Dublin, California


Dublin, California
City of Dublin
—  City  —
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°42′08″N 121°56′09″W / 37.70222°N 121.93583°W / 37.70222; -121.93583Coordinates: 37°42′08″N 121°56′09″W / 37.70222°N 121.93583°W / 37.70222; -121.93583
Country  United States
State  California
County Alameda
Government
 – Mayor Tim Sbranti
 – State Senate Loni Hancock (D)
 – State Assembly Mary Hayashi (D)
 – U. S. Congress Jerry McNerney (D)
Area[1]
 – Total 14.912 sq mi (38.622 km2)
 – Land 14.908 sq mi (38.611 km2)
 – Water 0.004 sq mi (0.011 km2)  0.03%
Elevation 367 ft (112 m)
Population (2010)
 – Total 46,036
 – Density 3,088/sq mi (1,192.3/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 – Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 94568
Area code(s) 925
FIPS code 06-20018
GNIS feature ID 1655980
Website www.ci.dublin.ca.us
The public library in Dublin

Dublin (formerly, Amador and Dougherty's Station) is a suburban city of the East (San Francisco) Bay region of Alameda County, California, United States. Located along the north side of Interstate 580 at the intersection with Interstate 680, roughly 10 miles (16 km) east of Hayward, 6 miles (9.7 km) west of Livermore and 25 miles (40 km) north of San Jose, it was named after the city of Dublin in Ireland[citation needed]. The nearest major metropolitan area is Oakland, approximately 25 miles (40 km) to the west-northwest on Interstate 580. The population was about 46,063 according to the 2010 United States Census. By 2030, it is estimated to grow to 75,900.[citation needed] Dublin is home to the headquarters of Sybase, Inc and Arlen Ness. The City of Dublin was named an All-America City in 2011 by the National Civic League, after considering Dublin's community projects. [1].

Contents

Government

The City of Dublin is a general law city operating under a City Council / City Manager form of local government. This form of government combines an elected mayor and council and an appointed local government administrator. The City Council elections are nonpartisan. The Mayor serves a two-year term, and Council members serve four-year terms.

As of November 2010 Tim Sbranti was Mayor, Kevin Hart ViceMayor, Kasie Hildenbrand, Don Biddle, and Eric Swalwell Council members.

Responsibilities - The Mayor and City Council, as a collegial body, are responsible for setting policy, setting / prioritizing goals and objectives, and approving the budget. The Mayor, with confirmation by the City Council, makes appointments to the City's advisory commissions and committees.

The majority of California cities, Dublin included, operate under the council / manager form of government. The Council appoints the City Manager, who is responsible for the day-to-day administrative operation of the City, including:

  • Delivery of services
  • Hiring of personnel
  • Implementation of capital projects
  • Preparation of the budget

About the Mayor - The mayor as of 2010, Tim Sbranti, Class of 1993 graduate of Dublin High School (where he was Student Body President) took office in 2008. Sbranti also teaches journalism and is head of student activities at Dublin High School.[2]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.9 square miles (40 km2) of which 0.03% is water.

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[3] reported that Dublin had a population of 46,036. The population density was 3,087.1 people per square mile (1,192.0/km²). The racial makeup of Dublin was 23,634 (51.3%) White, 4,347 (9.4%) African American, 246 (0.5%) Native American, 12,321 (26.8%) Asian, 287 (0.6%) Pacific Islander, 2,458 (5.3%) from other races, and 2,743 (6.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6,663 persons (14.5%).

The Census reported that 40,262 people (87.5% of the population) lived in households, 92 (0.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 5,682 (12.3%) were institutionalized.

There were 14,913 households, out of which 5,897 (39.5%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 8,615 (57.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,383 (9.3%) had a female householder with no husband present, 615 (4.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 775 (5.2%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 142 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 3,201 households (21.5%) were made up of individuals and 578 (3.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70. There were 10,613 families (71.2% of all households); the average family size was 3.19.

The population was spread out with 10,297 people (22.4%) under the age of 18, 3,703 people (8.0%) aged 18 to 24, 17,587 people (38.2%) aged 25 to 44, 11,092 people (24.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 3,357 people (7.3%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.3 years. For every 100 females there were 108.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.4 males.

There were 15,782 housing units at an average density of 1,058.3 per square mile (408.6/km²), of which 9,425 (63.2%) were owner-occupied, and 5,488 (36.8%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.5%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.0%. 26,954 people (58.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 13,308 people (28.9%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

In 2000, there were 9,325 households and 6,508 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,232.9 people per square mile (1,412.1/km²). There are about 9,872 housing units at an average density of 784.3 per square mile (302.7/km²).

There were 9,325 households out of which 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.9% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was 21.0% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 44.1% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 4.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 111.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.4 males. The average income for a household in the city is $101,550.[4] Males had a median income of $77,605 versus $48,116 for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,451. About 1.9% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Top Employers

According to the City's 2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[5] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 United States Government
(including Federal Correctional Institution, Dublin)
2,100
2 Carl Zeiss Meditec 830
3 Sybase 730
4 Dublin Unified School District 580
5 DTI | Dental Technologies Inc. 550
6 County of Alameda 480
7 Safeway 400
8 City of Dublin 217
9 Franklin Templeton Investments 200
10 Avaya 180
10 Target 180

History

The Murray Schoolhouse was built in 1856 and moved twice to its present location in the Dublin Heritage Center.
Historic Green's Store is now used as a church.

Dublin Boulevard, a generally east/west road running just north of Interstate 580, was a part of the Lincoln Highway and later U.S. Route 50. The street formerly curved southward near today's Hansen Drive to follow present-day Dublin Canyon Road toward Hayward.

Several historical sites are preserved and located where Dublin Boulevard is crossed by Donlan Way, itself formerly the northernmost segment of the main road to Sunol and Niles Canyon (present-day Foothill Road):

In 1960, the first housing tracts were built in Dublin, transforming the formerly rural community into a suburb. It grew steadily from the early 1960s onward as both a residential and retail center. The City incorporated in February 1982.

Although a post office operated from 1860 to 1908 in Dougherty, which broke off from Dublin, Dublin's first post office was opened in 1963.[6]

The popular Discovery Channel program MythBusters has filmed over 25 episodes in Dublin at the Alameda County Sherrif's Office bomb disposal range.[7]

Building Dublin

Following Grocery Outlet’s lead, Half Price Books, Sprouts Farmers Market, and Sports Authority are scheduled to open in Dublin’s resilient Downtown district in 2011. In East Dublin, the Shops at Waterford will once again be at full occupancy with the arrival of Fidelity Investments and Coco Cabana [2].

Dublin also unveiled another jewel with the grand opening of Fallon Sports Park in East Dublin in 2010. The highly anticipated first phase of the Fallon Sports Park includes two adult softball fields, two little league baseball fields, two synthetic turf soccer fields, four lighted basketball courts, four lighted tennis courts, and a rough grade BMX bike facility [3].

The first wave of the Dublin Boulevard Corridor Enhancements project is now complete. With the installation of new identity markers, trash cans, landscaping, and other design elements along Dublin Boulevard and at key entry ways, Dublin has enhanced its overall visual appeal, unified the different parts of this growing city, and greatly boosted civic pride [4].

Avalon Dublin Station, a newly-completed luxury rental development by AvalonBay Communities is one of several new real estate projects in Dublin. Danville, California-based development firm Blake Hunt Ventures, is planning a 27-acre (110,000 m2) project using 13 acres (53,000 m2) which it currently owns and an adjacent property which it is purchasing from IKEA. The planned development (which the company expects to contain a specialty grocery store, a mix of restaurants, apparel stores, home goods and retailers) includes a "Main Street" running east-west through the site, a central walkway and a "town green." A TOD (Transit Oriented Development) has started construction near the Dublin/Pleasanton BART station. Dublin is also going through a lot of remodeling with almost every shopping center in Dublin being remodeled, and two new ones, one is located by Regal cinema in east Dublin and one with a Starbucks just down the road from Dublin's High School. East Dublin has also opened a new K-8 school named Fallon which is conveniently located next to new townhomes. Also the Emerald Glen park will be expanding with a man made lake and walking trails. A new BART station in West Dublin will begin to be built in 2007. The project cost is $80 million and opened in March, 2011.[8] The West Dublin/Pleasanton station TOD will also include a hotel, restaurant, 210 apartments, and 170,000 sq ft (16,000 m2). of office space across the Interstate 580 freeway in Pleasanton.

Dublin has faced very tough times between 2008 and 2011 and has several large retail buildings awaiting a new tenant. Mervyns—7117 Regional St. National Food Laboratory—6363 Clark Ave. DHL—6700 Golden Gate Dr. Crown Chevrolet—7544 Dublin Blvd. The Ultimate Car Toys—6207 Sierra Ct.

Whole Foods Market has put their plans for a Dublin store on hold [5].

Saint Patrick's Day Parade

Dublin is known for its Saint Patrick's Day Parade, sponsored by the Dublin Host Lions Club. Every year around Saint Patrick's Day many tourists from all around Alameda County and the Tri-Valley show up to enjoy the festivities. The parade is followed by an all-weekend fair, where one can buy various knick-knacks and other items usually sold at fairs.

In 2007, the fair was moved to Dublin Blvd. which connected the fair to the growing population in East Dublin and increased the fair's size.

Measure M

In 2000, following a conflict with Mayor Houston and developers of the "West Dublin Hills", Morgan King and David Bewley began an initiative known as Measure M. The objective was to prevent the Dublin Hills from becoming too overwhelmed with housing that had been promised to voters would not be built on their preserved open space. Measure M won in every precinct in Dublin and on the absentee ballots.[9]

Education

Dublin is home to the following public schools administered by the Dublin Unified School District. Dublin Partners in Education a non-profit education foundation formed in 1992 to support Dublin public education.

  • Dublin High School, located on Village Parkway, as of September 2011 Dublin High School had 1,658 students and a faculty of 91. Dublin High School's API (Academic Performance Index) in 2011 was 879 (a 12-point increase over 2010) and graduation rate in 2011 was 97.47% (up from 96.16% in 2010).[10] Dublin High School's UC admission rate for 2008-9 was 84%[11]. Dublin High is nearing the completion of a $120M renewal project funded by Bond Measure 'C' and will have a capacity for 2,500 students when the renewal project is complete in 2012-13.[12] The principal is Mrs. Carol Shimizu. Dublin High School was included in Newsweek's 2010 List of America's Top Public High Schools.[13]
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/dhs
  • Valley High School, is the continuation school in the Dublin Unified School District, it has around 120 students and 10 teachers. It is one of only 2 continuation schools in the Tri-Valley area. Some students come from as far as Oakland to attend the school. Valley High School was named a Model Continuation School by the California State Board of Education in 2010.[14]
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/vhs
  • Fallon Middle School, located on Kohnen Way
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/fms
  • Wells Middle School, located on Penn Drive
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/wms
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/jds
  • Dublin Elementary School, located on Vomac Road.
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/des
  • Frederiksen Elementary School, located on Tamarack Drive
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/fes
  • Green Elementary School, located on Antone Way
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/ges
  • Kolb Elementary School, located on Palermo Way
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/kes
  • Murray Elementary, located on Davona Drive
Website: http://www.dublin.k12.ca.us/mes

Dublin is also home to the following private schools:

  • Valley Christian Schools, a ministry of Valley Christian Center, is located just west of Dublin Blvd and San Ramon Rd in Dublin California, is a 1,300 student Christian prep school comprising Valley Christian Preschool, Valley Christian Elementary School, Valley Christian Junior High and Valley Christian Senior High.
  • Quarry Lane School, a non-parochial K-12 school. Quarry Lane School has two other branches in the neighboring city of Pleasanton, CA. Quarry Lane School offers an International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma program at the high school level.[15]
  • St. Raymond School, Catholic school. Ranges from grades K-8
  • St. Philip Lutheran School. Preschool & grades K-8
Website: http://www.stphiliplutheranschool.com/

Camp Parks

The Parks Reserve Forces Training Area (PRFTA), historically known as Camp Parks, is located in Dublin.

A sub-installation of Fort McCoy, Camp Parks is the only training facility within a short drive for the 11,000-plus reservists in the San Francisco Bay Area. Firing ranges and a wide variety of training facilities are available. The post is home to state-of-the-art facilities: the Regional Training Site-Intelligence, Regional Training Site-Medical and the 91st DIV Battle Projection Center. Growth is on the horizon as new facilities have been built and more are programmed for construction in the near future. [16]

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census
  2. ^ Interview with Tim Sbranti
  3. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  4. ^ The City of Dublin, California - Demographic Information
  5. ^ City of Dublin CAFR
  6. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 626. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  7. ^ "Kari Byron – Host of Head Rush, Mythbusters – speaks with OneDublin.org". OneDublin.org. 2010-09-15. http://onedublin.org/2010/09/15/kari-byron-host-of-head-rush-mythbusters-speaks-with-onedublin-org/. 
  8. ^ BART - Projects, West Dublin/Plesanton
  9. ^ City Council Minutes March 19, 2001
  10. ^ "Dublin High School 2011 API, STAR and CHSEE Results". 2011-08-31. http://onedublin.org/dublin-unified-school-district-api-results/dublin-high-school-2011-api-star-and-chsee-results/. 
  11. ^ "Dublin High School UC Admission Rate". http://onedublin.org/dublin-high-school-dublin-california-overview/dublin-high-school-uc-admission-rate/. 
  12. ^ Dublin High School $120M Renewal Project
  13. ^ Dublin High School Included in Newsweek's 2010 List of America's Top Public High Schools
  14. ^ "Valley High School: A Model Continuation School". http://onedublin.org/2011/03/20/valley-high-school-a-model-continuation-school/. 
  15. ^ "The Quarry Lane School Offers Tri-Valley’s First International Baccalaureate (IB) Program". Dublin Patch. 2010-09-30. http://dublin.patch.com/articles/quarry-lane-builds-on-tri-valleys-first-international-baccalaureate-ib-program. 
  16. ^ Camp Parks Reserve Forces Training Area (PRFTA)

External links


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