Lace


Lace

Lace is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be formed via removal of threads or cloth from a previously woven fabric, but more often open spaces are created as part of the lace fabric. Lace-making is an ancient craft. True lace was not made until the late 15th and early 16th centuries. A true lace is created when a thread is looped, twisted or braided to other threads independently from a backing fabric.

Originally linen, silk, gold, or silver threads were used. Now lace is often made with cotton thread. Manufactured lace may be made of synthetic fiber. A few modern artists make lace with a fine copper or silver wire instead of thread.

Types of Lace

There are many types of lace, defined by how they are made. These include:

* Needle lace; made using a needle and thread. This is the most flexible of the lace-making arts. While some types can be made more quickly than the finest of bobbin laces, others are very time-consuming. Some purists regard Needle lace as the height of lace-making. The finest antique needle laces were [made] from a very fine thread that is not manufactured today.

* Cutwork, or whitework; lace constructed by removing threads from a woven background, and the remaining threads wrapped or filled with embroidery.

* Bobbin Lace; as the name suggests, made with bobbins and a pillow. The bobbins, turned from wood, bone or plastic, hold threads which are woven together and held in place with pins stuck in the pattern on the pillow. The pillow contains straw, preferably oat straw or other materials such as sawdust, insulation styrofoam or ethafoam. Also known as Bone-lace.

*Tape lace; makes the tape in the lace as it is worked, or uses a machine- or hand-made textile strip formed into a design, then joined and embellished with needle or bobbin lace.

*Knotted lace; including Macramé and Tatting. Tatted lace is made with a shuttle or a tatting needle.

*Crocheted lace; including Irish crochet, pineapple crochet, and filet crochet.

* Knitted lace; including Shetland lace, such as the "wedding ring shawl", a lace shawl so fine that it can be pulled through a wedding ring.

* Machine-made; any style of lace created or replicated using mechanical means.

History of Lace

References to lace are made in the Bible in the Book of Exodus (, King James Version). Lace was used by clergy of the early Catholic Church as part of vestments in religious ceremonies, but did not come into widespread use until the 16th century. [http://www.lacemakerslace.oddquine.co.uk/history.html] The popularity of lace increased rapidly and the cottage industry of lace making spread throughout Europe to most European countries. Countries like Belgium, Russia, Ireland, Spain, Hungary, Malta and others all have their own unique artistic heritage expressed through lace.

In North America in the 19th century, lace making was spread to the Native American tribes through missionaries. [http://lace.lacefairy.com/ID/IndianLace.html]

Gallery

ee also

* Needlework
* Crochet
* Silk
* Bobbin
* Ribbons
* See-through clothing

External links

* [http://www.museocaprai.it/ Virtual Museum of Textile Arts]
* [http://www.libraryireland.com/IrishLace/Introduction.php/ A Renascence of the Irish Art of Lace-making]
* [http://www.oidfa.com International Bobbin and Needle Lace Organisation]
* [http://www.internationaloldlacers.org/ International Old Lacers]
* [http://www.laceguild.demon.co.uk English lace organization]
* [http://www.italiainvita.it/ Italian lace and embroidery organization]
* [http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/education/lacestudycentre.asp Australian lace museum]
* [http://www.marlamallett.com/l-bobbin.htm Antique Bobbin Lace]
* [http://www.irishlace.org/ Irish Lace]
* [http://www.stuartking.co.uk/index.php/bobbin-making/ The Craft of Bobbin Making]


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • lace — lace …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • lacé — lacé …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Lace — • The two earliest known specimens of lace worked linen albs are that of St. Francis, preserved at St. Clare s convent, Assisi, and the alb of Pope Boniface VIII, now in the treasury of the Sistine Chapel Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Lace — (l[=a]s), n. [OE. las, OF. laz, F. lacs, dim. lacet, fr. L. laqueus noose, snare; prob. akin to lacere to entice. Cf. {Delight}, {Elicit}, {Lasso}, {Latchet}.] 1. That which binds or holds, especially by being interwoven; a string, cord, or band …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lace — Lace, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laced} ([=a]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lacing}.] 1. To fasten with a lace; to draw together with a lace passed through eyelet holes; to unite with a lace or laces, or, figuratively. with anything resembling laces. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lace — [lās] n. [ME las < OFr las, laz < L laqueus, a noose, snare, trap < IE base * lēk > OE læla, a whip] 1. a string, ribbon, etc. used to draw together and fasten the parts of a shoe, corset, etc. by being drawn through eyelets or over… …   English World dictionary

  • Lace — Lace, v. i. To be fastened with a lace, or laces; as, these boots lace. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lace-up — n [C usually plural] especially BrE a shoe that is fastened with a lace >lace up adj ▪ shiny black lace up shoes …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lacé — lacé, ée (la sé, sée) part. passé de lacer. 1°   Serré avec un lacet. Corset bien lacé. Une femme lacée. 2°   S. m. Lacé, entrelacement de petits grains de verre, dont on orne les lustres …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • lace-up — (adj.) 1831, originally of boots, from LACE (Cf. lace) (v.) + UP (Cf. up) …   Etymology dictionary


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