Temperature measurement

Temperature measurement using modern scientific thermometers and temperature scales goes back at least as far as the early 18th century, when Gabriel Fahrenheit adapted a thermometer (switching to mercury) and a scale both developed by Ole Christensen Røemer. Fahrenheit's scale is still in use, alongside the Celsius scale and the Kelvin scale.

The world's average surface air temperature is about 15 °C. For information on temperature changes relevant to climate change or Earth's geologic past see: Temperature record.

History

Technologies

Many methods have been developed for measuring temperature. Most of these rely on measuring some physical property of a working material that varies with temperature. One of the most common devices for measuring temperature is the glass thermometer. This consists of a glass tube filled with mercury or some other liquid, which acts as the working fluid. Temperature increases cause the fluid to expand, so the temperature can be determined by measuring the volume of the fluid. Such thermometers are usually calibrated, so that one can read the temperature, simply by observing the level of the fluid in the thermometer. Another type of thermometer that is not really used much in practice, but is important from a theoretical standpoint is the gas thermometer.

Other important devices for measuring temperature include:

*Thermocouples
*Thermistors
*Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD)
*Pyrometers
*Langmuir probes (for electron temperature of a plasma)
*Infrared
*Other thermometers

One must be careful when measuring temperature to ensure that the measuring instrument (thermometer, thermocouple, etc) is really the same temperature as the material that is being measured. Under some conditions heat from the measuring instrument can cause a temperature gradient, so the measured temperature is different from the actual temperature of the system. In such a case the measured temperature will vary not only with the temperature of the system, but also with the heat transfer properties of the system. An extreme case of this effect gives rise to the wind chill factor, where the weather feels colder under windy conditions than calm conditions even though the temperature is the same. What is happening is that the wind increases the rate of heat transfer from the body, resulting in a larger reduction in body temperature for the same ambient temperature.

The theoretical basis for thermometers is the zeroth law of thermodynamics which postulates that if you have three bodes, A, B and C, if A and B are at the same temperature, and B and C are at the same temperature then A and C are at the same temperature. B, of course, is the thermometer.

The practical basis of thermometry is the existence of triple point cells. Triple points are conditions of pressure, volume and temperature such that three phases (matter) are simultaneously present, for example solid, vapor and liquid. For a single component there are no degrees of freedom at a triple point and any change in the three variables results in one or more of the phases vanishing from the cell. Therefore, triple point cells can be used as universal references for temperature and pressure. (See Gibb's phase rule)

Under some conditions it becomes possible to measure temperature by a direct use of the Planck's law of black body radiation. For example, the cosmic microwave background temperature has been measured from the spectrum of photons observed by satellite observations such as the WMAP. In the study of the quark-gluon plasma through heavy-ion collisions, single particle spectra sometimes serve as a thermometer.

urface air temperature

Meteorological observatories measure the temperature and humidity of the air near the surface of the Earth usually using thermometers placed in a Stevenson screen, a standardized well-ventilated white-pained instrument shelter. The thermometers should be positioned 1.25–2 m above the ground. Details of this setup are defined by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

The true daily mean, obtained from a thermograph, is approximated by the mean of 24 hourly readings (which is not the same as the mean of the daily minimum and maximum readings). [http://eobglossary.gsfc.nasa.gov/Library/glossary.php3?mode=alpha&seg=s]

See also temperature conversion formulas.

Negative temperatures

:"See main article: Negative temperature."

For some systems and specific definitions of temperature, it is possible to obtain a negative temperature. A system with a negative temperature is not colder than absolute zero, but rather it is, in a sense, "hotter than infinite temperature" ("sic").

ee also

* color temperature
* Planck temperature

External links

* [http://thermodynamics-information.net A Brief History of Temperature Measurement]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Temperature — This article is about the thermodynamic property. For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). A map of global long term monthly average surface air temperatures i …   Wikipedia

  • Temperature examination — Taking a patient s temperature is an initial part of a full clinical examination.Core body temperature is normally carefully controlled within a narrow range so that essential enzymatic reactions can occur. Prolonged temperature elevation… …   Wikipedia

  • temperature — /tem peuhr euh cheuhr, choor , preuh , peuhr cheuhr, choor /, n. 1. a measure of the warmth or coldness of an object or substance with reference to some standard value. The temperature of two systems is the same when the systems are in thermal… …   Universalium

  • measurement — raises four main issues for the sociologist: representation (how many properties of the empirical world can best be modelled?); uniqueness (how unique are the resulting measurement numbers?); appropriate statistics (what indices may legitimately… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Measurement and Signature Intelligence — Measurement and Signature Intelligence, or MASINT, refers to intelligence gathering activities that bring together disparate elements that do not fit within the definitions of the major disciplines mentioned above. As a means of collecting… …   Wikipedia

  • Measurement and signature intelligence — (MASINT) is a branch of intelligence gathering activities. MASINT, may have aspects of intelligence analysis management, since certain aspects of MASINT, such as the analysis of electromagnetic radiation received by signals intelligence are more… …   Wikipedia

  • measurement system — Introduction       any of the systems used in the process of associating numbers with physical quantities and phenomena (metrology). Although the concept of weights and measures (measurement) today includes such factors as temperature, luminosity …   Universalium

  • Measurement — For bust/waist/hip measurement, see BWH. A typical tape measure with both metric and US units and two US pennies for comparison Measurement is the process or the result of determining the ratio of a physical quantity, such as a length, time,… …   Wikipedia

  • Measurement uncertainty — In metrology, measurement uncertainty is a non negative parameter characterizing the dispersion of the values attributed to a measured quantity. The uncertainty has a probabilistic basis and reflects incomplete knowledge of the quantity. All… …   Wikipedia

  • Measurement of sea ice — Annual growth and retreat of the polar ice packs from SeaWiFS images Measurement of sea ice is important for safety of navigation and for monitoring the environment, particularly the climate. Record keeping of direct observations began over a… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.