In spite of


In spite of
Spite Spite, n. [Abbreviated fr. despite.] 1. Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

This is the deadly spite that angers. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Vexation; chargrin; mortification. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{In spite of}, or {Spite of}, in opposition to all efforts of; in defiance or contempt of; notwithstanding. ``Continuing, spite of pain, to use a knee after it had been slightly injured.'' --H. Spenser. ``And saved me in spite of the world, the devil, and myself.'' --South. ``In spite of all applications, the patient grew worse every day.'' --Arbuthnot. See Syn. under {Notwithstanding}.

{To owe one a spite}, to entertain a mean hatred for him. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Pique, rancor; malevolence; grudge.

Usage: {Spite}, {Malice}. Malice has more reference to the disposition, and spite to the manifestation of it in words and actions. It is, therefore, meaner than malice, thought not always more criminal. `` Malice . . . is more frequently employed to express the dispositions of inferior minds to execute every purpose of mischief within the more limited circle of their abilities.'' --Cogan. ``Consider eke, that spite availeth naught.'' --Wyatt. See {Pique}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Spite — Spite, n. [Abbreviated fr. despite.] 1. Ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. Pope. [1913 Webster] This is the deadly spite that angers. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spite of — Spite Spite, n. [Abbreviated fr. despite.] 1. Ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. Pope. [1913 Webster] This is the deadly spite that angers.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spite (disambiguation) — Spite or Spiteful may refer to: *a human sentiment, see spite (sentiment) *Spite, in fair division problems, a phenomenon in which a player s value of an allocation decreases when one or more other players valuation increases *HMS Spiteful… …   Wikipedia

  • Spite and Malice — is a card game for two or more players; it is a form of competitive solitaire. It is also known as Cat and Mouse and commercially sold as Skip Bo. A different card game also known as Spite and Malice is sold by Hasbro… …   Wikipedia

  • spite — ► NOUN ▪ a desire to hurt, annoy, or offend. ► VERB ▪ deliberately hurt, annoy, or offend. ● in spite of Cf. ↑in spite of ● in spite of oneself Cf. ↑in spite of oneself …   English terms dictionary

  • Spite (sentiment) — Spite is a strong feeling of contempt, hatred, grudge, desire to injure, motivated by envy or perceived suffering of injustice.The infamous Underground Man, of Fyodor Dostoevsky s well known novella Notes From Underground, is a widely known and… …   Wikipedia

  • spite´ful|ness — spite|ful «SPYT fuhl», adjective. full of spite; eager to annoy; behaving with ill will and malice: »a spiteful remark. The spiteful little girl tore up her older sister s papers. SYNONYM(S): malicious, malevolent. –spite´ful|ly, adverb.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • spite´ful|ly — spite|ful «SPYT fuhl», adjective. full of spite; eager to annoy; behaving with ill will and malice: »a spiteful remark. The spiteful little girl tore up her older sister s papers. SYNONYM(S): malicious, malevolent. –spite´ful|ly, adverb.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • spite|ful — «SPYT fuhl», adjective. full of spite; eager to annoy; behaving with ill will and malice: »a spiteful remark. The spiteful little girl tore up her older sister s papers. SYNONYM(S): malicious, malevolent. –spite´ful|ly, adverb. –spite´ful|ness,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Spite — Spite, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Spited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Spiting}.] 1. To be angry at; to hate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The Danes, then . . . pagans, spited places of religion. Fuller. [1913 Webster] 2. To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spite — [spīt] n. [ME, aphetic < despite: see DESPITE] 1. a) a mean or evil feeling toward another, characterized by the inclination to hurt, humiliate, annoy, frustrate, etc.; ill will; malice b) an instance of this; a grudge 2. Obs. something… …   English World dictionary


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