Force

Force Force, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Forced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Forcing}.] [OF. forcier, F. forcer, fr. LL. forciare, fortiare. See {Force}, n.] 1. To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor. [1913 Webster]

2. To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind. [1913 Webster]

3. To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one's will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon. [1913 Webster]

To force their monarch and insult the court. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

I should have forced thee soon wish other arms. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

To force a spotless virgin's chastity. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To obtain, overcome, or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress; as, to force the castle; to force a lock. [1913 Webster]

5. To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; -- with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc. [1913 Webster]

It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay That scarce the victor forced the steel away. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

To force the tyrant from his seat by war. --Sahk. [1913 Webster]

Ethelbert ordered that none should be forced into religion. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

6. To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

What can the church force more? --J. Webster. [1913 Webster]

7. To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a conceit or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits. [1913 Webster]

High on a mounting wave my head I bore, Forcing my strength, and gathering to the shore. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

8. (Whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none. [1913 Webster]

9. To provide with forces; to re["e]nforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

10. To allow the force of; to value; to care for. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

For me, I force not argument a straw. --Shak.

Syn: To compel; constrain; oblige; necessitate; coerce; drive; press; impel. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Force — Force, n. [F. force, LL. forcia, fortia, fr. L. fortis strong. See {Fort}, n.] 1. Capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Force K — was a British Royal Navy task force of the Second World War. It operated out of Malta and was responsible for intercepting convoys carrying supplies to the Italian and German forces in North Africa, including Erwin Rommel s Afrika Korps.Force K… …   Wikipedia

  • Force 17 — is an elite commando and special operations unit of the Palestinian Fatah movement and later of the Office of the Chairman of the Palestinian Authority.Force 17 was formed in the early 1970s by senior Fatah militant Ali Hassan Salameh (Abu… …   Wikipedia

  • Force — Force, v. i. [Obs. in all the senses.] 1. To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor. [1913 Webster] Forcing with gifts to win his wanton heart. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Force 10 — may refer to: *Force 10 from Navarone (film) *Force 10 on the Beaufort scale of wind speeds *Gull Force 10, a fuel brand in New Zealand *Force10, an American computer networking company *Force 10, an amusement ride …   Wikipedia

  • Force — Force, n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. fors, foss, Dan. fos.] A waterfall; a cascade. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] To see the falls for force of the river Kent. T. Gray. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Force — Force, v. t. [See {Farce} to stuff.] To stuff; to lard; to farce. [R.] [1913 Webster] Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • FORCE — s. f. Vigueur, faculté naturelle d agir vigoureusement. Il se dit proprement en parlant De l homme et des animaux. Force physique. Grande force. Force extraordinaire. Force de corps. Force de bras. Force de reins. La force d un homme, d un animal …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • Force — For other uses, see Force (disambiguation). See also: Forcing (disambiguation) Forces are also described as a push or pull on an object. They can be due to phenomena such as gravity, magnetism, or anything that might cause a mass to accelerate …   Wikipedia

  • FORCE — n. f. Faculté naturelle d’agir vigoureusement. Il se dit proprement en parlant de l’Homme et des animaux. Force physique. Force musculaire. Une force d’Hercule. Frapper de toute sa force. Manquer de force. Lancer une chose avec force. Crier de… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)


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