Antikythera


Antikythera
Antikythera
Αντικύθηρα
Antikythera's harbour Potamos
Antikythera's harbour Potamos
Location
Antikythera is located in Greece
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Antikythera
Coordinates 35°52′N 23°18′E / 35.867°N 23.3°E / 35.867; 23.3Coordinates: 35°52′N 23°18′E / 35.867°N 23.3°E / 35.867; 23.3
Government
Country: Greece
Region: Attica
Regional unit: Islands
Municipality: Kythira
Population statistics (as of 2001)
Municipal unit
 - Population: 44
 - Area: 20.43 km2 (8 sq mi)
 - Density: 2 /km2 (6 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Postal: 801 00
Telephone: 27360
Auto: Z
Website
www.antikythira.gr

Antikythera or Anticythera (English pronunciation: /ˌæntɪkɪˈθɪərə/) (Ancient Greek: Ἀντικύθηρα Greek: Αντικύθηρα, [andiˈciθira]) is a Greek island lying on the edge of the Aegean Sea, between Crete and Peloponnese. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality of Kythira island.[1]

Antikythera may also refer to the Antikythera Strait, through which Modified Mediterranean Water enters the Sea of Crete.[2]

Its land area is 20.43 square kilometers, and it lies 38 kilometers south-east of Kythira. It is the most distant part of the Attica region from its heart in the Athens metropolitan area. It is lozenge-shaped, 10.5 km NNW to SSE by 3.4 km ENE to WSW. It is notable for being the location of the discovery of the Antikythera mechanism and for the historical Antikythera wreck.

Its main settlement and port is Potamós (pop. 18 inhabitants in 2001 census). The only other settlements are Galanianá (pop. 17), and Charchalianá (pop. 9). Antikythera is sporadically visited by the LANE Lines ferry Vitsentzos Kornaros, on its route between Piraeus (Athens) and Kissamos-Kastelli in Crete.

Contents

History

In antiquity, the island of Antikythera was known as Aigila or Ogylos.[3]

Between the 4th and 1st centuries BC, it was used as a base by a group of Cilician pirates until their destruction by Pompey the Great. Their fort can still be seen atop a cliff to the NE of the island.

Antikythera is most famous for being the location of the discovery of the Antikythera wreck, from which the Antikythera Ephebe and Antikythera Mechanism were recovered. The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient mechanical calculator (sometimes described as the first mechanical computer) designed to calculate astronomical positions which has been dated to about 150-100 BC. Technological artifacts of similar complexity did not appear until a thousand years later. It was discovered in an ancient shipwreck off Antikythera in 1900.

Fauna

Antikythera is a very important stop-over site for migratory birds during their seasonal movements, due to its geographical position and certain features (a longitudinal island, with a north-south direction and very low human activities).[4] Furthermore the island hosts the largest breeding colony of Eleonora's Falcon (Falco eleonorae) in the world. The importance of Antikythira for studying bird migration led to the creation of Antikythera Bird Observatory (A.B.O) by the Hellenic Ornithological Society.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ Kallikratis law Greece Ministry of Interior (Greek)
  2. ^ Peter Saundry, C. Michael Hogan & Steve Baum. 2011. Sea of Crete. Encyclopedia of Earth. Eds.M.Pidwirny & C.J.Cleveland. National Council for Science and Environment. Washington DC.
  3. ^ Reger, G. "Map 57: Aegaeum Mare." In Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, edited by R. J. A. Talbert. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.
  4. ^ The Importance of Antikythira

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Antikythera — Antikythera,   neugriechisch Antikythira [ kiθira], italienisch Cerigọtto [tʃeri ], zum Bezirk Attika gehörende griechische Kalkinsel zwischen Kythera und Kreta, 20 km2, bis 378 m über dem Meeresspiegel, 70 Einwohner; Fundort einer antiken… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Antikythera — Gemeinde Andikythira Κοινότητα Αντικυθήρων (Αντικύθηρα) DEC …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Antikythera — /an ti ki thear euh/; Gk. /ahn dee kee thee rddah/, n. an island in the E Mediterranean, NW of Crete: archaeological site. 81/2 sq. mi. (22 sq. km). Also, Andikithira. * * * …   Universalium

  • Antikythera — /an ti ki thear euh/; Gk. /ahn dee kee thee rddah/, n. an island in the E Mediterranean, NW of Crete: archaeological site. 81/2 sq. mi. (22 sq. km). Also, Andikithira …   Useful english dictionary

  • Antikythera mechanism — The Antikythera mechanism (main fragment) The Antikythera mechanism (  / …   Wikipedia

  • Antikythera-Mechanismus — Mechanismus von Antikythera Der Mechanismus von Antikythera, oft auch Computer von Antikythera genannt, ist ein antikes Artefakt aus Zahnrädern, das einem Uhrwerk ähnelt. Es wurde in einem Schiffswrack vor der griechischen Insel Antikythera,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Antikythera Mechanism Research Project — Mechanismus von Antikythera Der Mechanismus von Antikythera, oft auch Computer von Antikythera genannt, ist ein antikes Artefakt aus Zahnrädern, das einem Uhrwerk ähnelt. Es wurde in einem Schiffswrack vor der griechischen Insel Antikythera,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Antikythera wreck — The Antikythera wreck is a shipwreck that was discovered by sponge divers off the coast of the Greek island, Antikythera. Its approximate location is 35° 53 23 (35.8897)N and 23° 18 28 (23.3078)E, 20m off Point Glyphadia . Discovery and artifact… …   Wikipedia

  • Antikythera Ephebe — The bronze Antikythera Ephebe is a statue of a young man of languorous grace that was found by sponge divers in the area of an ancient shipwreck [The wreck itself is dated about 70 60 BC.] off the island of Antikythera [The island, about halfway… …   Wikipedia

  • Mechanismus von Antikythera — Der Mechanismus oder Computer von Antikythera ist ein antikes Artefakt aus Zahnrädern, die ursprünglich ein analogrechnendes mechanisches Kalendarium bildeten. Damit ist der Mechanismus von Antikythera der älteste erhaltene Analogrechner der Welt …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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