Sound

Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. ``And first taught speaking trumpets how to sound.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound. [1913 Webster]

From you sounded out the word of the Lord. --1 Thess. i. 8. [1913 Webster]

3. To make or convey a certain impression, or to have a certain import, when heard; hence, to seem; to appear; as, this reproof sounds harsh; the story sounds like an invention. [1913 Webster]

Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear Things that do sound so fair? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in} or {To sound into}, to tend to; to partake of the nature of; to be consonant with. [Obs., except in the phrase To sound in damages, below.] [1913 Webster]

Soun[d]ing in moral virtue was his speech. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in damages} (Law), to have the essential quality of damages. This is said of an action brought, not for the recovery of a specific thing, as replevin, etc., but for damages only, as trespass, and the like. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Sound — Sound, a. [Compar. {Sounder}; superl. {Soundest}.] [OE. sound, AS. sund; akin to D. gezond, G. gesund, OHG. gisunt, Dan. & Sw. sund, and perhaps to L. sanus. Cf. {Sane}.] 1. Whole; unbroken; unharmed; free from flaw, defect, or decay; perfect of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, n. [OE. soun, OF. son, sun, F. son, fr. L. sonus akin to Skr. svana sound, svan to sound, and perh. to E. swan. Cf. {Assonant}, {Consonant}, {Person}, {Sonata}, {Sonnet}, {Sonorous}, {Swan}.] 1. The peceived object occasioned by the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, v. t. 1. To cause to make a noise; to play on; as, to sound a trumpet or a horn; to sound an alarm. [1913 Webster] A bagpipe well could he play and soun[d]. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to exit as a sound; as, to sound a note with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sounding}.] [F. sonder; cf. AS. sundgyrd a sounding rod, sundline a sounding line (see {Sound} a narrow passage of water).] 1. To measure the depth of; to fathom; especially, to ascertain the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, n. [AS. sund a narrow sea or strait; akin to Icel., Sw., Dan. & G. sund, probably so named because it could be swum across. See {Swim}.] (Geog.) A narrow passage of water, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound 80 — was a recording studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States founded by Tom Jung and Herb Pilhofer in 1969. Largely involved with local artists, the studio is best known for recording portions of Bob Dylan s Blood on the Tracks in 1974, but… …   Wikipedia

  • Sound — [saʊnd] bezeichnet: die Klangfarbe elektroakustischer Musikinstrumente die Klangfarbe des von Beschallungsanlagen wiedergegebenen Schalls den spezifischen Klang einer Musikrichtung (Musikstilistik) The Sound, eine britische Band Sound (Berliner… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sound — Sound, adv. Soundly. [1913 Webster] So sound he slept that naught might him awake. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, v. i. To ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device. [1913 Webster] I sound as a shipman soundeth in the sea with his plummet to know the depth of sea. Palsgrave. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound — Sound, n. [F. sonde. See {Sound} to fathom.] (Med.) Any elongated instrument or probe, usually metallic, by which cavities of the body are sounded or explored, especially the bladder for stone, or the urethra for a stricture. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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