List of minor Marvel Comics characters


List of minor Marvel Comics characters

Throughout its history, Marvel Comics has introduced numerous characters in both its long running series, such as the Fantastic Four, and shorter series. Most of them can be considered minor characters. These range from supporting characters, heroes, and/or villains that appear infrequently to those that only take part in a single storyline or appear in a single comic book.

Contents: 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZSee alsoReferences


A

Armageddon

First appearance X-Men Millennial Visions (2000){{Verify source}}
Created by Jim Calafiore
Species Human Mutant
Teams X-Men
Abilities Superhuman strength, superhuman durability, telekinesis, all powers of both parents

Armageddon is a fictional character, a member of the X-Men, a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. He appeared in issues #41-42 of the Exiles. He is the son of Apocalypse from Nocturne's reality.

Armageddon was artificially created by Apocalypse through the genetic material of Apocalypse himself and Jean Grey as his ultimate weapon. Ironically, he rejected Apocalypse's methods and instead joined with his worst enemies, the X-Men.[volume & issue needed] He helped the X-Men destroy his father.[volume & issue needed]

He later joined the X-Men, not feeling as though he fit in with them.[volume & issue needed] Nightcrawler assured him his place was with the X-Men. He even helped the X-Men defeat the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants led by Cyclops.[volume & issue needed]

Another character named "Armageddon" is known to exist in the Marvel Universe; "Armageddon" is the English approximation of his actual name, Arm'Cheddon. He is the ruler of the alien Troyjan empire and the father of Trauma (a.k.a. Tro-Mah), and an enemy of the Hulk and the Pantheon. This Armageddon demonstrates the ability to manipulate cosmic energy to a degree which can harm the Silver Surfer, and is also shown with an artificial right hand, which can be removed and replaced with a weapon attachment.[1]

B

Moira Brandon

First appearance Avengers West Coast #100 (November 1993)
Created by Roy Thomas and Don Hudson

Moira Brandon is an actress and celebrity in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Roy Thomas and Don Hudson, only appeared in Avengers West Coast #100 (November 1993) as part of a flashback set prior to the formation of the West Coast Avengers.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Moira Brandon is a movie star famous for portraying characters like Joan of Arc and Cleopatra. During her later life she is approached by Hawkeye and Mockingbird who are looking for a California base for the Avengers. During the visit she saves the pair from Crossfire, with Hawkeye declaring her an honorary Avenger.[2]

Bullet Biker

First appearance Solo Avengers #13 (December 1988)
Created by Tom Defalco, Ralph Macchio and Ron Lim
Aliases Dillon Zarro

Bullet Biker is a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Tom Defalco and Ron Lim, first appeared in Solo Avengers #13 (December 1988). He has appeared as an occasional opponent to Hawkeye.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Dillon Zarro is a motorcycle stunt rider that worked for the Carson Carnival of Travelling Wonders. When Clint Barton's archery act becomes more popular than the stunt riding attraction, Zarro became consumed with jealousy. He quits the carnival, modifies his motorcycle, and becomes a daredevil supervillain known as the Bullet Biker. Years later, He is hired to destroy numerous art galleries in Los Angeles by an unknown benefactor. Hawkeye is brought in by the local authorities and quickly apprehendes him. Hawkeye recognises him as being Dillon Zarro, but does not disclose this identity as he is disgusted by his old friend's path in life.[3]

When the criminal mastermind Crossfire placea a bounty on Hawkeye's arm, Bullet Biker is amongst the army of bounty hunters looking to cash in on the reward. He and the rest are foiled by Hawkeye, Mockingbird and Trick Shot.[4]

Equipment

The Bullet Biker's custom made motorcycle is equipped with weaponry that can fire ordinary bullets and missiles. The biker costume he wears conceals weaponry that can fire gas pellets and energy blasts.

D

Jacques Dernier

First appearance Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #21 (August 1965)
Created by Stan Lee and Dick Ayers
Aliases Frenchie

Jacques Dernier is a French Resistance freedom fighter during World War II in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Stan Lee and Dick Ayers, first appeared in Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #21 (August 1965) but was not named until Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #40 (March 1967).

Within the context of the Marvel universe, Jacques Dernier is a French resistance fighter who had several run-ins with Sergeant Fury's Howling Commandos throughout World War II. He was freed from Nazi capture by Fury and his squad[5] and later informed them that a Nazi spy had infiltrated their ranks as a nurse.[6]

In other media

The character of Jacques Dernier has been adapted for the film Captain America: The First Avenger where he was portrayed by actor Bruno Ricci. Here he was a member of the Howling Commandos.

Dittomaster

First appearance Damage Control vol. 2, #4 (February 1990)
Created by Dwayne McDuffie and Ernie Colón
Aliases Shapeshifting

Dittomaster is a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Dwayne McDuffie and Ernie Colón, only appeared in Damage Control vol. 2, #4 (February 1990).

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Dittomaster impersonates Henry Peter Gyrich of the Commission on Superhuman Activities in an attempt to force Anne Marie Hoag of Damage Control to sign documents supporting the Superhero Registration Act during the "Acts of Vengeance" story arc.[7]

E

Elfqueen

First appearance The Avengers #212 (October 1981)
Created by Jim Shooter and Alan Kupperberg
Aliases Linnea

Elfqueen is a sorceress in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Shooter and Alan Kupperberg, first appeared in The Avengers #212 (October 1981).

With in the context of the Marvel universe, The Elfqueen, Linnea, and her lover Gorn of Valusia settled in the area that would eventually become the state of Virginia. She uses her magic to hide their existence and extend their lives. After millennia of this existence, Gorn grows bored with the isolation and the pair return to civilization. Unprepared for the modern world, Gorn comes into conflict with the locals and the police. When the Elfqueen intervenes and kills the officers, he slaps her. Hurt and angry, she leaves him in the city.

Gorn's exploration of the city ends with his death when he charges a group of police officers with a drawn sword. This drives the Elfqueen into a rage and she begins to use her magic to take vengeance on the city. The Avengers arrive and unsuccessfully physically confront her. Captain America begins to talk her out of the conflict but is interrupted by Yellowjacket firing on her and reigniting the fight. When Captain America is able to convince her that he is a man of peace, she agrees to leave in peace.

Abraham Erskine

First appearance Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941)
Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
Aliases Josef Reinstein[8]

Abraham Erskine is a scientist during World War II in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, first appeared in Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941) as Josef Reinstein. The name Abraham Erskine would not be applied to the character until decades later.[9]

Within the context of the Marvel universe, Abraham Erskine is a German biochemist and physicist who had spent much of his early life studying the human species. During this time he develops a diet and exercise program along with a serum and "vita-rays" which would transform an ordinary person into a "super soldier".[10][11][12] Horrified when he witnesses Adolf Hitler and Baron Zemo test a "death ray" on a human subject, he contacts the United States to defect from Nazi Germany.[13] After the United States Army gets him out of Germany and fakes his death, he takes the alias "Josef Reinstein".[9][14]

He recreates the Super Soldier Serum for Project: Rebirth for the U.S. Army. He oversees and administers the treatment to Steve Rogers before several U.S. Army officers and government officials. Moments after Rogers transformation, Erskine is assassinated by Heinz Kruger.[10]

Other versions

Abraham Erskine was adapted along with the origin of Captain America for the story featured in Ultimate Origins #2 (Sept. 2008).

In other media

The character of Abraham Erskine has been adapted for appearances in two animated television shows, The Marvel Super Heroes and The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes.

The character has also been adapted for the film Captain America: The First Avenger where he was portrayed by actor Stanley Tucci.[15] While he is still a German defector, the movie adds the additional twist that, before defecting, he actually tested the serum in Germany on the man who would become the Red Skull (albeit unwillingly).

Christine Everhart

First appearance Iron Man vol 3, #75 (February 2004)
Created by John Jackson Miller and Jorge Lucas

Christine Everhart is a reporter in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by John Jackson Miller and Jorge Lucas, first appeared in Iron Man vol. 3, #75 (February 2004).

With in the context of the Marvel universe, Christine Everhart works for the Daily Bugle as an investigative reporter. As part of her job, she provides the Bugle with news coverage of Tony Stark's appearance before the senate.

In other media

The character of Christine Everhart was adapted for the films Iron Man and Iron Man 2 where she was portrayed by actress Leslie Bibb. In the films her employer is changed to the magazine Vanity Fair.

F

Carmilla Frost

First appearance Amazing Adventures vol 2, #21 (November 1973)
Created by Don McGregor and Herb Trimpe

Carmilla Frost is a freedom fighter and member of Killraven's Freemen in a post-apocalyptic alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Don McGregor and Herb Trimpe, first appeared in Amazing Adventures vol 2, #21 (November 1973) and continued to appear in most issues of the title through #39.

Within the stories, Carmilla Frost is born in 1994 in an alternate-future Earth designated Earth-691 by Marvel Comics. In 2001 she is taken with her father Andre to the Martians' Yankee Stadium Genetic and Clonal Complex. Andre is coerced to serve the Martians in performing cloning research by threats to harm child. In 2004 she begins assisting her father in his experiments, and eventually becomes an expert molecular biologist. By 2010 she becomes the youngest human designated as a Keeper by the Martians. However, in 2014 she refuses to conduct cloning experiments on other humans. Two years later, after a Martian Overlord slew Andre, she agrees to try to clone his corpse in an attempt to restore him to life. Her effort fail, instead producing the mutated creature Grok. In 2018 she helps Killraven escape from captivity from the Yankee Stadium Genetic and Clonal Complex and joins his Freemen.[volume & issue needed] In 2020 she learns that she is pregnant with the Freeman M'Shulla's child.[volume & issue needed]

She and her newborn son Skar are rescued by the cross-reality traveling Machine Man and Howard the Duck.[16]

Firefrost

First appearance Fantastic Four #229 (April 1981)
Created by Doug Moench and Bill Sienkiewicz

Firefrost, also known as Shareen, is an alien from the future of the Marvel Comics universe..

The character, created by Doug Moench and Bill Sienkiewicz, appeared in Fantastic Four #229-230 (April–May 1981).

Shareen was an alien from the far future, who, along with her lover Xanth, were pulled into the Black Hole at the site of the "Big Bang" that created the universe. Shareen died and was reborn as a being of "living light". Xanth was also reborn as the Ebon Seeker though he was driven insane, and traveled from planet to planet for eons, destroyed each world as he died, and then being reborn to continue the cycle.

The Ebon Seeker intercepted a transmission sent by Reed Richards and followed it to Earth to destroy it. The Fantastic Four tried to stop him, but their powers were useless against him. Firefrost, appeared to stop her lover from destroying the Earth, and managed to convince him to accompany her back to the Black Hole and become a creature of light like herself.[volume & issue needed]


K

Kaluu

First appearance Strange Tales #147 (August 1966)
Created by Denny O'Neill and Bill Everett

Kaluu is a sorcerer specializing in black magic and contemporary of the Ancient One in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Denny O'Neill and Bill Everett, first appeared in Strange Tales #147 (Aug 1966). He has appeared sporadically as an opponent to Doctor Strange.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Kaluu is born in the mystic city of Kamar-Taj over 500 years ago. When he is of age, he becomes a fellow student of the mystic arts of the Ancient One.

During these studies, Kaluu is approached by Varnae, the eldest of the true vampires. Varnae tells him about the tome of black magic known as the Darkhold.[volume & issue needed] After this meeting, Kaluu begins to use his sorcery to influence the minds of the people of Kamar-Taj. This results in them crowning him king after he and the Ancient One eliminated disease, poverty, and suffering from the city through magic. Kaluu moves ont to his next goal by organizing the men of Kamar-Taj into an army of conquest and mystically paralyzing the Ancient One.

After the conquest of a neighboring city, Kamar-Taj begins to fall into decadence. The paralyzed Ancient One mentally calls upon mystical forces to defeat Kaluu. Lacking mastery of the mystic arts, the forces he summons created a pestilence that almost wipes out the entire population of Kamar-Taj as well as forcing Kaluu to flee to the dimension of Raggador.[17]

Kaluu emerges from Raggador five centuries latter and attempts to steal the Book of the Vishanti. He is defeated by Doctor Strange and hurled into another dimension in suspended animation.[18][19]

Kaluu is later freed by the forces unleashed by Doctor Strange's battle with Urthona. Returning from his exile, Kaluu becomes a business man, amassing great wealth. He later forms an alliance with Strange and tutors him in black magic to battle Shuma-Gorath and various other ancient evils.[20] After the battles are won, he casts a spell to remove the physical and astral pollution from Strange caused by the use of black magic.[21]

Powers and abilities

Kaluu has the ability to manipulate magical forces for a vast number of effects, including levitation, teleportation, energy projection, conjuration of small physical objects, physical transformation of objects, and the tapping of extra-dimensional energy by invoking entities or objects of power existing in dimensions tangential to Earth's through the recitation of spells. He has used this skill to render himself immortal. He also has the powers of mesmerism, thought-casting, illusion-casting, and astral projection.

Krugarr

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1 (1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Species Lem
Abilities Manipulation of magic

Krugarr is a sorcerer from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1 (1991) as the Sorcerer Supreme of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691.

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Doctor Strange finds Krugarr on Lem in the 22nd century. Strange, having replaced the Ancient One, offers to take him on as an apprentice. He agrees, succeeding Strange as the Sorcerer Supreme.

Later Kurgarr encounters the Guardians of the Galaxy and becomes involved with some of their adventures. This includes temporarily taking Talon on as an appretice[volume & issue needed] and healing Major Victory from a head would that establishes a long lasting psychic link between the two.[volume & issue needed]

His last interaction with the team involves the world controlled by the entity Mainframe. When contacted by Martinex he regretfully declines to directly help due to a crisis growing in the Dark Dimensions. He does telepathically send Hollywood who joins with several other powerful superheros to save the survivors of Mainframe's world. This spurs the creation of the Galactic Guardians.[volume & issue needed]

Heinz Kruger

First appearance Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941)
Created by Jack Kirby and Joe Simon

Heinz Kruger is a German spy during World War II in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jack Kirby and Joe Simon, first appeared in Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941) but is not named until Captain America #109 (January 1969).

Within the context of the Marvel universe, Heinz Kruger is a Gestapo agent working for the Nazi party during World War II tasked with investigating Abraham Erskine and the American supersoldier experiment. He is able to infiltrate the project and pass the formula to his superiors. He attends the experiment on Steve Rogers, crashing through the viewing window and assassinating Erskine after the Super Soldier Serum is administered. He struggles with Rogers before accidentally grasping an electrical wire and being electrocuted.[10]

In other media

The character of Heinz Kruger has been adapted for the film Captain America: The First Avenger, where he is portrayed by actor Richard Armitage. Similar to the comic counterpart, he assassinates Dr. Erskine shortly after the Super Soldier Serum is administered, and also stole a copy of the perfected serum. However, he is pursued and eventually captured by Rogers. Unlike the comic counterpart, however, he deliberately kills himself with a cyanide pill to avoid capture. In addition, he is instead an agent of HYDRA, which in the film is the Nazi's "Deep Science division" led by Johann Schmidt/The Red Skull.

M

Marduk Kurios

First appearance Marvel Spotlight #13 (January 1974)
Created by Gary Friedrich and Herb Trimpe
Species demon
Abilities Manipulation of magic

Marduk Kurios is a demon in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Gary Friedrich and Herb Trimpe, first appeared in Marvel Spotlight #13 (January 1974) and was identified as "Satan" in appearances until The Witches #3 (September 2004).[citation needed] He is also presented as the father of the characters Daimon Hellstrom and Satana.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Marduk Kurios is a high level demon and ruler of one realm of hell who has from time to time presented himself as "Satan" or "Lucifer".

In pre-history Marduk Kurios is noted for repelling an invasion of the N'Garai.[volume & issue needed] In later times, he became worshiped by the ancient Sumerians after his legions took part in a battle on Earth. This worship intrigues him and he keeps track of the mortal real for ceturies, finally focusing on a family of satanists name "Hellstrom".[volume & issue needed] Taking human form, he becomes part of this family, weds Victoria Wingate, and sires first his son Damion and then his daughter Satana.

Over time, Marduk Kurios sees that his son does not care for his demonic heritage and focuses on his more accepting daughter. While performing a ritual with Satana, Victoria stumbles upon them and is driven insane by his true nature. As a result, he commits his wife to an asylum where she spends the rest of her life and keeps a diary intended for her son when he is "old enough".[volume & issue needed]

Marduk Kurios finally takes Satana to his realm in hell, leaving Daimon in the care of servants on earth. He continues to interact with his offspring, offering Daimon his birth right,[volume & issue needed] testing Satana's loyalty.[volume & issue needed], and encountering the Defenders during Daimon's time with the team[22].

Eventually, Daimon learnes his father's true name and deposes him. Marduk Kurios, much reduced in power, tricks Andrew Kale into opening the Tome of Zhered-Na and releasing Hellphyr. He does this in order to hopes of reducing the number of magic users in the world and better his standing in the realm of magic. His plan is undone when Satana spurns his offer to join him and helps kill the Hellphyr.[volume & issue needed]

During the storyline "Chaos War", Marduk Kurios, as "The Devil Powered By All of Hell's Fire", is among the entities Amatsu-Mikaboshi defeats and adds to the ranks of his army of slave gods.[23]

Jim Morita

First appearance Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #38 (January 1967)
Created by Roy Thomas and Dick Ayers

Jim Morita is a Japanese-American soldier during World War II in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Roy Thomas and Dick Ayers, first appeared in Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #38 (January 1967).

Within the context of the Marvel universe, Jim Morita is a Nisei soldier whose squadron assisted Sergeant Fury's Howling Commandos on several missions. His squad was at one point captured and sent to a Nazi Prison Camp, but were broken out by the Commandos.[24]

In other media

The character of Jim Morita was adapted for the film Captain America: The First Avenger as a member of the Howling Commandos. The role was played by actor Kenneth Choi.

O

Old Skull

First appearance Amazing Adventures vol 2, #20 (September 1973)
Created by Marv Wolfman and Herb Trimpe

Old Skull is a freedom fighter and member of Killraven's Freemen in a post-apocalyptic alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Marv Wolfman and Herb Trimpe, first appeared in Amazing Adventures vol 2, #20 (September 1973) and continued to appear in most issues of the title through #39.

Within the stories, Old Skull is born in 1987 in an alternate-future Earth designated Earth-691 by Marvel Comics. In 2001 he is enslaved by the Martians and put to work as a laborer converting existing buildings into Martian bases. Eventually he is consigned to the gladiatorial arena and becomes a champion by 2010. He meets Killraven in the Madison Square Garden Arena in 2014. Eventually the pair escape from the Gladiatorial Institute, and Old Skull joins Killraven's Freemen.[volume & issue needed]

Much later, Old Skull is bitten by a zombie created when the cross-reality traveling Machine Man and Howard the Duck unleash a zombie infestation to drive the Martians from Earth. Killraven severs the arm to keep the infection from spreading.[16]

P

Petunia Grimm

First appearance (mentioned) Fantastic Four #25, (appears)Fantastic Four #238 (January, 1982) (January 1982)
Created by Stan Lee, John Byrne and Jim Salicrup

Petunia Grimm, a normal human, is the aunt of the Fantastic Four's Ben Grimm, the Thing. He frequently noted that he was "Aunt Petunia's favorite nephew", but the character did not appear until Fantastic Four #238.

Petunia was revealed to be Thing's aunt by marriage, marrying his father's brother, Jacob Grimm, who was much older than her, placing Petunia closer to Ben Grimm in age.

Petunia made few appearances thereafter, although she was murdered by The Marquis of Death to show Thing his power.

Chester Phillips

First appearance Tales of Suspense #63 (March 1965)
Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby

Chester Phillips is World War II general in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character first appeared in Tales of Suspense #63 (March 1965).

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, General Chester Phillips is one of the army officers overseeing subject selection for Project: Rebirth. He takes a personal interest in Steve Rogers as the best candidate for the first test.[25] Both he and Abraham Erskine refuse to allow General Maxfield Saunders to have Clinton McIntyre receive the first full treatment. When Saunders steals the serum and apparently kills McIntyre, Phillips has the body shipped away and Saunders arrested.[26]

In other media

The character of Chester Phillips has been adapted for appearances in two animated television shows, The Marvel Super Heroes and The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes.

The character has also been adapted for the film Captain America: The First Avenger where he is portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones.[27]

Phoenix (Giraud)

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #11 (April 1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Abilities Telekinesis, teleportation, access to the power of the Phoenix Force.
Aliases Giraud

Giraud is the Phoenix from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy #11 (April 1991) as host of the Phoenix Force of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691.

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Giraud is a human inhabitant of the planet of New Haven, a world colonized by mutants, that is doomed by an instability in its core. Starhawk of the Guardians of the Galaxy offers Giraud a way to save his people: Become host to the Phoenix Force. As Phoenix, he consumes the planet but uses the absorbed energy to teleport his people to safety.[volume & issue needed]

Giraud joins the Guardians for a time. When a deadly psychic virus nearly drives him insane, and he destroys several lifeless planets before the Phoenix Force helps him heal himself, he leaves the team.[volume & issue needed]

Giraud would later form the Galactic Guardians alongside other superheroes, after they gathered to combat an ancient viral threat corrupting Mainframe and a future version of Korvac.[volume & issue needed]

Powers and abilities

Giraud is a non-powered human bonded with the Phoenix Force. Because of this he is able to use telekinesis, fire flaming psychic force blasts, fly at high speeds, absorb virtually any form of energy to increase these abilities. He can also use it to teleport vast amounts of matter over immense distances by converting the matter into energy and then turning it back into matter at a desired location. It also allows him to fly through the vacuum of space without harm and to heal himself almost instantly if damaged. When he uses his powers, he is surrounded by an aura of psionic fire that takes the shape of a bird.

Proctor

First appearance The Avengers #344 (February 1992)
Created by Bob Harras and Steve Epting
Aliases Dane Whitman[citation needed]

Proctor is a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Bob Harras and Steve Epting, first appeared in The Avengers #344 (February 1992) as the counterpart of the Black Knight from the alternate reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-374.[citation needed]

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Proctor is the leader of the dimension crossing "Gatherers", a group he creates as a result of his lifemate, that Earth's Sersi, spurning him. His goal in creating the team is to extract vengeance by killing all versions of Sersi across Marvel's multiverse. His mission brings him to the Avenger's Earth where he tries to win Magdalene's love[28] and infiltrate the Avengers.[29] At the end of his confrontation with the Avengers, he is impaled by the Ebony Blade but manages to escape.[30]

Powers and abilities

Proctor possesses superhuman strength, speed, stamina, durability, agility, and reflexes, can project destructive energy beams from his eyes, telepathy, and the psionic ability to manipulate the chemical composition of the human brain.

Protégé

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #15 (August 1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Abilities Duplication of another entities' powers

Protégé is a cosmic entity from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy #15 (August 1991) as the child-like ruler of the Universal Church of Truth of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691. He is depicted as a superhuman of nearly unlimited potential, with the ability to duplicate not only super-powers, but also the skills of others simply by observing the ability being used; thus, he could acquire the psychokinetic powers of the Guardian Vance Astro as easily as he could the marksmanship ability of Astro's teammate Nikki, by watching them in combat.

Within the context of the Marvel Comics universe, Protégé is the deity and leader of Universal Church of Truth to which Replica, a member of the Guardian of the Galaxy, belongs. In order to save the lives of her teammates, she offers herself as a playmate to Protégé who is accompanied by Malevolence.[31]

Later, Protégé uses its abilities to duplicate the powers of the Living Tribunal, nearly usurping its place in Marvel's cosmology.[32] When attempts to defeat Protégé fail, The Living Tribunal states that any and all realities rest on Protégé's shoulders. And Protégé itself claims to have become the new One-Above-All.[33] Scathan the Approver, a Celestial, saves all realities by judging against Protégé. The Living Tribunal then absorbed Protégé into itself to prevent him from endangering all realities again.[34]

R

Rancor

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #8 (January 1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Species Mutant
Abilities Accelerated healing factor, immunity to poison, superhuman sensory acuity, extendable sharpened claw-like fingernails.

Rancor is a mutant from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy #8 (January 1991) as the leader of a world settled by mutants of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691.

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Rancor is the leader of New Haven and claims to be a direct descendant of Wolverine. She initially crosses paths with the Guardians of the Galaxy when she is trying to eliminate the Resistance.[35]

She later steals one of Wolverine's claws from a Shi'ar museum[36] as part of a plan to find her ancestor. In the course of her quest, she loses possession of the claw during a confrontation with Talon.[37] She regains the claw when she is recruited by Doctor Doom.[38] She eventually turns against Doom and discovers he is in possession of Wolverine's skeleton.[39] The confrontation results in her being severely wounded and rescued by the Guardians of the Galaxy.[40]

Replica

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #9 (February 1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Species Skrull
Abilities Shapeshifting, limited ability to mimic the powers of others

Replica is a Skrull from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe and a member of the Guardians of the Galaxy and Galactic Guardians.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy #9 (February 1991) as an inhabitant of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691.

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Replica is a devout member of the Universal Church of Truth who lives in disguise on the planet New Haven under the rule of Rancor. When the Guardians of the Galaxy arrive, she joins then and the Resistance against Ranco.[41] When the Guardians leave New Haven, she stows away on their ship as an insect only to be discovered by Yondu.[42] Over time she assists the Guardians against a Stark saboteur, the Spirit of Vengeance, and the Grand Inquisitor. She also reveals that she is a member of the Universal Church of Truth and a Skrull as she officially joins the Guardians.[43] Later, in order to save the lives of the Guardians, she gives herself as a playmate to her god, Protégé.[31]

She uses her position with Protégé to help the Guardians, but comes into conflict with Protégé's other companion, a demonic-looking woman named Malevolence. When she receives a call for aid from Martinex, she dodges the attentions of both Protégé and Malevolence to answer this call, though ultimately Protégé lets her go.[44] Despite this, she still needs to be rescued from a Universal Church ship by Firelord. Their rescue of Martinex' planet results in the formation of the Galactic Guardians.[45]

Nathaniel Richards

First appearance Fantastic Four #272 (November 1984)
Created by John Byrne
Abilities Scientific genius and inventor

Nathaniel Richards is a scientific genius and time traveler in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by John Byrne, first appeared in Fantastic Four #272 (November 1984) as the long absent father of Reed Richards. Later stories have implied the character is the father of Huntara and Kristoff Vernard, and ancestor of Kang the Conqueror.

With in the context of the Marvel Universe, Nathaniel Richards is scientific genius, inventor of the "time platform", and, during the 1950s, a member of S.H.I.E.L.D..[46] At some point after the birth of his son Reed, he begins to travel in time and alternate realities, leaving his son and wife Evelyn behind in his native time and reality. In one of the alternate realities he meets, marries, and has a son with a woman named Cassandra.

He has returned to his native time on a number occasions to interact with his first son, Reed, though always to further his own goals. The acts he has committed involving these returns include: impersonating Doctor Doom;[volume & issue needed] kidnapping and raising his grandson Franklin and replacing him with an aged Psi-Lord version;[volume & issue needed] working with Cable and X-Force to secure Doom's version of the time platform; and joining the Future Foundation.[47]

Rintrah

First appearance Doctor Strange #80 (December 1986)
Created by Peter B. Gillis and Chris Warner
Species R'Vaalian
Abilities Manipulation of magic, immense strength

Rintrah is an other-dimensional mystic in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Peter B. Gillis and Chris Warner, first appeared in Doctor Strange #80 (December 1986). He was depicted as a green furred minotaur during the stories he appeared in.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Rintrah comes from an other-dimensional planet called R'Vaal. There, because of his sensitivity to occult forces and his potential to become a skilled sorcerer, he is apprenticed to Enitharmon the Weaver. When Doctor Strange brings his Cloak of Levitation to Enitharmon for repair, the weaver sends Rintrah to return the restored cloak.[48] After delivering the cloak, Strange briefly, and with permission, possesses his body to fend off Urthona.[49] He remains with Strange for a short time before returning to his apprenticeship.[21]

Rintrah returns some time later to become Strange's apprentice.[50] He accompanies Strange on a number of adventures after this, progressing in his skils and his master's respect. In this he earns Strange's original blue Cloak of Levitation and the Amulet of Agamotto.[51] In his final adventure with Strange, he smashes the Tartessus Talisman and the resulting energy decimates his body.[52] Strange later commits his apprentice's remains to another dimension for temporary safekeeping.[53]

Ripjak

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #54 (November 1994)
Created by Michael Gallagher and Kevin West
Species Martian

Ripjak is a Martian from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Michael Gallagher and Kevin West, first appeared in Guardians of the Galaxy #54 (November 1994) as a resident of the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691.

With in context of the Marvel Universe, Ripjak is a Martian (from the novel The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells) encased in and artificial exoskeleton and embued with a transfusion of Spider-Man's blood. The media dubs him the "Interplanetary Serial Killer" and he first encounters the Guardians of the Galaxy as an adversary. It is later reveals that Ripjak is not the killer the media presented but rather an agent of mercy. The planets he destroyed had been infected by the being known as Bubonicus, his actions were to prevent the contagions from spreading and end the suffering of those living there.[volume & issue needed]

Rl'nnd

First appearance Ms. Marvel (vol. 2) #25 (May 2008)
Created by Brian Reed and Adriana Melo
Species Skrull
Abilities Shapeshifting abd duplication of various X-Men's powers.

Rl'nnd is a Skrull invader the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Brian Reed and Adriana Melo, first appeared in Ms. Marvel (vol. 2) #25 (May 2008) as a Super-Skrull agent. Prior to this a character with a similar visual depiction and powers was featured in New Avengers: Illuminati #5 (January 2008), also written by Brian Reed. He has stated that the two characters are not the same.[54]

With in context of the Marvel Universe, Rl'nnd is an advance agent of the Skrulls sent to eliminate a Kree agent using the alias William Wagner. In preparation, Rl'nnd has been augmented as a Super-Skrull and possesses the powers of a number of the X-Men. His missions changes when another Skrull posing as Ms. Marvel deals with Wagner.[55] He infiltrates a S.H.I.E.L.D. Minicarrier to interrogate Ms. Marvel. This results in a fight between the two when ends in his death when Ms. Marvel's team results to lethal force.[56]

Powers and abilities

Rl'nnd possesses the natural shapeshifting abilities of a Skrull. These have been augmented to allow him to mimic the abilities of members of the X-Men. These include: the organic steel skin, strength, and durability of Colossus; the acute senses and retractable claws of Wolverine; teleportation of Nightcrawler; and the optic blast of Cyclops.

Bernie Rosenthal

First appearance Captain America Vol. 1 #248 (August 1980){{Verify source}}

Bernie Rosenthal is a fictional comic book character appearing in books published by Marvel Comics. She is the ex-girlfriend of Captain America.

Bernie resided in New York City and was a glass blower. She later went to law school, graduated, and became a lawyer. At one time Bernie is kidnapped by the excessively moralistic right-wing terrorist group The Watchdogs. Captain America and his ally U.S. Agent worked together to rescue her. She first appeared in Captain America volume 1 #248 (August 1980).

Other versions

In the Earth X version, Bernie Rosenthal was killed by the Red Skull. The Mainstream version of Bernie has recently reappeared to defend Bucky Barnes as he is tried for his Winter Soldier crimes.

In other media

In the 1990 low budget film Captain America, a similar character named Bernice "Bernie" Stewart played by Kim Gillingham appears. She's a 1940s wartime girlfriend of Steve Rogers. After he goes missing after sabotaging the Red Skull, she assumes he is dead. 50 years later she is married and has a daughter Sharon. Bernie is later killed by the Skull's daughter, who comes looking for Rogers in her home.

S

M'Shulla Scott

First appearance Amazing Adventures vol 2, #19 (July 1973)
Created by Gerry Conway and Howard Chaykin
Aliases Bloodarrow

M'Shulla Scott is a freedom fighter and member of Killraven's Freemen in a post-apocalyptic alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Gerry Conway and Howard Chaykin, first appeared in Amazing Adventures vol 2, #19 (July 1973) and continued to appear in most issues of the title through #39.

Within the stories, M'Shulla Scott is born in 1997 in an alternate-future Earth designated Earth-691 by Marvel Comics. His mother, Hortense Scott, organizes the Fighters for Human Dignity, the first civilian resistance against the Martians. In 2005 he is captured and sent to the Martians' gladiatorial training pens. In 2010 he meets Killraven. After escaping from the Martians in 2015 he joins Killraven's Freemen.[volume & issue needed]

Spirit of Vengeance

First appearance Guardians of the Galaxy #12 (May 1991)
Created by Jim Valentino
Species Sarkaian
Aliases Wileaydus Autolycus

Spirit of Vengeance is the Ghost Rider from an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe and member of the Galactic Guardians.

The character, created by Jim Valentino, first appeared as Wileaydus Autolycus in Guardians of the Galaxy #12 (May 1991) as the inheritor of the Ghost Rider mantle in the alternate timeline/reality Marvel Comics designated as Earth-691. The first appearance of the Spirit of Vengeance aspect of the character was in the following issue, Guardians of the Galaxy #13 (June 1991).

Within the context of the Marvel Comics universe, Wileaydus Autolycus is from the planet Sarka, Tilnast system, a priest of an offshoot of the Universal Church of Truth, and a religious zealot. He first encounters the Guardians of the Galaxy while they are responding to a destress call from Firelord in the Tilnast system.[57] Mistaking the ship as one carrying Black Knights of Truth as reinforcements for the Universal Church of Truth, he under goes his first transformation into the Spirit of Vengeance and blindly attacks the Guardians.[58] Realizing his error, he sets out to “atone for this transgression“ by charging into the heart of the fleet to buy the Guardians time to escape. Instead the Guardians are captured and brought before the Grand Inquisitor of the Universal Church of Truth on Sarka. The Spirit of Vengeance, with help from Replica, enables the Guardians escape. Before leaving, Vance Astro asks him to join them and consider changing his methods. He declines saying he preferred to complete his work on Sarka but that he would think on it as he kills the Grand Inquisitor.[43]

Later he is among those that respond to Martinex' call for help. He helps the gathered heroes save Martinex' homeworld and becomes one of the founding members of the Galactic Guardians.[45]

Powers and abilities

The Spirit of Vengeance has the mystic ability to transform into a being with superhuman strength, stamina, and durability, with a head resembling a flaming skull. He can project fire-like mystical energy called either "soulfire" or "hellfire" for various effects. He can create his "Death-Cycle", a flying motorcycle-like vehicle created from the Fires of Kauri[58] and capable of traversing airless space. The Spirit of Vengeance can also fire spike projectiles from his forearms.

Fabian Stankowicz

First appearance The Avengers #217 (March 1982)
Created by Jim Shooter and Bob Hall

Fabian Stankowicz is a supervillain used for comic relief in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Shooter, Bob Hall, and Dan Green, first appeared The Avengers #217 (March 1982).

Within the context of the Marvel Comics universe, Fabian Stankowicz is a lottery winner and engineer who uses his winnings to finance his creation of various powered armors. He sets out to use the armor to gain notoriety as a supervillain[59] and crosses paths with the Avengers a number of times.

After his release from prison, Captain America recruits Stankowicz as the Avengers on-site inventor and technical support.[60]

Franklin Storm

First appearance Fantastic Four #31 (October 1964)
Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby

Franklin Storm is a surgeon in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, first appeared Fantastic Four #31 (October 1964) as the estranged father of Susan and Johnny Storm.

Within the context of the Marvel Comics universe, Franklin Storm is an accomplished surgeon who was unable to save the life of his wife after an automobile accident. Blaming himself for her death, he gives up his career and turns to gambling, eventually borrowing money from a loan shark. When he is unable to pay, the loan shark sends a thug to threaten him and his children. Storm struggles with the thug, who accidentally shoots himself. As a result, Storm is convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 20 years in prison. He requests that Susan not visit him and that she tell Johnny that he is dead.

When Susan is seriously injured escaping from the Mole Man's lair, Storm, who had escaped from prison, comes out of hiding to operate on her, saving her life. After the operation, he is returned to prison where he is abducted by the Skrulls.[61] The Super-Skrull impersonates him in a plot to demoralize the Fantastic Four. When Reed Richards recognizes the impostor and forces the Skrulls to exchange Storm for their, Morrat suggests a new plan. The Skrulls attach a concussive energy beam projector, set to go off in the presence of the Fantastic Four, to Storm's chest. When he appears, he warns the heroes to stay away and rolls over on the floor, taking the full force of the fatal blast on himself.[62]

Much later, Susan, in honor of his memory and sacrifice, names her son Franklin after him.[63]

Other versions

The character was adapted by Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Millar, and Adam Kubert for Marvel Comics' Ultimate Marvel imprint in Ultimate Fantastic Four #1 (February 2004) and would appear as a somewhat regular character in that series.

With in the context of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, Franklin Storm is a scientist originally working on the "super soldier" project and subsequently "poached" to lead the Baxter Building project.[64] In that role he removes Dr. Molhevic for attempting to create biological life[volume & issue needed] and later becomes mentor to and supervisor of the Fantastic Four. During the storyline "Ultimatum" he is killed by the tidal wave that tares through Manhattan.[65]

In other media

The character of Franklin Storm was adapted for an appearance in the episode "Behold, A Distant Star" of the 1994 animated series Fantastic Four. For the episode the character was voiced by Richard McGonagle.[citation needed]

T

Terminus

First appearance Fantastic Four #269 (August 1984)
Created by John Byrne
Species Fonabi

Terminus is an extraterrestrial supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by John Byrne, first appeared Fantastic Four #269 (August 1984).

Within the context of the Marvel Comics universe, Terminus is a destroyer of worlds first encountered by Mister Fantastic and She-Hulk while they investigated a powerful beam from outer space. The beam is Terminus claiming the Earth as his. Mister Fantastic defeats him with a device that drives him hundreds of miles into the crust of the planet.[66][67]

The character reappears in a handful of stories over the following years, each with contradictory elements regarding it. "The Terminus Factor" published across five annuals during 1990 clarified Terminus' origin story, casting it as a "planetary virus" that infects a world, co-opting the planet's lifeforms, and "birthing" a new Terminus.

In other media

The character of Terminus was adapted for the episode "Scavenger Hunt" of the animated series Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes and voiced by Lee Tockar.[citation needed]

Y

Yandroth

First appearance Strange Tales #164 (January 1968)
Created by Jim Lawrence and Dan Adkins
Species Yannian

Yandroth is an other dimensional technomancer in the Marvel Comics universe.

The character, created by Jim Lawrence and Dan Adkins, first appeared in Strange Tales #164 (January 1968). He has appeared sporadically as an opponent to Doctor Strange.

Within the context of the Marvel Universe, Yandroth is the "Scientist Supreme" of the other dimensional planet Yann, and a would-be-conqueror who encounters and challenges Doctor Strange, as a counterpart to the latter's title of Sorcerer Supreme.[68] Doctor Strange defeats Yandroth, sending him to fall forever through the Dimension of Dreams.[69]

During his fall, Yandroth gains a degree of magical knowledge including how to gain more power by destroying a world. Returning to Earth, he constructs the "Omegatron". When his physical body is killed in a traffic accident, his spirit inhabits and activates the Omegatron. In this state he battles Doctor Strange, Namor, and the Hulk, the Defenders. Strange places Yandroth under a time displacement spell to defeat him.[70]

When the Omegatron is released from the spell it is physically destroyed by the Defenders and Namorita,[71] but Yandroth's spirit possesses a young female chemist. Later he uses this form to telepathically attack the heroes only to be defeated again.[72] He is able to possess another host and sets in motion a plan to destroy the world. The original Defenders reform and stand against him. Learning that he is utilizing the captured form of Gaea to summon the monsters, they take the fight to him, disabling the spell needed to destroy the world, freeing Gaea, and destroying Yandroth. With his dying breath he curses the four who can barely stand one another so that they must come and work together in times of a severe crisis.[73] This curse later revives Yandroth and gives him control over the four Defenders. He uses this in an attempt to destroy Yann.[74]

He later reappears as a businessman assisted by a floating head called "Recorder". He attempts to manipulate events to gain god-level powers. This involves a later version of the Defenders gathered by Nighthawk and results in Yandroth disappearing when defeated.[75]

Powers and abilities

Yandroth has the ability to manipulate the forces of magic for a number of effects. As a spirit, he has the ability to possess the mind of any living human with similar brain patterns.

See also

References

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