Soup

A homemade chicken noodle soup with bread

Soup is a generally warm food that is made by combining ingredients such as meat and vegetables with stock, juice, water, or another liquid. Hot soups are additionally characterized by boiling solid ingredients in liquids in a pot until the flavors are extracted, forming a broth. Traditionally, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, lentils, flour, and grains.

Soups are similar to stews, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two; however, soups generally have more liquid than stews.[1]

Contents

Commercial soup products

File:Packets of Soup.jpg
Packets of soup

Commercial soup became popular with the invention of canning in the 19th century, and today a great variety of canned and dried soups are on the market.

Canned soup

Dr. John T. Dorrance, a chemist with the Campbell Soup Company, invented condensed soup in 1897.[2] Today, Campbell's Tomato, Cream of Mushroom, and Chicken Noodle Soup are three of the most popular soups in America. Americans consume approximately 2.5 billion bowls of these three soups alone each year.[2] Canned Italian-style soups, such as minestrone or Italian wedding, are also popular, and are sold by Progresso and other brands.

Canned soup can be condensed, in which case it is prepared by adding water (or sometimes milk), or it can be "ready-to-eat," meaning that no additional liquid is needed before eating. Canned soup (condensed with liquid added, or "ready-to-eat") can be prepared by heating in a pan, on the stovetop or in the microwave. Such soups can be used as a base for homemade soups, with the consumer adding anything from a few vegetables to eggs, vegetables, cream or pasta.

Condensing soup allows soup to be packaged into a smaller can and sold at a lower price than other canned soups. The soup is usually doubled in volume by adding a "can full" of water or milk (about 10 ounces).

Since the 1990s, the canned soup market has burgeoned with soups marketed as "ready-to-eat," which require no additional liquid to prepare. Microwaveable bowls have expanded the ready-to-eat canned soup market even more, offering convenience (especially in workplaces) and are popular lunch items.

Dried soup

Asian-style soup mixes containing ramen noodles are marketed by Western and Asian manufacturers as an inexpensive instant meal, requiring only hot water for preparation.[3]

In terms of Western-style cuisine, vegetable, chicken base, potato, pasta and cheese soups are also available in dry mix form, ready to be served by adding hot water and sometimes fresh ingredients such as meat or vegetables.

Nutritional developments

  • Salt - In response to concern over the health effects of excessive salt intake, some soup manufacturers have introduced reduced-salt versions of popular soups.[4]
  • Trans fat - Concern over coronary heart disease has led some soup manufacturers to eliminate trans fats from their soups.[citation needed]

Types of soup

Soup Course

Dessert soups

Red bean soup dessert

Fruit soups

Fruit soups are served warm or cold depending on the recipe. Many recipes are for cold soups served when fruit is in season during hot weather. Some, like Norwegian fruktsuppe, may be served warm and rely on dried fruit, such as raisins and prunes and so could be made in any season. Fruit soups may include milk or cream, sweet or savoury dumplings, spices, or alcoholic beverages, such as brandy or champagne. Cherry soup is made with table wine and/or port. Starch, particularly potato starch, is used to thicken fruit soups, to make kisel.

Cold and warm fruit soups are common in Scandinavian, Baltic and Eastern European cuisines, while hot fruit soups with meat appear in Middle Eastern, Central Asian and Chinese cuisines. Cold fruit soups include krentjebrij.

Fruit soups are uncommon or absent in the cuisines of the Americas, Africa and Western Europe. They are also not seen in Japan, Southeast Asia or Oceania.

Cold soups

Cold soups are a particular variation on the traditional soup, wherein the temperature when served is kept at or below room temperature. They may be sweet or savory. In summer, sweet cold soups can form part of a dessert tray. An example of a savory chilled soup is gazpacho, a chilled vegetable-based soup originating from Spain.

Asian soups

Authentic tom yum served in Bangkok, Thailand.
Chinese fish ball soup sold in Bukit Batok, Singapore

A feature of East Asian soups not normally found in Western cuisine is the use of tofu in soups. Many traditional East Asian soups are typically broths, clear soups, or starch thickened soups.

Traditional regional soups

Swiss soup
Vegetable beef barley soup
  • Halászlé (fisherman's soup), a very hot and spicy Hungarian river fish soup, is made with hot paprika.
  • Íslensk Kjötsúpa is a traditional Icelandic meat soup made with lamb and vegetables.
  • Kharchois a Georgian soup of lamb, rice, vegetables and a highly spiced boullion.
  • Lagman, a tradition in Uzbekistan, is made with pasta, vegetables, ground lamb and numerous spices.
  • Lan Sikik is a Thai soup made with noodles, dried fish and tomato extract.
  • Leek soup, a simple soup made from leeks, is popular in Wales during Saint David's Day.
  • Lentil soup is popular in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines.
  • London particular is a thick soup of pureed (dry or split) peas and ham from England; purportedly it is named after the thick fogs of 19th century London.
  • Magiritsa Soup made in Greece and Cyprus using lamb offal.
  • Maryland crab soup is made of vegetables, blue crab meat, and Old Bay Seasoning in a tomato base, from Maryland.
  • Menudo, a traditional Mexican soup, is with tripe (usually beef) and hominy.
  • Michigan bean soup has been a staple for over a hundred years in the U.S. Senate dining room.[5]
  • Minestrone is an Italian vegetable soup.
  • Miso soup is made from fish broth and fermented soy in Japan.
  • Mulligatawny is an Anglo-Indian curried soup.
  • Nässelsoppa (nettle soup), made with stinging nettles, and traditionally eaten with hard boiled egg halves, is considered a spring delicacy in Sweden.
  • Nkatenkwan is a heavily spiced soup from Ghana based on groundnut with meat, most often chicken, and vegetables added. It's generally eaten with fufu.
  • Noodle soup is the common name for a diverse collection of soups with varied ingredients, including (obviously) noodles.
  • Patsás is made with tripe in Greece.
A thick pea soup garnished with a tortilla accent
  • Peasants' Soup is a catch-all term for soup made by combining a diverse--and often eclectic--assortment of ingredients. Variations on peasants' soup are popular in Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Africa.
  • Philadelphia pepper pot soup, a Philadelphia specialty, is traditionally made with tripe.[6]
  • Phở is Vietnamese beef/chicken soup with scallions, welsh onion, cherred ginger, wild coriander (Eryngium foetidum), basil, cinnamon, star anise, clove and black cardamom.
  • Psarosoupa, a Greek fish soup, is made in various versions with a variety of fish types.
  • Revithia is a Greek chickpea soup.
  • Sancocho is chicken soup with vegetables in Latin America.
  • Scotch broth is made from mutton or lamb, barley and root vegetables.
  • Shchav, a sorrel soup in Polish, Russian and Yiddish cuisines, is sour from the sorrel.
  • She-crab soup, from Charleston, South Carolina, is a creamy soup made with blue crab meat and crab roe.
  • Sinigang, from the Philippines, is a clear sour soup made from tamarind paste and meat, fish, or vegetables.
  • Snert (erwtensoep), a thick pea soup, is eaten in the Netherlands as a winter dish, and is traditionally served with sliced sausage.
  • Solyanka is another cabbage soup from Russia.
  • Sopa da Pedra, is a rich traditional Portuguese soup with lots of ingredients.
  • Soto, a traditional Indonesian soup made with turmeric, galangal, etc., usually contains either beef or chicken.
  • Split peas soup, a thick soup made in the Caribbean from split peas (chickpeas or garbanzos), usually includes "ground provision" vegetable staples and some type of meat.
  • Tarator is a Bulgarian cold soup made from yogurt and cucumbers.
  • Tomato soup comes in several varieties, with tomatoes in common.
  • Tom yumis the name for two similar hot and sour soups with fragrant herbs from Laos and Thailand.
  • Tarhana soup, from Persian cuisine is made with fermented grains and yoghurt.
  • " Trahanas" is a variation of the above soup using chicken and Halloumi Cheese
  • Vichyssoise, a French-style soup invented by a French chef at the Ritz Hotel in New York City, is a cold purée of potatoes, leeks, and cream.
  • Waterzooi is a Belgian fish soup.
  • Yukgaejang, a Korean spicy beef soup, also includes vegetables.
  • Żurek, a Polish sour rye soup with sausages, is often served in a bowl made of bread.

Soup as a figure of speech

Mirepoix consists of carrot, onion and celery and is often used for soup stocks and soups

In the English language, the word "soup" has developed several uses in phrase.

  • Alphabet soup, a term often used to describe a large number of acronyms used by an administration, has its roots in a common tomato-based soup containing pasta shaped in the letters of the alphabet.
  • Primordial soup is a term used to describe the organic mixture leading to the development of life.
  • A soup kitchen is a place that serves prepared food of any kind to the homeless.
  • Pea soup describes a thick or dense fog.
  • "Soup legs" is an informal or slang term used by athletes to describe fatigue or exhaustion.
  • "Stone soup" is a popular children's fable.
  • Duck soup is a term to describe a task that is particularly easy.
  • Word soup refers to any collection of words that is ostensibly incomprehensible.
  • Tag soup further refers to poorly coded HTML.
  • Soup Fire! can be used an expression of surprise.
  • Soupe du jour is French for "soup of the day." Sometimes used as a metaphor for anything currently trendy or fashionable.
  • "Soup to nuts" is an American English idiom conveying the meaning "from beginning to end" (see: full course dinner).
  • "Soup's on!" or "Soup's up!" is a common phrase used to say, "Dinner's ready."
  • Soup Sandwich is a denigrative U.S. military slang term, typically used to admonish a trooper for poor work or shoddy appearance. The term comes from the concept that a sandwich made out of soup would be a sloppy mess.
  • To soup something up is to improve it, or increase its power (most often used of cars, aeroplanes, and the like)- possibly from "supercharge".

In popular culture

See also

References

Romanian potato soup.

External links

  • Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food (2002). New York: Free Press ISBN 0-7432-2644-5
  • Larousse Gastronomique, Jennifer Harvey Lang, ed. American Edition (1988). New York: Crown Publishers ISBN 0-609-60971-8
  • Morton, Mark. Cupboard Love: A Dictionary of Culinary Curiosities (2004). Toronto: Insomniac Press ISBN 1-894663-66-7

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Soup — Soup, n. [F. soupe, OF. sope, supe, soupe, perhaps originally, a piece of bread; probably of Teutonic origin; cf. D. sop sop, G. suppe soup. See {Sop} something dipped in a liquid, and cf. {Supper}.] A liquid food of many kinds, usually made by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soup — [so͞op] n. [Fr soupe < OFr, soup: see SUP2] 1. a liquid food, with or without solid particles, made by cooking meat, vegetables, fish, etc. in water, milk, or the like 2. Slang a heavy fog ☆ 3. Slang nitroglycerin ☆ from soup to nuts Informal… …   English World dictionary

  • Soup.io — Soup  Ne doit pas être confondu avec soupe. Soup est une plate forme de microblogage. Elle est concurrente de Twitter (leader du marché). Soup se distingue par la diversité de types de billets publiables : billet textuel, lien… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Soup — Álbum de Blind Melon Publicación 2 de octubre de 1995 Grabación Noviembre 1994 Enero 1995 Género(s) Rock alternativo Duración 46:04 …   Wikipedia Español

  • soup — ► NOUN ▪ a savoury liquid dish made by boiling meat, fish, or vegetables in stock or water. ► VERB (soup up) informal 1) increase the power and efficiency of (an engine). 2) make more elaborate or impressive. ● in the soup Cf. ↑in the soup …   English terms dictionary

  • soup|y — «SOO pee», adjective, soup|i|er, soup|i|est. like soup in consistency or appearance: »The weather was soupy and visibility was reduced (New Yorker) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To sup or swallow. [Obs.] Wyclif. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To breathe out. [Obs.] amden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Soup — Soup, v. t. To sweep. See {Sweep}, and {Swoop}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • soup up — (something) to make something more powerful. They had to soup up the air conditioning to keep her computers from overheating in the summer. Usage notes: usually used to describe an improvement to a car or other machine …   New idioms dictionary

  • soup — soup; soup·çon; …   English syllables

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