Ascribe


Ascribe
Ascribe As*cribe", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ascribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ascribing}.] [L. ascribere, adscribere, to ascribe; ad + scribere to write: cf. OF. ascrire. See {Scribe}.] 1. To attribute, impute, or refer, as to a cause; as, his death was ascribed to a poison; to ascribe an effect to the right cause; to ascribe such a book to such an author. [1913 Webster]

The finest [speech] that is ascribed to Satan in the whole poem. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. To attribute, as a quality, or an appurtenance; to consider or allege to belong. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To {Ascribe}, {Attribute}, {Impute}.

Usage: Attribute denotes, 1. To refer some quality or attribute to a being; as, to attribute power to God. 2. To refer something to its cause or source; as, to attribute a backward spring to icebergs off the coast. Ascribe is used equally in both these senses, but involves a different image. To impute usually denotes to ascribe something doubtful or wrong, and hence, in general literature, has commonly a bad sense; as, to impute unworthy motives. The theological sense of impute is not here taken into view. [1913 Webster]

More than good-will to me attribute naught. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Ascribes his gettings to his parts and merit. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

And fairly quit him of the imputed blame. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ascribe — [ə skrīb′] vt. ascribed, ascribing [ME ascriben (also ascriven < OFr ascriv , stem of ascrire) < L ascribere < ad , to + scribere, to write: see SCRIBE] 1. to assign (something) to a supposed cause; impute; attribute 2. to regard… …   English World dictionary

  • ascribe — I verb accord, accredit, adsignare, affiliate, allege to belong, apply, appropriate, ascribere, assign, attach, attribuere, attribute, charge with, connect with, credit with, derive from, filiate, give, impute, point to, predicate, refer to,… …   Law dictionary

  • ascribe — ► VERB (ascribe to) 1) attribute (a particular cause, person, or period) to. 2) regard (a quality) as belonging to. DERIVATIVES ascribable adjective ascription noun. ORIGIN Latin ascribere, from scribere write …   English terms dictionary

  • ascribe to — index blame Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • ascribe — (v.) mid 14c., ascrive, from O.Fr. ascrivre to inscribe; attribute, impute, from L. ascribere to write in, to add to in a writing, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + scribere to write (see SCRIPT (Cf. script)). Spelling restored by 16c. Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • ascribe — ascribe, attribute, impute, assign, refer, credit, accredit, charge mean to lay something (creditable, discreditable, or neutral) to the account of a person or thing. The first four of these words are often used interchangeably without marked… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • ascribe — [v] assign to source accredit, attribute, charge, credit, hang on, impute, lay, pin on*, refer, reference, set down; concepts 39,49 …   New thesaurus

  • ascribe to — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms ascribe to : present tense I/you/we/they ascribe to he/she/it ascribes to present participle ascribing to past tense ascribed to past participle ascribed to formal 1) ascribe something to something to believe… …   English dictionary

  • ascribe — [[t]əskra͟ɪb[/t]] ascribes, ascribing, ascribed 1) VERB If you ascribe an event or condition to a particular cause, you say or consider that it was caused by that thing. [FORMAL] [V n to n] An autopsy eventually ascribed the baby s death to… …   English dictionary

  • ascribe — transitive verb (ascribed; ascribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascribere, from ad + scribere to write more at scribe Date: 15th century to refer to a supposed cause, source, or author • ascribable adjective Synonyms: ascribe,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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