Sicilian Defence, Chekhover Variation

Sicilian Defence, Chekhover Variation
Solid white.svg a b c d e f g h Solid white.svg
8  black rook  black knight  black bishop  black queen  black king  black bishop  black knight  black rook 8
7  black pawn  black pawn  black king  black king  black pawn  black pawn  black pawn  black pawn 7
6  black king  black king  black king  black pawn  black king  black king  black king  black king 6
5  black king  black king  black king  black king  black king  black king  black king  black king 5
4  black king  black king  black king  white queen  white pawn  black king  black king  black king 4
3  black king  black king  black king  black king  black king  white knight  black king  black king 3
2  white pawn  white pawn  white pawn  black king  black king  white pawn  white pawn  white pawn 2
1  white rook  white knight  white bishop  black king  white king  white bishop  black king  white rook 1
Solid white.svg a b c d e f g h Solid white.svg
Moves 1.e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4
ECO B53
Named after Vitaly Chekhover
Parent Open Sicilian
Synonym(s) Szily Variation, Hungarian Variation
Chessgames.com opening explorer

The Sicilian Chekhover Variation is a chess opening named after Vitaly Chekhover, from Chekhover–Lisitsin, Leningrad 1938.[1] It is also sometimes called the Szily or Hungarian Variation.[1] Although the Chekhover Variation is rarely played in grandmaster games, it is actually not uncommon among amateurs.[2] On move four White ignores the standard opening advice to not move the queen out early in the game (as it may become a target in the center). The Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings assigns code B53 to this variation.[3]

Responses for Black

Black's main response to the Chekhover Variation is the obvious looking 4...Nc6 attacking White's queen, however, there are many more to choose from.

  • 4...Nc6 - The most popular response
    • 5. Bb5 - Pinning the knight: 5...Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6
    • 5. Qa4?! - Avoiding an exchange and keeping the light squared bishop
  • 4...a6 - Preventing a future pin: 5. c4 Nc6 6. Qd1
  • 4...Bd7 - Preparing for 5...Nc6
  • 4...Nf6 - Avoiding exchanges and continuing development

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Hooper, David; Whyld, Kenneth (1992), The Oxford Companion to Chess (2 ed.), Oxford University Press, p. 75, ISBN 0-19-280049-3 
  2. ^ The Chekhover Variation chessgames.com Chess Opening Explorer
  3. ^ Sicilian ECO: B53

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