West North Central States


West North Central States

.

Seven states comprise the division: Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota, and it makes up the western half of the United States Census Bureau's larger region of the Midwest, the eastern half of which consists of the East North Central States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. The Mississippi River marks the bulk of the boundary between these two divisions.

Where the East North Central States are seen as being synonymous (though not absolutely coterminous) with the Rust Belt by the vast majority of Americans, the West North Central States are regarded as constituting the core of the nation's "Farm Belt." Almost all of the territory contained within the West North Central division falls into what Joel Garreau called The Breadbasket in his 1981 book "The Nine Nations of North America", and what James Patterson and Peter Kim labelled the Granary in their similarly-themed work "The Day America Told The Truth" (the only exception being southern Missouri, placed in Dixie by Garreau and Old Dixie by Patterson and Kim). Another name popularly applied to the division is the "Agricultural Heartland," or simply the "Heartland."

Beginning in the early 1990s, the West North Central division has consistently had the lowest unemployment rate in the United States (especially in its many college towns), and has also been noted for its plentiful supply of affordable housing.

As of 2000, the West North Central States had a combined population of 19,237,739. This number was estimated to increase 3.0% to 19,815,497 by 2005. The West North Central region covers convert|507913|sqmi|km2|0 of land, and has an average population density of 37.88 people per square mile.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • West North Central States — Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota …   Eponyms, nicknames, and geographical games

  • East North Central States — The division contains five states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. It is one of two divisions used to categorize the region of the U.S. generally called the Midwest ; the other such division is the West North Central States (The …   Wikipedia

  • North Central — may refer to: North Central College, a private, 4 year comprehensive liberal arts college located in Naperville, Illinois. Founded in 1861, it is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Comprehensive fees for the 2010 2011 academic year… …   Wikipedia

  • North–Central American English — is used to refer to a dialect of American English. The region is also known as Upper Midwest among some linguists.[1] It is also sometimes called the Minnesota Accent or Great Lakes Accent.[who?] It is widely spoken in the Upper Midwest and the… …   Wikipedia

  • North Central High School (Spokane, Washington) — North Central High School Location Spokane, Washington, United States Information Type Public Motto Yes we can! Established 1908 Principa …   Wikipedia

  • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools — NCA logo NCA operating area Abbreviation …   Wikipedia

  • North, Central American and Caribbean Junior records in athletics — are the best marks set in an event by an athlete who has not yet reached their 20th birthday in the given year of competition, competing for a member nation of the North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC).… …   Wikipedia

  • North Central Railway Zone (India) — North Central Railway 13 North Central Railway Dates of operation 2009– Track gauge Mixed Headquarters Allahabad …   Wikipedia

  • North Central West Virginia Airport — USGS aerial image, 1997 IATA …   Wikipedia

  • North Central Rockies forest — North Central Rockies forests Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.