From

From From (fr[o^]m), prep. [AS. fram, from; akin to OS. fram out, OHG. & Icel. fram forward, Sw. fram, Dan. frem, Goth. fram from, prob. akin to E. forth. ?202. Cf. {Fro}, {Foremost}.] Out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; -- the antithesis and correlative of {to}; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony. [1913 Webster]

Experience from the time past to the time present. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

The song began from Jove. --Drpden. [1913 Webster]

From high M[ae]onia's rocky shores I came. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

If the wind blow any way from shore. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: From sometimes denotes away from, remote from, inconsistent with. ``Anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing.'' --Shak. From, when joined with another preposition or an adverb, gives an opportunity for abbreviating the sentence. ``There followed him great multitudes of people . . . from [the land] beyond Jordan.'' --Math. iv. 25. In certain constructions, as from forth, from out, etc., the ordinary and more obvious arrangment is inverted, the sense being more distinctly forth from, out from -- from being virtually the governing preposition, and the word the adverb. See {From off}, under {Off}, adv., and {From afar}, under {Afar}, adv. [1913 Webster]

Sudden partings such as press The life from out young hearts. --Byron.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • from — preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Old English from, fram; akin to Old High German fram, adverb, forth, away, Old English faran to go more at fare Date: before 12th century 1. a. used as a function word to indicate a starting point of a… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • From Hell — Infobox graphic novel foreigntitle= imagesize= caption= From Hell collected edition. publisher=Eddie Campbell Comics Top Shelf Productions date=1999 (collected edition) series= pages=572 main char team= origpublication= Taboo origissues=10… …   Wikipedia

  • From hand to hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From Here to Eternity — Infobox Film | name = From Here to Eternity caption = original movie poster director = Fred Zinnemann producer = Buddy Adler writer = James Jones (novel) Daniel Taradash starring =Burt Lancaster Montgomery Clift Deborah Kerr Donna Reed Frank… …   Wikipedia

  • From head to foot — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From day to day — Day Day (d[=a]), n. [OE. day, dai, dei, AS. d[ae]g; akin to OS., D., Dan., & Sw. dag, G. tag, Icel. dagr, Goth. dags; cf. Skr. dah (for dhagh ?) to burn. [root]69. Cf. {Dawn}.] 1. The time of light, or interval between one night and the next; the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From forth — Forth Forth, v.[AS. for[eth], fr. for akin to D. voort, G. fort [root]78. See {Fore}, {For}, and cf. {Afford}, {Further}, adv.] 1. Forward; onward in time, place, or order; in advance from a given point; on to end; as, from that day forth; one,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From off — Off Off ([o^]f; 115), adv. [OE. of, orig. the same word as R. of, prep., AS. of, adv. & prep. [root]194. See {Of}.] In a general sense, denoting from or away from; as: [1913 Webster] 1. Denoting distance or separation; as, the house is a mile off …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From fair to middling — Fair Fair (f[^a]r), a. [Compar. {Fairer}; superl. {Fairest}.] [OE. fair, fayer, fager, AS. f[ae]ger; akin to OS. & OHG. fagar, Icel. fagr, Sw. fager, Dan. faver, Goth. fagrs fit, also to E. fay, G. f[ u]gen, to fit. fegen to sweep, cleanse, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • From far — Far Far, adv. 1. To a great extent or distance of space; widely; as, we are separated far from each other. [1913 Webster] 2. To a great distance in time from any point; remotely; as, he pushed his researches far into antiquity. [1913 Webster] 3.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.