The Law


The Law
Laws Laws n. the first five books of the Old Testament, also called {The Law} and {Torah}.

Syn: Pentateuch, Law of Moses, Torah. [WordNet 1.5]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To have the law of — Law Law (l[add]), n. [OE. lawe, laghe, AS. lagu, from the root of E. lie: akin to OS. lag, Icel. l[ o]g, Sw. lag, Dan. lov; cf. L. lex, E. legal. A law is that which is laid, set, or fixed; like statute, fr. L. statuere to make to stand. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take the law of — Law Law (l[add]), n. [OE. lawe, laghe, AS. lagu, from the root of E. lie: akin to OS. lag, Icel. l[ o]g, Sw. lag, Dan. lov; cf. L. lex, E. legal. A law is that which is laid, set, or fixed; like statute, fr. L. statuere to make to stand. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take the law into one's own hands — {v. phr.} To protect one s supposed rights or punish a suspected wrongdoer without reference to a court. An overused expression. * /When the men of the settlement caught the suspected murderer, they took the law into their own hands and hanged… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the law into one's own hands — {v. phr.} To protect one s supposed rights or punish a suspected wrongdoer without reference to a court. An overused expression. * /When the men of the settlement caught the suspected murderer, they took the law into their own hands and hanged… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • lay down the law — {v. phr.} 1. To give strict orders. * /The teacher lays down the law about homework every afternoon./ 2. To speak severely or seriously about a wrongdoing; scold. * /The principal called in the students and laid down the law to them about… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • lay down the law — {v. phr.} 1. To give strict orders. * /The teacher lays down the law about homework every afternoon./ 2. To speak severely or seriously about a wrongdoing; scold. * /The principal called in the students and laid down the law to them about… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Limb of the law — Limb Limb (l[i^]m), n. [OE. lim, AS. lim; akin to Icel. limr limb, lim branch of a tree, Sw. & Dan. lem limb; cf. also AS. li[eth], OHG. lid, gilid, G. glied, Goth. li[thorn]us. Cf. {Lith}, {Limber}.] 1. A part of a tree which extends from the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Book of the Law of Moses — Pentateuch Pen ta*teuch, n. [L. pentateuchus, Gr. ?; ? (see {Penta }) + ? a tool, implement, a book, akin to ? to prepare, make ready, and perh. to E. text. See {Five}, and {Text}.] The first five books of the Old Testament, collectively; called… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Nine points of the law — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Law — (l[add]), n. [OE. lawe, laghe, AS. lagu, from the root of E. lie: akin to OS. lag, Icel. l[ o]g, Sw. lag, Dan. lov; cf. L. lex, E. legal. A law is that which is laid, set, or fixed; like statute, fr. L. statuere to make to stand. See {Lie} to be… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.