To keep from


To keep from
Keep Keep, v. i. 1. To remain in any position or state; to continue; to abide; to stay; as, to keep at a distance; to keep aloft; to keep near; to keep in the house; to keep before or behind; to keep in favor; to keep out of company, or out reach. [1913 Webster]

2. To last; to endure; to remain unimpaired. [1913 Webster]

If the malt be not thoroughly dried, the ale it makes will not keep. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster]

3. To reside for a time; to lodge; to dwell. [Now disused except locally or colloquially.] [1913 Webster]

Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To take care; to be solicitous; to watch. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Keep that the lusts choke not the word of God that is in us. --Tyndale. [1913 Webster]

5. To be in session; as, school keeps to-day. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

{To keep from}, to abstain or refrain from.

{To keep in with}, to keep on good terms with; as, to keep in with an opponent.

{To keep on}, to go forward; to proceed; to continue to advance.

{To keep to}, to adhere strictly to; not to neglect or deviate from; as, to keep to old customs; to keep to a rule; to keep to one's word or promise.

{To keep up}, to remain unsubdued; also, not to be confined to one's bed. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • keep from — {v.}, {informal} To hold yourself back from; stop or prevent yourself from (doing something). * /Can you keep from repeating gossip?/ * /Jill can t keep from talking about her trip./ Usually used with can in the negative. * /You can t keep from… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • keep from — {v.}, {informal} To hold yourself back from; stop or prevent yourself from (doing something). * /Can you keep from repeating gossip?/ * /Jill can t keep from talking about her trip./ Usually used with can in the negative. * /You can t keep from… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • How Can I Keep from Singing? — (also known by its incipit My Life Flows On in Endless Song ) is a Christian hymn with music written by American Baptist minister Robert Wadsworth Lowry. The song is frequently, though erroneously, cited as a traditional Quaker hymn. The original …   Wikipedia

  • This Guitar (Can't Keep from Crying) — Infobox Single Name = This Guitar (Can t Keep from Crying) Cover size = Caption = Artist = George Harrison from Album = Extra Texture (Read All About It) A side = B side = Maya Love Released = December 8, 1975 (U.S.) February 6, 1976 (UK) Format …   Wikipedia

  • Keep — (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Keep — Keep, v. i. 1. To remain in any position or state; to continue; to abide; to stay; as, to keep at a distance; to keep aloft; to keep near; to keep in the house; to keep before or behind; to keep in favor; to keep out of company, or out reach.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • keep one's head above water — {v. phr.} To remain solvent; manage to stay out of debt. * /Herb s income declined so drastically that he now has difficulty keeping his head above water./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • keep one's head above water — {v. phr.} To remain solvent; manage to stay out of debt. * /Herb s income declined so drastically that he now has difficulty keeping his head above water./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • keep one's shirt on — {v. phr.}, {slang} To calm down; keep from losing your temper or getting impatient or excited. * /Bob got very angry when John accidentally bumped into him, but John told him to keep his shirt on./ Usually used as a command; may be considered… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • keep one's shirt on — {v. phr.}, {slang} To calm down; keep from losing your temper or getting impatient or excited. * /Bob got very angry when John accidentally bumped into him, but John told him to keep his shirt on./ Usually used as a command; may be considered… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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