Jackstay search

An underwater jackstay search is a search and rescue strategy conducted by two divers swimming along a fixed search line.

There are two techniques for performing a jackstay search.

The first method involves the divers starting at "opposite" ends of the search line, which has been set along the edge of the search area. The two divers swim towards each other, each holding the line in (conventionally) their left hand, thereby each search the area immediately to either side of the line, passing each other at the middle. Once they have each completed the sweep, they then each reset the line on a parallel course, but a few meters further into the search area. They they repeat the sweep, again crossing at the middle, and repeat the pattern until the object of the search is located, or until they cover the entire search area.

The second method involves the divers starting at the "same" end of the search line, which is similarly set along the edge of the search area. The two divers swim together, one on each side of the line, thereby searching the area immediately to either side of the line. Once they have completed the sweep, they then reset that end of the line a few meters further into the search area, so that the line now runs at a slight angle to its original course. They then both sweep back across the line, either searching much of the same ground over again, or simply returning to the start point. Once they reach the start point, they then move the other side of the line a few meters further into the search area so that the line is once again parallel to its original course. They then repeat the pattern until the object of the search is located, or until they cover the entire search area. The second method is longer and slower, and is used more frequently either in extremely limited visibility, where the divers do not wish to lose contact with each other, or where the object sought is particularly small, and they wish run the pattern twice, once from each side, in case the object is masked by a larger object on the sea bed when approach from one side.

Communication

Most public safety divers and many recreational divers use the following line signals while conducting searches underwater.

Tender to diver

*One pull on the line: okay, okay?
*Two pulls: stop, take out slack, reverse direction
*Three pulls: come to the surface
*Four pulls: stop, don't move (there could be danger ahead or a boat entering the search area)

Diver to tender

*One pull on the line: okay, okay?
*Two pulls: advance line
*Three pulls: object found
*Four or more pulls: assistance needed

afety

With the exception of the "okay" signal, the pulls are not acknowledged by the recipient. If the proper response is not noticed after a line signal, it is repeated.

It is important to note that divers should be well trained before attempting this type of search. Because of the potential hazard, many public safety dive teams prefer to have the line tender on shore and modify the search to an arch shaped pattern as opposed to full circles. This is especially important when visibility is poor.

ources

* [http://www.ucidiver.com/jackstay.html Underwater Criminal Investigators - Jackstay search]
* [http://www.bsac.org/uploads/documents/Resources/SDC_Notes/srins.pdf British Sub-Aqua Club - Search & Recovery, Instructor Notes]
* PADI Search & Recovery Manual,


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • jackstay search — noun An underwater search conducted by divers who remain in contact with a rope marking the search line. Each time a diver reaches an end of the rope, that end is moved in a set direction. The divers may start together or at opposite ends of the… …   Wiktionary

  • Underwater search and recovery — is the process of locating and recovering underwater objects by divers.cite book |author=PADI |title=PADI Search Recovery manual. ASIN: B000YPP84E |year=2003 |publisher=PADI |location=United States |isbn= | ] Although most underwater search and… …   Wikipedia

  • Underwater searches — are procedures carried out by divers in order to find a known or suspected target object or objects in a specified search area under water. There are a number of techniques in general use by Commercial, Scientific, Public service, Military, and… …   Wikipedia

  • Diver rescue — Beaching a casualty while providing artificial respiration Diver rescue, following an accident, is the process of avoiding or limiting further exposure to diving hazards and bringing a SCUBA diver to safety.[1] A safe place is often a place where …   Wikipedia

  • Diver communications — are the methods used by divers to communicate with each other or with surface members of the dive team. There are several distinct forms of diver communications: Voice communications Most professional diving equipment such as full face diving… …   Wikipedia

  • USS Princeton (CV-37) — The fifth USS Princeton (CV 37) (also CVA 37, CVS 37, LPH 5) was a United States Navy Sclass|Essex|aircraft carrier (later refit into a Boxer class amphibious assault ship LPH).HistoryCV 37 was laid down as Valley Forge at the Philadelphia Navy… …   Wikipedia

  • Diving equipment — Surface supplied commercial diving equipment on display at a trade show Diving equipment is equipment used by underwater divers for the purpose of facilitating diving activities. This may be equipment primarily intended for this purpose, or… …   Wikipedia

  • Frigate — For the bird, see Frigatebird. A frigate /ˈfrɪgɪt/ [frĭg ĭt] is a warship. The term has been used for warships of many sizes and roles over the past few centuries.In the 18th century, the term referred to ships which were as long as a ship of the …   Wikipedia

  • USS Weiss (APD-135) — USS Weiss (APD/LPR 135) was a Crosley class high speed transport, the second ship of the United States Navy to be assigned the name Weiss , after Marine Sergeant Carl W. Weiss (1915–1942), who was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.