More and more


More and more
More More, adv. 1. In a greater quantity; in or to a greater extent or degree. (a) With a verb or participle. [1913 Webster]

Admiring more The riches of Heaven's pavement. --Milton. [1913 Webster] (b) With an adjective or adverb (instead of the suffix -er) to form the comparative degree; as, more durable; more active; more sweetly. [1913 Webster]

Happy here, and more happy hereafter. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Note: Double comparatives were common among writers of the Elizabeth period, and for some time later; as, more brighter; more dearer. [1913 Webster]

The duke of Milan And his more braver daughter. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. In addition; further; besides; again. [1913 Webster]

Yet once more, O ye laurels, and once more, Ye myrtles brown, with ivy never sere, I come to pluck your berries harsh and crude. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{More and more}, with continual increase. ``Amon trespassed more and more.'' --2 Chron. xxxiii. 23.

{The more}, to a greater degree; by an added quantity; for a reason already specified.

{The more -- the more}, by how much more -- by so much more. ``The more he praised it in himself, the more he seems to suspect that in very deed it was not in him.'' --Milton.

{To be no more}, to have ceased to be; as, Cassius is no more; Troy is no more. [1913 Webster]

Those oracles which set the world in flames, Nor ceased to burn till kingdoms were no more. --Byron. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • More — More, adv. 1. In a greater quantity; in or to a greater extent or degree. (a) With a verb or participle. [1913 Webster] Admiring more The riches of Heaven s pavement. Milton. [1913 Webster] (b) With an adjective or adverb (instead of the suffix… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • More — More, a., compar. [Positive wanting; superl. {Most} (m[=o]st).] [OE. more, mare, and (orig. neut. and adv.) mo, ma, AS. m[=a]ra, and (as neut. and adv.) m[=a]; akin to D. meer, OS. m[=e]r, G. mehr, OHG. m[=e]ro, m[=e]r, Icel. meiri, meirr, Dan.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • More — More, n. 1. A greater quantity, amount, or number; that which exceeds or surpasses in any way what it is compared with. [1913 Webster] And the children of Israel did so, and gathered, some more, some less. Ex. xvi. 17. [1913 Webster] 2. That… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • More — or Mores may refer to: More (surname), a family name, including a list of people with the surname Contents 1 Computers 2 Film 3 …   Wikipedia

  • and then some — And a lot more; and more too. * /It would cost all the money he had and then some./ * /Talking his way out of this trouble was going to take all his wits and then some./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • and then some — And a lot more; and more too. * /It would cost all the money he had and then some./ * /Talking his way out of this trouble was going to take all his wits and then some./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • And did those feet in ancient time — is a short poem by William Blake from the preface to his epic Milton a Poem, one of a collection of writings known as the Prophetic Books. The date on the title page of 1804 for Milton is probably when the plates were begun, but the poem was… …   Wikipedia

  • and so forth — or[and so on] And more of the same kind; and further amounts or things like the ones already mentioned. * /The costumes were red, pink, blue, purple, yellow, and so forth./ Compare: WHAT HAVE YOU …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • and so forth — or[and so on] And more of the same kind; and further amounts or things like the ones already mentioned. * /The costumes were red, pink, blue, purple, yellow, and so forth./ Compare: WHAT HAVE YOU …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • and candle — Bell Bell, n. [AS. belle, fr. bellan to bellow. See {Bellow}.] 1. A hollow metallic vessel, usually shaped somewhat like a cup with a flaring mouth, containing a clapper or tongue, and giving forth a ringing sound on being struck. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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