fall 2004 NYCS J NYCS Z Due to the uptown track being rerouted to the former downtown express track, eastern island platform closed with all service on the western island platform.
Chambers Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan 01913-08-04 August 4, 1913[11] NYCS J NYCS Z Two side platforms and center island platform closed. Western and eastern island platforms still in service for downtown and uptown services respectively.
City Hall B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan 01918-01-05 January 5, 1918[11] none Two lower level island platforms originally to be served by express trains, were never completed. Express trains were rerouted over the Manhattan Bridge during construction.
DeKalb Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn 01915-06-22 June 22, 1915[11] 19601960[12] NYCS B NYCS D NYCS N NYCS Q NYCS R The island platforms were originally extended southward in 1927 on curves. Coincident with the reconstruction of switches, in 1960, the platforms were extended on a straight extension northward and the curved portions were closed.[12]
East 180th Street A (IRT) Dyre Avenue Line Bronx 01941-05-15 May 15, 1941[2] NYCS 5 Island platform east of the current East 180th Street platforms in operation. Platform abandoned after Dyre Avenue Line trains operated through service to the IRT White Plains Road Line.
East Broadway B (IND) Worth Street Line Manhattan 01936-04-09 April 9, 1936[7] none Upper level space set aside for the IND Second System, but never completed. It is currently part of the mezzanine.
Essex Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan 01908-09-16 September 16, 1908[17] 1948 Large open space south of station visible from platforms; Closed trolley terminal with multiple tracks and turning loops.
Gun Hill Road A (IRT) Third Avenue elevated Bronx 01920-10-04 October 4, 1920 01973-04-28 April 28, 1973 Upper level for the subway opened March 3, 1917 as part of the Dual Contracts. The lower level for the elevated was built at the same time but not opened until October 4, 1920. The lower level was an island platform with two tracks. The Third Avenue elevated closed on April 28, 1973. The lower level was demolished as part of a station rebuild in 2004-2006.
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn 01936-04-09 April 9, 1936[7] 1981-03March 1981[9] Court Street Shuttle The two outer platforms were originally intended for Court Street service. When that station closed, so did these platforms. They were opened again in September 1959 for Aqueduct Racetrack express service until that service's cessation in 1981.[9]
Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street B (BMT) 63rd Street Line Manhattan 01989-10-29 October 29, 1989[11] none Northern half of both levels never completed. Will be completed as part of Phase 1 of the Second Avenue Subway.
Mets – Willets Point A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens 01927-05-07 May 7, 1927[2] NYCS 7 The northern end of the very long southbound side platform is abandoned and gated off.
Myrtle Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn 01888-06-25 June 25, 1888 01969-10-04 October 4, 1969 Upper level used by the Myrtle Avenue Line prior to abandonment in 1969. Island platform still standing, but no tracks are installed.
Nevins Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn 01908-05-01 May 1, 1908[2] none Lower level side platform on the southbound side never completed or placed in service. This lower level was constructed as a provision for IRT service on Fulton Street (now IND), or IRT service on Fourth Ave (now BMT).
Pelham Bay Park A (IRT) Pelham Line Bronx 01920-12-20 December 20, 1920[2] NYCS 6 Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Jackson Heights – Roosevelt Avenue B (IND) Winfield Line Queens 01933-08-19 August 19, 1933[7] none Upper level with an island platform and two tracks built and tiled for the IND Second System, but no tracks or signals have been installed.
Utica Avenue B (IND) Utica Avenue Line Brooklyn 01936-04-09 April 9, 1936[7] none Upper level with two island platforms and four tracks partially built for the IND Second System, but never completed.
Van Cortlandt Park – 242nd Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Bronx 01908-08-01 August 1, 1908[2] NYCS 1 Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Wakefield – 241st Street A (IRT) White Plains Road Line Bronx 01920-12-13 December 13, 1920[2] NYCS 2 Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Woodlawn A (IRT) Jerome Ave Line Bronx 01918-04-15 April 15, 1918[2] NYCS 4 Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.

Demolished stations

These stations have been demolished, with little or no infrastructure in existence. For lines that have been demolished, see defunct lines.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Notes
Cortlandt Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan 01918-07-01 July 1, 1918[2] 02001-09-11 September 11, 2001[18] Severely damaged as a result of the September 11, 2001 attacks. It was demolished and will be rebuilt.[18] See also "Reopened and temporarily closed stations."
Dean Street B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn 01896-08-15 August 15, 1896[19][20] 01995-09-10 September 10, 1995[21] Between Franklin Avenue and Park Place. Demolished as part of the reconstruction of the BMT Franklin Avenue Line; also closed due to low ridership and proximity to adjacent stations.[21] See also "Reopened and temporarily closed stations."

Reopened and temporarily closed stations

These are stations that were officially closed and then reopened after a period of time. This list does not include stations that were closed due to rehabilitation. One station that is currently closed due to technical reasons that prohibit a safe opening is included here.

In addition to the two Cortlandt Street stations below, a number of stations were closed in Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. See Closings and cancellations following the September 11 attacks.

Station Division Line Borough Closed Reopened Notes
Cortlandt Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan 02001-09-11 September 11, 2001 02002-09-15 September 15, 2002 Closed when station sustained significant damage due to the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Cortlandt Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan 02005-08-20 August 20, 2005 02009-11-25 November 25, 2009 (northbound)[22]
02011-09-06 September 6, 2011 (southbound)[23]
The station was closed a second time for the construction of the Dey Street Passageway and by request of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to facilitate the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site.
Cortlandt Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan 02001-09-11 September 11, 2001 unknown Closed when station sustained severe damage due to it being near Ground zero of the September 11, 2001 attacks. Station has since been demolished and will be rebuilt while reconstruction of the World Trade Center site is being performed.[18] See also "Demolished stations."
Dean Street B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn 1899 01901-10-28 October 28, 1901 Closed due to low ridership. The station was reopened following protests.[citation needed] See also "Demolished stations."

See also

References and notes

  1. ^ Olshan, Jeremy (2006-08-21). "Lone Riders of the Rockaways: 256 a Day Use Sleepiest Subway Stop". New York Post. http://www.nypost.com/seven/08212006/news/regionalnews/lone_riders_of_the_rockaways_regionalnews_jeremy_olshan__transit_reporter.htm. Retrieved 2009-07-10. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Fischler, "The Subway," p. 239-240
  3. ^ Brennan, Joseph. ""18 St"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/18st.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  4. ^ "IRT STATION TO BE CLOSED; East Side Subway Trains to End Stops at 18th Street". The New York Times. 1948-11-06. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F40710F9385A157B93C4A9178AD95F4C8485F9. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  5. ^ Brennan, Joseph. ""91 St"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/91st.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  6. ^ Brennan, Joseph. ""City Hall (IRT)"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/cityirt.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i Fischler, "The Subway," p. 243-244
  8. ^ Fischler, "The Subway and the City," p. 503
  9. ^ a b c d e Brennan, Joseph. ""Court St, and Hoyt–Schermerhorns Sts platforms"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/court.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  10. ^ Fischler, "The Subway and the City," pp. 501–510
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Fischler, "The Subway," p. 241-242
  12. ^ a b c d e Brennan, Joseph. ""Myrtle Ave, and De Kalb Ave platforms"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/myrtle.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  13. ^ "MTA Opens New South Ferry Station" (Press release). New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2009-03-16. http://www.mta.info/mta/news/releases/?en=090316-HQ8. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  14. ^ a b Brennan, Joseph. ""Bowling Green & South Ferry platforms"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/bowling.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  15. ^ Brennan, Joseph. ""Worth St"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/worth.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  16. ^ The upper level platform is served by the BMT West End Line.
  17. ^ New York Times, Mayor Runs a Train Over New Bridge, September 17, 1908, page 16
  18. ^ a b c Brennan, Joseph. ""Cortlandt St"". Abandoned Stations. http://www.columbia.edu/~brennan/abandoned/cortlandt.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  19. ^ "New Route to Coney Island". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: p. 12. August 14, 1896. http://eagle.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/Default/Scripting/ArchiveView.asp?BaseHref=BEG/1896/08/14&Page=12&skin=BE. 
  20. ^ "First Trains to Brighton". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: p. 7. August 14, 1896. http://eagle.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/Default/Scripting/ArchiveView.asp?BaseHref=BEG/1896/08/14&Page=7&skin=BE. 
  21. ^ a b Pérez-Peña, Richard (1995-09-11). "A Subway Station Is Shuttered, the First in 33 Years". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1995/09/11/nyregion/a-subway-station-is-shuttered-the-first-in-33-years.html. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  22. ^ "Cortlandt Street R/W Subway Station Reopens". New York City Transit Authority. http://www.mta.info/mta/news/releases/?en=091125-HQ33. Retrieved 2009-11-26. 
  23. ^ Fermino, Jennifer (August 3, 2011). "G. Zero station set to reopen". New York Post. http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/zero_station_set_to_reopen_hzX7ruzYrrKOlWQoS80Z5M. Retrieved September 6, 2011. 

Further reading

  • Fischler, Stan (1997). The Subway: A Trip Through Time on New York's Rapid Transit. H & M Productions II Inc.. ISBN 1882608194. 
  • Fischler, Stan (2004). The Subway and the City: Celebrating a Century. with John Henderson. Frank Merriwell Incorporated. ISBN 0837392519. 
  • Dougherty, Peter (2007). Tracks of the New York City Subway v4.2. 

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