Eusebius the Hermit


Eusebius the Hermit

Saint Eusebius the Hermit was a fourth century monk solitary of Syria.

Eusebius undertook a rigorously ascetic life living without shelter near a mountain village named Asicha.

According to Eastern Christian sources:

Though he was elderly and infirm, he ate only fifteen figs during the Great Forty day Fast. When many people began to flock to St. Eusebius, he went to a nearby monastery, built a small enclosure at the monastery walls and lived in it until his death. [http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsLife.asp?FSID=100530]

Saint Eusebius the Hermit of Syria is commemorated 15 February by the Eastern Orthodox and Byzantine Catholic Churches.

References

[http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsLife.asp?FSID=100530 Orthodox Church in America]

See also

*Stylites
*Desert Fathers
*Poustinia


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